Science & Health

Environment
3:05 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Leaked Encyclical Highlights Growing Resistance To Pope's Reform Agenda

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 5:27 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Red Crabs Invade Southern California Beaches In Search Of Warm Water

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 5:48 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
12:58 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Why Some Teen Brains May Be Hardwired To Make Risky Choices

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 10:45 am

Teenagers aren't exactly known for their responsible decision making.

But some young people are especially prone to making rash, risky decisions about sex, drugs and alcohol. Individual differences in the brain's working memory — which allows people to draw on and use information to make decisions — could help explain why some adolescents are especially impulsive when it comes to sex, according to a study published Wednesday in Child Development.

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The Salt
12:50 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

To Tackle Food Waste, Big Grocery Chain Will Sell Produce Rejects

Imperfect Produce is a new venture that's sourcing funny-looking produce and partnering with the chain Raley's to sell it at discounted prices.
Courtesy of Imperfect Produce

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 9:45 am

It's easy to blame someone else for food waste. If this is really a $2.6 trillion issue, as the United Nations estimates, then who's in charge of fixing it?

Turns out, we the eaters play a big role here.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

NASA Satellites Show World's Thirst For Groundwater

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, or GRACE, used a pair of satellites to measure water use in the world's aquifers.
NASA

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 5:25 pm

New data from NASA's GRACE satellites show that many of the world's biggest aquifers are being sucked dry at a rate far greater than they are being replenished. Although scientists don't know how much water is left, they hope their findings will serve as a "red flag" for regions that may be overusing water.

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Shots - Health News
8:35 pm
Tue June 16, 2015

Updated Training Of Birth Control Counselors Boosts Use Of IUDs

When health care providers have the latest information on various birth control methods, research suggests, more of their patients who use birth control choose a long-acting reversible method, like the IUD.
iStockphoto

Just over half of all pregnancies in America are unplanned.

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Research News
4:07 am
Tue June 16, 2015

Disagreeable Teens Fail To Understand Their Blind Spots, Research Reveals

Originally published on Tue June 16, 2015 6:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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U.S.
5:30 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Endangered Species Protections At Center Of Drought Debate

The sun sets over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta near Rio Vista, Calif., in 2013. The delta is the largest West Coast estuary and a source of conflict over the state's water.
Robert Galbraith Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 1:23 pm

Travel up and down California farm country, the Central Valley, and you hardly hear people lamenting the lack of rain or how dry this past winter was. What you hear, from the agriculture industry and many local and national politicians, are sentiments like those expressed by Rep. Devin Nunes:

"Well, what I always like to say is that this is a man-made drought created by government," the Central Valley Republican says.

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The Salt
4:36 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod.
Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 6:50 pm

In the ocean off of Massachusetts, an unlikely alliance of scientists and fishermen is on a quest. They're looking for mating codfish. The goal is not only to revive a depleted fish population but to save an endangered fishing community as well.

Cod were once so plentiful in New England waters that people used to say you could almost walk across their backs. Cod fueled a huge fishing industry. But now they're scarce, mostly from overfishing.

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Science
2:03 pm
Mon June 15, 2015

Instead Of Replacing Missing Body Parts, Moon Jellies Recycle

Upon injury, juvenile jellyfish reorganize their bodies to regain symmetry.
Courtesy Michael Abrams, Ty Basinger, and Christopher Frick, California Institute of Technology/PNAS

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 5:39 pm

Moon jellies have an unusual self-repair strategy, scientists have learned. If one of these young jellies loses some limbs, it simply rearranges what's left until its body is once again symmetrical.

"We were not expecting to see that," says Michael Abrams, a graduate student in biology at the California Institute of Technology.

All creatures have tricks to heal themselves. If you get a cut, your skin will form a scar. And some sea creatures, like starfish and sea cucumbers, can regenerate lost body parts.

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Research News
4:00 am
Mon June 15, 2015

Having An Older Sister Can Change Siblings' Lives, Study Finds

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 10:17 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:48 am
Mon June 15, 2015

Take A Swing At This: Golf Is Exercise, Cart Or No Cart

Ryo Ishikawa, one of Japan's biggest golf stars, demonstrates his swing on the pro tour in February.
Donald Miralle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 12:29 pm

When we asked adults who play sports which one they play the most, golf topped the list. That's right: Our poll finds that a day on the links beat out soccer, softball and tennis.

My first reaction was: Whaaat? Golf is played by people riding around in motorized carts; how much exercise could you possibly get?

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Space
4:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Hello Earth! Can You Hear Me?'

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Science
4:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

In Massachusetts Lab, Scientists Grow An Artificial Rat Limb

In the study, muscle cells were injected into the cell-free "scaffolding" of a rat limb, which provided shape and structure onto which regenerated tissue could grow.
Bernhard Jank, MD Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 6:00 am

A team of scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston made news earlier this month when they published research in the journal Biomaterials describing how they'd created the world's first bioartificial limb in the laboratory.

Or, in other words: scientists have now grown the entire forelimb of a rat in a lab.

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Goats and Soda
4:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

Why MERS Is Likely To Crop Up Outside The Middle East Again

A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula.
Dave Yoder National Geographic

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:09 pm

Blame it on the camels.

When scientists first detected Middle East respiratory syndrome in 2012, the big question was: Where is this virus coming from?

For several years, scientists hunted the deadly virus across the Arabian Peninsula, and eventually they found at least one source — dromedary camels.

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