Donald Trump

Trump Mobile rally
Jeff Haller / New York Times

President Donald Trump will be moving his visit to the Yellowhammer State up. Senator Luther Strange’s campaign team recently announced the President will attend a campaign rally in Huntsville at 7 p.m. on Friday.

President Trump’s visit comes just four days before the Republican runoff election between sitting U.S. Senator Luther Strange and Roy Moore, Alabama’s former chief justice. The two men are locked in a heated race for the Republican nomination for Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat.

 

U.S. Sen. Luther Strange made his case to state Republican party leaders on Saturday, urging them to vote for him in a GOP runoff next month because of his "conservative accomplishments" and the endorsement of President Donald Trump.

Former Chief Justice Roy Moore, who faces Strange in the runoff, lashed out at Strange's financial backing from the GOP establishment and said the "Washington crowd" was trying to buy the Senate seat from Alabama.

Alabama Senator and former Attorney General Luther Strange is pulling out all the stops to maintain his Senate seat – including calls from the President.

Strange’s campaign announced yesterday that President Donald Trump has recorded robocalls telling Alabama voters to “go to the polls and vote for Luther Strange.” Trump says his administration is accomplishing many of his campaign promises, but he “needs Luther to help us out.”

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is offering to withdraw from a GOP Senate primary if all other Republican candidates also agree to withdraw, paving the way for Attorney General Jeff Sessions to be the party's Senate nominee this fall.

 Brooks is a Sessions ally and says he cannot remain silent about the treatment Sessions is receiving from President Donald Trump.

 

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with Russian lawyer on Tuesday. Trump Jr. forwarded the thread to Kushner and Manafort. Click the title for annotations...

 

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Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says he has questions he wants answered before turning over Alabama voter data to President Donald Trump's commission investigating alleged voter fraud.

 Merrill said Friday that there are a "number of questions we have to get answered."  He said security is one issue, but declined to name the other concerns.

Fellow Republicans are pressing President Donald Trump to come clean about whether he has tapes of private conversations with former FBI Director James Comey.   

And if he does, they want the president to hand them over to Congress or else possibly face a subpoena.

The request is a sign of escalating fallout from riveting testimony from Comey last week of undue pressure from Trump. Trump has responded to Comey's assertions by accusing him of lying.

Alabama Coal: Past and Present

May 8, 2017
Allison Mollenkamp / APR

There were a number of audiences being targeted during the race for the Presidency. One that hits home here in Alabama were coal workers. That energy source was once Alabama’s lifeblood. However, new regulations and new energy sources are changing the story and promises from the White House may not do much to breathe new life into what looks like a struggling industry.

Mark Potok
SPLC

The news headlines over the past year have been dominated by tensions. Conflicts over illegal immigration, refugee resettlement, terrorism and community race relations all led to deep divisions nationwide. Those conflicts also became the center of a bitterly contested Presidential election.

The Southern Poverty Law Center recently released its latest list and analysis of extremist and hate groups nationwide, and it appears that climate bred new hate groups.

Mark Potok is a senior fellow with the SPLC. He’s the primary editor of their HateWatch list and wrote an analysis of this year’s results.

Sessions
AP

Lawsuits have been filed claiming President Donald Trump’s foreign business dealings violate the Constitution. The impending litigation could test the relationship between President Trump and his pick for U.S. Attorney General – Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions.

The lone Democrat and black person in Alabama's congressional delegation says she is skipping the inauguration of president-elect Donald Trump.  

Representative Terri Sewell of Selma tweeted Wednesday that she can't accept the disrespect shown to Representative John Lewis of Georgia, a civil rights veteran who grew up in Alabama.

Trump criticized Lewis after the congressman questioned the legitimacy of the election and said he isn't attending the inaugural. Dozens of other congressional Democrats have since said they won't go, either.

stream pollution
Tom Henderson / AP

The state of Alabama has joined a lawsuit seeking to block new rules from the Obama administration that crack down on coal mining near waterways.

Thirteen states, led by Texas, filed that lawsuit in federal court yesterday. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton says the new “Stream Protection Rule” imposes what he calls “mandatory, one-size-fits-all” regulations that violate states’ rights.

The U.S. Department of the Interior says the new regulations will protect over 6,000 miles of America’s streams by preventing coal mining debris from being dumped into nearby waterways.

Alex AuBuchon / APR

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in her final speech as head of the Justice Department, said worries of difficult days ahead should be a call for action, not despair.

Lynch spoke at Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church where four girls were killed in a KKK bombing in 1963. In the speech for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Lynch echoed King's words after the bombing to not give into despair.

Lynch praised the work of President Obama's administration to achieve justice for all citizens.

Sessions
AP

The confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions is set to begin this week.

The Alabama senator has been nominated for the U.S. Attorney General post. Sessions’ nomination has drawn criticism from groups like the NAACP because of comments he made regarding the Ku Klux Klan and his prosecution of three activists accused of voter fraud in Perry County, Alabama. The son of the defendants in that case has come forward to endorse Sessions for Attorney General.

Within the next five months, President-elect Donald Trump could appoint a majority of the board for the Tennessee Valley Authority. The TVA is the nation's largest government-owned utility.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports three Democratic members of the board, including Chairman Joe Ritch, are leaving after the Republican-controlled Senate failed to confirm President Barack Obama's reappointment of the three directors last year.

Governor Robert Bentley's office says he has interviewed suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and 10 other people for the U.S. Senate seat now held by attorney general-designee Jeff Sessions.

