Rosa Parks Museum

Stan Ingold

  2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of a number of key moments in the fight for civil rights. Alabama Public Radio’s Stan Ingold recently began a trek to several spots around the state that are linked to the civil rights struggle. Visitors from around the world are coming to these sites as tourists. Stan recently took us to Selma and this time we look at Montgomery where to voting rights march took place.

The life-size bronze sculpture of Rosa Parks has received a makeover.

With the 60th anniversary of the Montgomery bus boycott on Tuesday, sculptor Erik Blome recently returned to touch up the sculpture 15 years after the statue was placed in the Rosa Parks Museum in Montgomery. The sculpture was touched up after wearing down and losing some color from constant touching and interaction.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports that Blome touched up the sculpture Nov. 19. The sculpture depicts Parks sitting on a bus seat, hands settled on a purse in her lap.

The Rosa Parks museum at Troy University is offering free admission to celebrate the 58th anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Officials said Monday that the museum will offer free admission to the main Rosa Parks Museum and the Children's Wing on Dec. 2 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott began with Rosa Parks' arrest Dec. 1, 1955. The museum is built on the site of the Empire Theatre, where Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery city bus.

Groups of 10 or more are asked to make reservations.