gay marriage

The United States Supreme Court says same sex marriages are legal nationwide, but marriage licenses aren't going out yet in Tuscaloosa County.

Dozens of activists gathered outside the County Courthouse to celebrate the decision. But inside the courthouse, clerks had no plans to begin issuing same-sex marriage licenses.

Tuscaloosa County Probate Judge Hardy McCollum says he's following the law...

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange released a statement regarding the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to legalize Gay Marriage across the country, including Alabama.

“Today the United States Supreme Court overturned centuries of tradition and the will of the citizens of a majority of the States in declaring that Alabama and the rest of the nation must legally recognize same-sex marriage ,” said Attorney General Strange.

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An Alabama appeals court says a judge can't order child visitation following the split-up of a same-sex couple.

The Alabama Court of Civil Appeals ruled Friday that a Jefferson County judge was wrong to order child visitation for a woman who split up with her partner of 16 years.

The county judge based the decision on an adoption ruling issued in a Georgia case. But the Alabama appeals court says the ruling can't stand because the Georgia court lacked the power to issue such an order.

A national group that pushes equal rights for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people has hired a former clergyman to lead its efforts in Mississippi.

Rob Hill grew up in Mississippi, and spent 12 years as a United Methodist pastor. He said Tuesday that he started work July 14 for Human Rights Campaign and its "Project One America."

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Two women challenging Alabama's ban on recognizing same-sex marriages are asking a judge to decide the case without holding a trial.

Attorneys for Cari Searcy and Kimberly McKeand of Mobile filed the request in federal court in Mobile. They have one of three suits challenging Alabama's ban. They were married in California in 2008 and want Alabama to recognize the marriage.

Alabama's governor and attorney general are asking the judge to dismiss the suit.

The other two suits challenging the ban are pending in federal courts in Montgomery and Birmingham.

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In the latest challenge to Alabama's ban on gay marriage, a lesbian couple is suing the state over recognition of their marriage, performed in Massachusetts. April and Ginger Aaron-Brush of Birmingham filed the lawsuit Tuesday in federal court in Birmingham.

The lawsuit asks a judge to declare the ban unconstitutional and require Alabama to recognize same-sex marriages performed validly in other states.

The American Civil Liberties Union is representing the couple.

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The mother of an accident victim is now involved in a federal lawsuit filed by his same-sex partner, who is trying to overturn Alabama's ban on gay marriage. A federal judge in Montgomery says Pat Fancher can intervene in a lawsuit filed after the death of 53-year-old David Fancher. Fancher's longtime partner, Paul Hard, sued in December. The two men were legally married in Massachusetts, but Alabama law doesn't recognize same-sex marriages. Hard's lawsuit asks a court to strike down Alabama laws banning same-sex unions.

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A retired United Methodist bishop is facing formal complaints over a gay wedding he performed in Alabama.

A church statement says complaints have been filed against Bishop Melvin G. Talbert, who conducted the wedding ceremony for two men in October. The statement says Talbert is accused of violating his "sacred trust" as a bishop by performing the ceremony.

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A gay man whose husband was killed in a car accident is filing a federal lawsuit challenging the Alabama laws that prohibit the recognition of his marriage, which was legally performed in Massachusetts. The lawsuit in Montgomery federal court seeks to overturn Alabama's bans on the recognition of same-sex marriages legally performed in other states. Plaintiff Paul Hard and David Fancher, both of Montgomery, were married in 2011. Three months later, Fancher was killed in a car accident.

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Known for fighting to display the Ten Commandments in his state's judicial building, Alabama's chief justice is jumping into the national gay marriage debate. Roy Moore has sent letters to all 50 governors urging them to get their legislatures to call for a convention to add an amendment to the U.S. Constitution recognizing only unions between one man and one woman. Moore says the country's moral foundation is under attack, and a state-initiated convention under Article V of the Constitution is the only way to stop it. An Article V convention has never been held.


A college Republican leader has upset some older Republicans in Alabama by supporting gay marriage.

The chairwoman of the College Republican Federation of Alabama, Stephanie Petelos, spoke in favor of the U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act.

The chairman of the Alabama Republican Party says U.S. Supreme Court decisions favoring gay marriage are an affront to Christian principles and hurt taxpayers.

GOP chair Bill Armistead says Alabama taxpayers will now "be on the hook" for funding federal benefits to homosexual couples even though a decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act only affects states where gay marriage is legal.

Armistead says the United States was founded on Christian values, and he says the Bible is clear that marriage can only between heterosexual couples.

Republican chief justice candidate Roy Moore says the church has been silenced by political correctness. Moore spoke Tuesday at a rally on the state Capitol steps.

It was organized by several ministers concerned about President Obama's views on same-sex marriage and abortion.

Moore said America is in a time of moral decay and is seeing an attack on the institution of marriage. He said he's tired of hearing politicians say let's get down to the real issues because marriage and abortion are real issues.

Alabama Supreme Court candidate Roy Moore says same-sex marriage will lead to the "ultimate destruction" of America. The Republican nominee for chief justice made his comments during a Tea Party rally in Fort Payne on Saturday. Moore says same-sex marriage will lead to the nation's demise because it attacks the nation's foundation. Moore says the Democratic national platform is divisive for supporting same-sex rights. Moore's Democratic opponent for chief justice, Jefferson County Circuit Judge Robert Vance, says same-sex marriage isn't an issue in Alabama.

Alabama Bishop Won't Allow Blessing of Gay Unions

Jul 22, 2012
picture of Episcopal Bishop of Alabama Kee Sloan


An Episcopal bishop in Alabama says he won't allow priests in his diocese to bless same-sex unions for the time being.

Bishop Kee Sloan voted in favor of creating a new blessing for same-sex couples in July during a national convention of the Episcopal Church. Sloan's diocese is part of the larger Episcopal denomination, which claims roughly 2 million members.