Montgomery County schools

Alabama State House
Jay Williams / Flickr

Time is running out for the Alabama Legislature to work out a general fund budget, but the state Senate is beginning to iron out the details.

State agency heads told members of the Senate Budget Committee yesterday that proposed cuts will close circuit clerk offices, slash Medicaid services and send state prisons into a danger zone of crowding and violence.

Committee Chairman Arthur Orr says there are close to $150 million in revenue-generating bills under discussion that could reduce the cuts if they win legislative approval.

The Alabama Supreme Court is refusing to reconsider a ruling that some say could make it easier for government organizations to meet behind closed doors.

The justices issued a ruling Friday saying they won't revisit the case of Clay Slagle, who sued after he wasn't given the job of Montgomery County's school superintendent in 2009.

Slagle claimed school board members held illegal, private meetings before refusing to hire him.

(Information in the following story is from: Montgomery Advertiser,

Alabama's state school superintendent says he expects the Montgomery County school system to have a plan by Christmas to make sure grade-changing doesn't occur again.

State Superintendent Tommy Bice said the state Department of Education wants the plan for institutional control in place before the second semester starts. The department will appoint a monitor to make sure the school system carries out its new plan.

State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice says his department will investigate allegations of widespread grade changing in the Montgomery County public school system. Bice said on Friday that Montgomery Superintendent Barbara Thompson sought the department's help, and the investigation is beginning immediately. Teachers who worked in Robert E. Lee, Jeff Davis and Sidney Lanier high schools in Montgomery said they witnessed or participated in the improper changing of hundreds of grades. Nearly 30 current and former employees were interviewed. The majority worked at Lee.