Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

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One of the most famous magic tricks of all time would never have been possible without a certain Washington connection.

Everywhere you turn in the world of sports, in seemingly every league, in amateur, college and professional ranks, you find athletes carrying the banner of some sort of political protest. But it started with Muhammad Ali.

Today, there's LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and their teammates wearing gray hoodies in support of Trayvon Martin.

The Chicago Bulls' Derrick Rose donning a T-shirt that reads "I CAN'T BREATHE" before another game.

Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe taking a stand in favor of same-sex marriage.

The House has approved a bipartisan bill to help Puerto Rico tackle its $70 billion debt crisis, just weeks before a July deadline for the island's next debt payment.

Supporters of the bill say it is not a bailout, NPR's Greg Allen tells our Newscast unit:

"The plan includes no federal money for the U.S. territory," Greg says. "It creates a seven-member financial control board, appointed by the president from a list put together by Congress.

How many countries are in the European Union?

If you're like most Americans, you can only guess. Maybe it's a dozen. Maybe twice that. Who cares, really?

Economists do. They care a lot.

Most say the EU's current collection of 28 members adds stability to the global economy. If membership were to decline by just one — thanks to the proposed exit of the United Kingdom — then workers and companies all around the world would suffer, they argue.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has endorsed presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Warren, a hero of progressive Democrats, is the latest party leader to fall in line behind Clinton after she clinched the requisite number of delegates earlier this week over rival Bernie Sanders.

The Clinton campaign was about to release a video with President Obama endorsing Hillary Clinton when the candidate called in for a brief interview with NPR.

In that interview, Clinton said she was "thrilled" to have the president's endorsement and looked forward to campaigning with him.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Women, as a bloc, are loyal Democratic voters. But under that giant gender umbrella, there's a lot of nuance.

White women traditionally support the Republican nominee for president. And this is particularly true of white, suburban, married women.

In fact, President Obama lost white women by 14 points (56 percent to 42 percent) in the 2012 election, according to exit poll analysis.

Shrinking that gap is key to Hillary Clinton's plan to win the White House, particularly to offset any potentially low Democratic turnout among young voters.

Two days after Hillary Clinton secured enough delegates to be the presumptive nominee of the Democratic Party, President Obama endorsed Clinton on Thursday in a video. The two will campaign together next week in Wisconsin.

A lot can change in eight years.

Back in 2008, Barack Obama helped keep Hillary Clinton out of the White House. Now he's endorsing her bid for president.

And he is likely to be one of her best campaign weapons.

"I've gotten to know Hillary really well," the president told Glenn Thrush on a Politico podcast. "She is a good, smart, tough person who cares deeply about this country."

That's what he says now.

The woman leading the federal government's effort to block a North Carolina law that limits the rights of transgender people knows what it's like to feel like an outsider.

Vanita Gupta, 41, is the child of immigrants who left India in search of better economic opportunity. That journey took her as a small child from a McDonald's in London where her family fled racial insults and french fries thrown by bigoted skinheads all the way to the Ivy League.

You'd be forgiven for mistaking the beginning of this new ad running in several battleground states for a message from a conservative Christian group.

Updated at 12:44 p.m. ET

President Obama met with Bernie Sanders on Thursday morning at the White House. Now that Hillary Clinton has clinched the Democratic nomination, the question on the minds of many Democrats is when the Vermont senator will give up his fight for the party's presidential nomination.

The battle between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump for the White House is likely to center on the Rust Belt — the industrial Midwest where trade is a big issue for many voters and where the presumptive Republican nominee is predicting he will be able to cut into the Democratic Party's traditional dominance among members of labor unions.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Gay and lesbian activists gather at the White House on Thursday for a celebration marking LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) Pride Month. It's become an annual event, tied to the monthlong commemoration of the Stonewall riots, which helped launch the modern gay liberation movement.

President Obama's years in office have seen a flowering of gay and lesbian rights, culminating a year ago when the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Hillary Clinton declared victory on Tuesday night, but Bernie Sanders fights on.

"The struggle continues. We are going to fight for every vote in Tuesday's primary in Washington, DC, and then we will bring our political revolution to the Democratic convention in Philadelphia," he wrote in a fundraising email sent Wednesday morning, adding, "we will continue to fight for every vote and every delegate we can get."

Sanders pledged to keep campaigning through the District of Columbia primary on June 14.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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