Harvey Updyke


Auburn University officials have testified about the hundreds of thousands of dollars they say the school has spent because of the poisoning of the oak trees at Toomer's Corner.

   The testimony came during a hearing Wednesday before Lee County Circuit Judge Jacob Walker to determine how much restitution Harvey Updyke should pay for poisoning the famous oak trees.

   Walker did not rule and gave attorneys 30 days to submit briefs.

   Updyke's attorney, Andrew Stanley, said his client is indigent and only has $630 to his name.


A judge will hold a hearing to determine whether University of Alabama fan Harvey Updyke should pay Auburn University about $1 million for poisoning its landmark oak trees.

   The Opelika-Auburn News (http://bit.ly/12RVcdW ) reports that Circuit Judge Jacob A. Walker III scheduled the hearing for Sept. 18.

   The hearing is to determine whether Updyke must pay restitution for killing the trees at Toomer's Corner. Auburn fans traditionally rolled the trees with toilet paper after a big win.


University of Alabama fan Harvey Updyke is due in court for a hearing leading up to his trial on charges of poisoning Auburn University's landmark oak trees.

Lee County Circuit Judge Jacob A. Walker III scheduled a hearing for Wednesday.

Walker is set to consider several motions filed by lawyers in the case, possibly including a defense request to move the trial outside of Lee County.

Prosecutors also have asked the court to revoke Updyke's bond.


A tentative trial date has been set for Harvey Updyke Jr., the man accused of poisoning the Toomer's Oaks at Auburn University with a powerful herbicide during Auburn's national championship run in the 2010 football season.

Updyke is scheduled to appear in court April 8. A hearing will also be held Feb. 13 to discuss pending motions — which include a request by the Lee County District Attorney's Office to revoke Updyke's bond.


Auburn University is seeking input from students, faculty and residents on what Toomer's Corner should look like if the iconic oak trees have to be destroyed after they were poisoned.

The Opelika-Auburn News reports (http://bit.ly/11bFHSk) that feedback is being sought in the form of an online survey from now until Jan. 18.

Dan King, assistant vice president for Auburn's facilities department, says officials at the university are being proactive in developing a future plan in the event that the trees must be taken down.


A Lee County judge handling the Toomer's Oaks poisoning case will consider a request from prosecutors Wednesday to revoke the bond for 64-year-old Harvey Updyke.

The Opelika-Auburn News(http://bit.ly/UPLpoC ) reports that the district attorney's office based its request on Updyke being arrested in Hammond, La., where he was accused of threatening an employee at a home improvement store.

AP Photo/Opelika-Auburn News, Vasha Hunt, Pool

The Alabama football fan charged with poisoning Auburn University's landmark oak trees is free from custody following the completion of a mental evaluation.

A Lee County judge has released Harvey Updyke into the supervision of his daughter in Louisiana now that the psychiatric testing is done.

The Opelika-Auburn News (http://bit.ly/QtiQwJ ) reported Friday that the judge scheduled a competency hearing for Updyke for Dec. 10 in Opelika. Prosecutors requested the hearing.

Auburn Toomer's Corner poisoning trial delayed

Jun 21, 2012
Toomer's Corner in Auburn Alabama
hz536n/George Thomas / Flickr

A judge is delaying the trial of an Alabama fan accused of poisoning Auburn's cherished Toomer's Corner oak trees.

Defense attorneys for Harvey Updyke have asked the judge to move the trial to a different location. Judge Jacob Walker said Thursday that he would set a hearing date to consider the request.