Mo Brooks

Alabama Senator and former Attorney General Luther Strange is pulling out all the stops to maintain his Senate seat – including calls from the President.

Strange’s campaign announced yesterday that President Donald Trump has recorded robocalls telling Alabama voters to “go to the polls and vote for Luther Strange.” Trump says his administration is accomplishing many of his campaign promises, but he “needs Luther to help us out.”

The deadline to register to vote is nearing in Alabama's U.S. Senate primary.

Voters have through July 31 to register to vote in the Aug. 15 primary. 

  Crowded fields of Republicans and Democrats are vying to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate.

A primary runoff, if needed, will be held on Sept. 26. The general election will be held Dec. 12.

Mo Brooks
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The race to fill Alabama’s second U.S. Senate seat is heating up, and a recent informal poll could spell bad news for the incumbent.

Nine candidates, both Republican and Democrat, vying for Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat participated in a candidate forum and straw poll last night in Huntsville. Al.com reports the event was organized by the Christian Citizen Task Force, with over 300 people in attendance.

Governor Robert Bentley's office says he has interviewed suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and 10 other people for the U.S. Senate seat now held by attorney general-designee Jeff Sessions.

Bentley spokeswoman Yasamie August says Moore was interviewed at the recommendation of the Alabama Republican Party. Moore is fighting what amounts to a permanent ouster after being convicted of violating judicial ethics rules over his opposition to gay-marriage.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says he isn’t looking for an appointment to Jeff Sessions’ senate seat. But he does plan to run for the office in a special election that may not be held until 2018.

Alabama’s junior U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions was recently tapped by President-elect Donald Trump to serve as his Attorney General. That leaves a vacant seat that lots of Alabama politicians are clamoring to fill.

Todd Strange has been re-elected to serve his third term as the mayor of Montgomery.

In the capital city’s mayoral election yesterday, Strange carried 56 percent of the vote. Former U.S. Congressman Artur Davis finished at a distant 27 percent after reportedly spending over $600,000 of his own money on his campaign.

Davis said in his concession speech that he still intends to be the next mayor of Montgomery, it just may be four years later than he had hoped.

http://brooks.house.gov/about-me / Wikimedia Commons

A Republican congressman from Alabama says Democrats are engaged in a "war on whites."

Congressman Mo Brooks made his comment on conservative talk radio host Laura Ingraham's program. He said the Democratic Party claims white people hate everyone else and that it's part of President Barack Obama's strategy of dividing people on the basis of race, sex and class.

The remarks came in a discussion on immigration legislation passed last week by the House that could result in increased deportations.

http://brooks.house.gov/about-me / Wikimedia Commons

Alabama's 5th congressional district covers the entire northern part of Alabama stretching from Florence to Huntsville. In Democratic hands for over a century it's only been recently that District 5 has gone Republican, with Mo Brooks victory in 2010. Brooks is being opposed this time around by Democrat Charlie Holley. Alabama Public Radio's Ryan Vasquez spoke with Dr.