Science & Health

Research News
4:10 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Built In Better Times, University Labs Now Lack Research Funding

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 7:01 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Science & Health
3:41 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Montgomery Unveils Emergency Communication System

A new program will allow Montgomery County residents to establish online profiles that are expected to quickly provide information to emergency responders.

The Montgomery Advertiser reported Tuesday that the Smart911 program will allow people to automatically supply emergency responders with information on their medical history, disabilities, pets and photos of people who live in the home they're responding to.

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Shots - Health News
5:00 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

Love And Sex In The Time Of Viagra — 16 Years On

Mountains of "little blue pills" and their chemical kin have transformed the way many people think about sex and aging.
Raphael Gaillarde Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 11, 2014 4:37 pm

The lives of older men have changed in a significant way since 1998, or at least their sex lives have changed. That's the year Viagra was introduced. Cialis and Levitra followed a few years later.

The once taboo subject of erectile dysfunction is now inescapable for anyone who watches TV. Late-night comedians continually mine the topic. By 2002, Jay Leno had told 944 Viagra jokes, according to the Wall Street Journal. We couldn't independently verify that number. Actually, we didn't try.

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Children's Virus-Alabama
4:13 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

Public Health Officials Test Kids For Enterovirus

Health officials say the department sent a message to all primary health physicians Aug. 29 to begin testing children showing symptoms of a severe respiratory illness.
Credit istockphoto

Alabama Department of Public Health officials say they're investigating cases of a respiratory illness in children in Mobile and north Alabama.

Officials say six specimens have been sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be tested for enterovirus D68. Health officials say the department sent a message to all primary health physicians Aug. 29 to begin testing children showing symptoms of a severe respiratory illness.

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Science
4:13 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

U.S. Gets Middling Marks On 2014 'State Of Birds' Report Card

"The State of the Birds" 2014 report found that red knots (above) and other shorebirds are among the most threatened groups in the U.S. More than half of U.S. shorebird species are on the report's Watch List — species that are currently endangered or at risk.
Gerrit Vyn The Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 10:30 am

All is not well with the nation's birds. The most comprehensive study ever of birds in America is out today, and it says many populations are in steep decline, even as others are doing well.

The report, called "The State of the Birds," comes from the federal government, universities and conservation groups — 23 organizations that have spent years examining bird populations, as well as habitats where the various species live.

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Shots - Health News
4:13 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

When Scientists Give Up

Randen Patterson left a research career in physiology at U.C. Davis when funding got too tight. He now owns a grocery store in Guinda, Calif.
Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 2:29 pm

Ian Glomski thought he was going to make a difference in the fight to protect people from deadly anthrax germs. He had done everything right — attended one top university, landed an assistant professorship at another.

But Glomski ran head-on into an unpleasant reality: These days, the scramble for money to conduct research has become stultifying.

So, he's giving up on science.

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The Salt
1:23 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

Why Food Pilgrims Will Wait Four Hours For A Taste Of The Sublime

Aficionados line up outside Hot Doug's, a gourmet hot dog diner in Chicago, in May. Owner Doug Sohn has announced that he will shut the doors in October after nearly 14 years.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 11:04 am

During a trip to Austin, Texas, last year, Sarah Grieco and her friends stood in line for two hours to taste the famously delicious smoked meat at La Barbecue.

Before that, Grieco, 25, says she queued up for pork belly pancakes in Seattle, and ramen burgers in New York. And she and a friend waited three hours for the flashy cronut at Dominic Ansel Bakery.

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The Two-Way
8:35 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Scientists Doubt That Meteor Caused Crater In Nicaragua

A handout picture provided by Nicaraguan Army on Monday shows the place where what was first reported as a meteorite fell close to International Airport Augusto Sandino, in Managua, Nicaragua.
Nicaraguan Army/ Handout EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 10:09 am

We reported on Monday that a meteor, thought possibly to be a chunk of an Earth-passing asteroid, was the cause of a 40-foot crater outside the international airport in the Nicaraguan capital.

But astronomers and NASA scientists are now casting doubt on that possibility. The biggest mystery is that no one so far has reported seeing a flash of light in the sky that would be expected to accompany such a meteor strike.

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Science & Health
8:34 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Univ. of Alabama, Lockheed to Partner on New Lab

Culverhouse School of Business--UA

Lockheed Martin will work with the University of Alabama to develop an analytics research lab on the UA campus in Tuscaloosa.

The Culverhouse College of Commerce will host the first facility of this kind in the U.S. dedicated exclusively to the field of data science. The lab will work to discover meaningful patterns within data. The lab will also provide collaboration and research across government, industry, and academia to help companies anticipate and solve problems.

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Science & Health
6:12 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Safety Board to Take Up Fatal Cargo Airline Crash

Credit Hal Yeager/AP

An accident investigations board is scheduled to meet Tuesday to decide the cause of a fatal cargo plane crash that has become the focus of dispute between UPS and its pilot union over whether work schedules are inducing fatigue and jeopardizing safety.

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NPR Story
4:06 am
Tue September 9, 2014

In Some Jobs, Past Achievements May Work Against Female Workers

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 8:14 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Environment
2:33 am
Tue September 9, 2014

More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

A Baltimore oriole perches near apple blossoms in Mendota Heights, Minn.
Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 7:33 am

People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their Major League Baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced to nest well north of the Mid-Atlantic state.

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Shots - Health News
2:29 am
Tue September 9, 2014

U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 5:43 pm

Ten years ago, Robert Waterland got an associate professorship at Baylor College of Medicine and set off to study one of the nation's most pressing health problems: obesity. In particular, he's been trying to figure out the biology behind why children born to obese women are more likely to develop the condition themselves.

Waterland got sustaining funding from the National Institutes of Health and used it to get the project going.

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The Salt
4:35 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Could Great Lakes Fisheries Be Revived Through Fish Farms?

Opponents of Michigan fish farms say there is no room for them in the lakes because of sport fishing and other recreational activities.
sfgamchick/Flickr

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 6:20 pm

Even though Michigan is surrounded by more than 20 percent of the world's freshwater, fish farming is largely unheard of there.

But this summer, the aquaculture industry took a step forward. And that has touched off a debate over the appropriateness of fish farming on the Great Lakes.

There's only one company now in Michigan that raises fish for restaurants and grocery stores in large volumes. It's a family business, run by Dan Vogler, on a few acres near Harrietta, Mich., population 143.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Researcher Urges Wider Genetic Screening For Breast Cancer

Lisa Schlager of Chevy Chase, Md., demonstrates outside of the Supreme Court as arguments were made in a case seeking to determine whether the BRCA breast cancer genes can be patented. The court ruled in 2013 that individual genes can't be patented.
Tom Williams CQ Roll Call/Getty

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 11:43 am

A prominent scientist has started a big new debate about breast cancer. Geneticist Mary-Claire King of the University of Washington, who identified the first breast cancer gene, is recommending that all women get tested for genetic mutations that can cause breast cancer.

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