Bentley spokeswoman Yasamie August says Moore was interviewed at the recommendation of the Alabama Republican Party. Moore is fighting what amounts to a permanent ouster after being convicted of violating judicial ethics rules over his opposition to gay-marriage.

A failed voting-fraud prosecution from more than 30 years ago is likely to re-emerge as a contentious issue during Senator Jeff Sessions' confirmation hearing for attorney general.    He was dogged by his handling of the case as U.S. attorney during his 1986 confirmation hearing for a federal judgeship.  

                                                                                                                                                             

Trump tree
Evan Vucci / AP

The chief of staff to Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson is apologizing for his role in having a cedar tree cut down at a public park and used as a prop for President-elect Donald Trump’s rally last weekend.

Colby Cooper, who has served as Stimpson’s chief of staff since 2013, says he became “overzealous” in making sure every detail was covered for the weekend’s rally.

Alabama members of the Electoral College are gathering to cast their votes for Donald Trump.

Electoral College members will meet at state capitals across the country to cast their votes for president. Alabama Republican Party Chairwoman Terry Lathan said the state's electors are "rock solid 100 percent" behind Trump.             

Trump won Alabama with more than 62 percent of the vote. All of Alabama's nine electors told The Associated Press that they intend to stick with Trump. 

President-elect Donald Trump is coming to Alabama this weekend as part of his post-election victory tour. Trump will hold a rally in Mobile at 3 p.m. Saturday.  

The event will be held at the 40,000-seat Ladd-Peebles Stadium.

The stadium was the site of one of Trump's first large rallies of the presidential campaign. The Trump campaign says the visit is a way to say thank you to voters. Alabama overwhelmingly supported Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the November election.

Bentley preparing to interview Senate candidates

Dec 13, 2016

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he is preparing to interview potential replacements for U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions.

The governor says the interviews could begin as soon as this week. He has not decided how many candidates he will interview.

President-elect Donald Trump named Sessions as his attorney general. Sessions is expected to step down once he is confirmed.

Alabama AG Strange seeks to replace Sessions in Senate

Dec 6, 2016

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says he will seek the U.S. Senate seat left open if incumbent Jeff Sessions is confirmed to be attorney general under president-elect Donald Trump.

Gov. Robert Bentley would appoint Sessions' interim replacement until there's an election to fill the rest of the term. That election would be held next year or in 2018.

Strange issued a statement Tuesday saying he will be a candidate for the position and already has filed the necessary paperwork with federal election officials.

Trump's staff picks disappoint, alarm minority groups

Nov 18, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump's picks for staff positions in his administration are alarming civil rights leaders who say his choices could turn back the clock on social issues.

Trump's picks include Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions for attorney general, alt-right architect Stephen Bannon as senior adviser and chief strategist, and former Army Lt. Michael Flynn as national security adviser.

President-elect Donald Trump is reportedly offering the post of U.S. Attorney General to Alabama U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions, one of Trump's closest and most consistent allies.

That's according to a senior Trump official, who was not authorized to speak publicly about the conversation. The official wouldn't say whether Sessions had accepted the job, which left open the possibility that the arrangement was not finalized.

Sessions was the first senator to openly endorse Trump and was a close adviser throughout the campaign.

Bentley approached by people seeking Senate appointment

Nov 16, 2016

A spokeswoman for Gov. Robert Bentley says the administration has already been approached by "several" people seeking appointment to U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions' Senate seat if he takes a position in the incoming Trump administration.

Sessions has not taken a position with the President-Elect, but the mere possibility has set off a political chain reaction.

Trump garners record vote count in Alabama

Nov 16, 2016

History was made last week in Alabama as more than 1.3 million votes were cast in the state for President-Elect Donald Trump.  That is the highest amount any candidate for President has ever received in Alabama, according to Secretary of State John Merrill.

Merrill attributes some of the high vote count for Trump to a surge in late registrations, after more than half a million people signed up to vote within the last year…

Trump wins Presidency

Nov 9, 2016

Donald Trump has been elected president of the United States.

The Republican nominee won  after capturing Wisconsin's 10 electoral votes, putting him over the 270 threshold.

Voters eager to shake up the nation's political establishment picked the celebrity businessman to become the nation's 45th president.

Trump rode an astonishing wave of support from voters seeking change and willing to accept a candidate loose with facts and accused of sexual misconduct.

He upset Democrat Hillary Clinton, who would have become the first woman to serve in the Oval Office.

Donald Trump wins Alabama

Nov 8, 2016

Donald Trump has won Alabama's presidential election, continuing the Republican streak in the Deep South state.

Trump easily defeated Hillary Clinton on Tuesday.

Trump was long the favorite in the deeply red state, considered one of the safest for Republicans. Alabama hasn't voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Trump and Clinton both visited the state several times during the hard-fought primary battles.

      

           Alabama was a popular destination for those seeking the presidency this year. Republicans and Democrats made it a point to visit the Yellowhammer State to try and keep it red or turn it blue. This of course means news coverage, which in turn, brings out cartoonists. If you follow sites like Al-dot-com you’ll see the work of one man in particular…

            “Never dreamed I’d get a job drawing editorial cartoons, political, I’m not really that political by nature, I just make fun of everything.”

Gov. Bentley
Albert Cesare / Associated Press

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he can no longer vote for Donald Trump in the wake of the Republican presidential nominee's comments about women.

Bentley joined Alabama U.S. Representatives Martha Roby and Bradley Byrne yesterday calling for Trump to step aside from the presidential race. Trump is under fire for a leaked audio recording from 2005 in which he brags about groping and trying to seduce married women.

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