Politics & Government

Politics
1:08 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

When Is A Filibuster Not Really a Filibuster? When It Looks Like A Filibuster

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul's 10 1/2 hours on the Senate floor were about liberty, the Constitution and the need to stand out in a field of presidential hopefuls.
Andrew Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 3:49 pm

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a Republican, held the floor of the Senate for 10 1/2 hours Wednesday afternoon and evening, airing his objections to the NSA bulk collection of telephone records in the U.S.

Many of the accounts of this lengthy performance referred to it as a filibuster, or a near-filibuster, or some kind of filibuster or other.

It was none of the above.

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It's All Politics
12:50 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Gyrocopter Pilot On His 'Incredible' Flight Onto Capitol Lawn

Doug Hughes said he sees his future as working for "the cause of getting a Congress — not more liberal, not more conservative — but a Congress that is working for the people."
Peter Overby NPR

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 7:39 am

Florida postman Doug Hughes made headlines last month for landing his gyrocopter on the lawn in front of the Capitol building.

In an interview with NPR, Hughes said he "made every effort to send word ahead" about the flight, but also knew he would be taken into custody. He made the flight anyway, he said, to "get a message to the American people — not that there's a problem with Congress but that there are solutions to the problem."

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The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Obama Calls Loss Of Ramadi A 'Setback,' But Denies U.S. Is Losing To ISIS

President Obama tells The Atlantic that the loss of Ramadi to the self-declared Islamic State is a "setback," but he denies the U.S. is losing to the group.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 4:26 pm

President Obama says that while the loss of Ramadi to the self-declared Islamic State is a "setback," he doesn't think the U.S. is losing to the militant group.

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The Two-Way
5:52 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Sen. Rand Paul Stages 'Filibuster' To Protest Patriot Act

In an image from Senate video, presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul speaks on the floor of the U.S. Senate Wednesday afternoon at the start of an almost 11-hour speech opposing renewal of the Patriot Act.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 12:04 pm

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Protesting the soon-to-expire Patriot Act, presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul held the floor of the Senate for nearly 11 hours late Wednesday in a filibuster-like speech railing against the law and the government's continued surveillance of Americans' phone records.

"I don't think we're any safer looking at every American's records," Paul said.

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Politics
5:16 am
Thu May 21, 2015

Sen. Rand Paul Ends 'Filibuster' Over NSA Surveillance Program

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 5:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

On the Senate floor yesterday, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul started talking. He spoke for 10 hours about his opposition to NSA surveillance of Americans' phone records.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Middle East
4:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Netanyahu Cancels Palestinian-Only Bus Plan Just Before Scheduled Start

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 6:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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It's All Politics
3:59 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Immigrant Family's Hope On Hold After Promises From The President

Karla Rodriguez and her family: Evelia Beltran (from left), Aileen Orozco, Cesar Orozco, Karla Rodriguez, Evelyn Orozco, Brandon Orozco and Brenda Orozco.
Courtesy of Karla Rodriguez

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:40 pm

Six months ago, when President Obama announced sweeping and polarizing executive actions on immigration, immigrant families all over the country were watching his rare prime-time address.

But those actions have now fallen out of the headlines and the highest-profile changes are on hold.

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Shots - Health News
3:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Terminally Ill California Mom Speaks Out Against Assisted Suicide

Stephanie and Brian Packer make lunch with their children, Brian, 11, Savannah, 5, Scarlett, 10, and Jacob, 8.
Stephanie O'Neill/KPCC

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 4:32 pm

Stephanie Packer was 29 when she found out she had a terminal lung disease.

That's the same age as Brittany Maynard, who last year was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. Last fall, Maynard, of Northern California, opted to end her life with the help of a doctor in Oregon, where physician-assisted suicide is legal.

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It's All Politics
2:17 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Popular Health Exchange In Jeopardy After Surprise Republican Win

People line up outside the Kynect store at the Fayette Mall, in Lexington, Ky., in February to apply for health insurance through the state exchange.
Adam Beam AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 2:22 pm

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It's All Politics
11:53 am
Wed May 20, 2015

Who Is Clinton Confidant Sidney Blumenthal?

Blumenthal was one of just four witnesses deposed by the U.S. Senate when it tried (and acquitted) Clinton on the impeachment charges early in 1999.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 12:57 pm

Before there was George, there was Sid.

George Stephanopoulos is, of course, the ABC news anchor whose $75,000 in donations to the Clinton foundation have reminded the world of his longtime ties to Bill Clinton, for whom he worked from 1991 to 1997.

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Politics
4:11 am
Wed May 20, 2015

After Derailment, Congress Debates Lifting Amtrak's Damage Cap

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 3:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Last week's Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia renewed questions about a decades-old law which limits the money Amtrak can pay out in damages. Some Democratic lawmakers want to raise the limit. Here's NPR's Juana Summers.

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The Two-Way
6:50 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Beau Biden, Vice President Joe Biden's Son, Hospitalized

Former Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden, Vice President Joe Biden's son, is being treated at a military hospital outside Washington, the vice president's office said.

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Politics
5:47 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Foundations To SEC: Force Corporations To Disclose Political Giving

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:51 am

Secret money in politics, especially the corporate variety, has been controversial ever since the Supreme Court's 2010 ruling in the Citizens United case. Now, about 70 charitable foundations are asking the Securities and Exchange Commission to end that secrecy.

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It's All Politics
5:14 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

After A Month, The 7 Questions Hillary Clinton Answered From The Media

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton speaks at a small-business forum at Bike Tech bicycle shop Tuesday in Cedar Falls, Iowa.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Until Tuesday, it had been almost a month since Hillary Clinton had answered a question from the press.

After taking questions from Iowans in Cedar Rapids, where she spoke about small business, the former secretary of state then answered six questions from reporters. She also took an awkwardly timed one about whether she'll answer questions from media in the middle of the event. The questions after the event ranged from the release of her emails when she was secretary of state and criticism over foreign donations to the Clinton foundation to the state of Iraq and more.

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Politics
3:49 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

As States Ready Disaster Plans, Feds Urge Them To Consider Climate Change

Demolition crews remove the last remains of a house that was destroyed by Superstorm Sandy, which battered parts of the East Coast, in 2013.
Wayne Parry AP

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 6:06 pm

The Atlantic hurricane season starts next month — a time when coastal states have their disaster plans at the ready. Now, the federal government wants states to consider the potential effects of climate change in those blueprints.

States lay out strategies for reducing harm from a whole host of calamities that might strike, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, or drought.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, gives states money to mitigate those risks — grants that might help pay for tornado safe rooms, or to elevate buildings in a flood zone, for instance.

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