November is National Diabetes Month

Nov 1, 2017

November is National Diabetes Month and health officials say that should serve as a wake-up call to Alabama especially.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Alabama has one of the highest rates of diabetes in the country at over twelve percent. The National Diabetes Education Program is promoting a campaign to encourage diabetics to take control of their condition through education and awareness.

Dr. Griffin Rodgers is an expert on diabetes at the National Institutes of Health. He says a lack of awareness about the disease can be especially dangerous.

Mobile adults have highest rate of diabetes

Dec 1, 2016

The City of Mobile has the highest rate of diabetes within the last year.  That’s according to a new study that surveyed nearly 200 communities across the country last year.

A Gallup-Healthways report released yesterday says 17.7 percent of adults in Mobile in 2015 had diabetes.

The report found the overall incidence of diabetes in U.S. adults has grown from 10.6 percent in 2008 to 11.5 percent.

A newly-created panel is trying to find ways to make it easier for nearly 2 million Alabamians to eat healthier food.

The Alabama Healthy Food Financing Initiative Study Commission met this week to address the problem of so-called "food deserts" in the state. State lawmakers created the commission earlier this year.

The group will consult with retailers and health experts to develop projects that could be sent to the state legislature as recommendations for action during the next legislative session beginning in February.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating an accident that occurred during the Tuscaloosa Air Show yesterday.

Two small stunt planes collided during an aerobatic performance by Team Aerodynamix at the Tuscaloosa Regional Air Show yesterday.


Alabama has one of the worst rates of diabetes in the nation.  Harvard doctor Osama Hamdy says the rate of diabetes has increased 82 percent in the nation over the last 15 years.  And Alabama has seen an increase of about 140 percent.  Hamdy says one key to battling the problem is tackling its chief driver: obesity.  The other is increased activity.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Wikimedia Commons

The nation's diabetes problem is getting worse, and health officials say the biggest changes have been in Oklahoma and a number of Southern states.

The diabetes rate in Oklahoma more than tripled over 15 years, and also boomed in Southern states like Kentucky, Georgia and Alabama.

Most cases are the kind of diabetes linked to obesity. Health officials believe extra weight explains the increases in the South and Southwest. They also say the rates overall are up because people with diabetes are living longer.