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Officials in Atlanta say the city's computer systems are not yet fully operational after a ransomware attack hit the city last week and locked some city data behind a wall of encryption.

Tasnim Shamma of member station WABE in Atlanta tells our Newscast unit that cybersecurity experts are working around the clock to restore access to the city's data.

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The U.S. stock market rocketed higher yesterday as fears of a possible trade war between the U.S. and China eased. As NPR's John Ydstie reports, the two countries have begun talks aimed at avoiding tit-for-tat sanctions that could damage both sides.

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Tumblr has listed a number of accounts linked to Russian social media agitation giving the newest look at a sophisticated effort to sow discord among Americans — including black users.

The blogging service announced that it had discovered more than 80 accounts linked to the Internet Research Agency, the professional troll farm indicted by Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller.

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET

The Federal Trade Commission confirmed Monday that it is investigating the possible misuse of the personal information of as many as 50 million Facebook users. The probe comes after the social network admitted it suspended a firm that worked on behalf of the Trump campaign to use personal information gathered on Facebook to target potential Trump supporters.

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On this week's All Tech Considered, what are you doing about your Facebook account after the Cambridge Analytica revelations?

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Why To Care If There Are Tariffs

Mar 26, 2018

First, President Trump imposed tariffs on Chinese imports, with hopes of narrowing the trade deficit. Then China responded, with tariffs on wine, pork, pipes and more.

Then the market reacted.

Organizers of the "March For Our Lives" rally in Washington put the early cost estimate for the event at $5 million, and said they have "several million dollars" left to continue to push for stricter gun laws and fight gun violence.

Deena Katz, a Hollywood producer who became involved in the early stages of planning for the march, said fundraising efforts have been successful enough to ensure continued lobbying and other activism. She did not cite a specific amount, saying donations were still being tallied.

Dollars for Data

Mar 26, 2018

When you get directions from Google Maps or post a photo of the sunset on Instagram, it may not cost you any money but you are paying with something else: your data. Tech companies get to know where you go, what you like, and who you're with.

You may think that's a pretty good trade off, but economist Glen Weyl thinks it's about time we started getting paid for that data. He envisions a world where your posts and likes could be converted into dollars and cents.

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. Here's a couple of memorable moments from the 2012 presidential campaign.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Corporations...

Contract workers and freelancers have few legal rights, compared with those hired as employees. Under federal law, a contract worker lacks the right to sue for sexual harassment or gender discrimination, for example, because workplace civil rights laws do not apply.

Updated at 4:05 p.m. ET

U.S. stock indexes surged about 3 percent Monday after fears eased of a trade war with China. The two big trading partners reportedly are negotiating to improve U.S. access to Chinese markets.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the U.S. and China have "quietly started negotiating" and that U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is considering a trip to Beijing for talks.

It's a blustery day in the border town of Mexicali in Baja California, Mexico, and five men are huddled inside a makeshift encampment covered with protest signs outside the city's government offices. The intense wind makes the tarps serving as walls flap loudly, like Batman's cape as he propels down a building. And just like Batman, they say they're there for justice.

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Firearms manufacturer Remington Outdoor has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in hopes of staving off creditors amid a slump in sales and public outcry over gun violence.

Reuters reports that Remington's creditors, including Franklin Templeton Investments and JPMorgan Asset Management, have agreed to exchange debt for equity in the company.

Remington was founded in 1816 in upstate New York and is one of the largest and oldest U.S. producers of firearms. It was bought in 2007 by Cerberus Capital Management for $118 million.

Ride-hailing service Uber Technologies will sell its business in Southeast Asia to regional rival Grab, the firm said in a statement early Monday, ceding the region's 640 million potential riders to others.

Grab is a rapidly expanding ride-sharing, food delivery and financial services provider in the region. Uber said it would take a 27.5 percent stake in Grab as part of the deal, according to Reuters.

Sunita Williams wasn't the kind of kid who wanted to be an astronaut when she grew up. She wanted to be a veterinarian. But she managed to achieve the former kid's dream job, anyway.

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ChapStick, Viagra and dandruff shampoo. These are just three of the thousands of health and personal care items that are exempt from sales tax in many U.S. states. Notably missing from that list: menstrual products.

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Autumn Weese thinks she was fired last month, but she isn't entirely sure. Weese told her boss at an Arkansas coffee shop she needed to cut back her hours as she pursued her master's degree.

"The last email I got from her said that she ... 'totally understood the situation,' " Weese says. But then colleagues started telling her how sorry they were to hear she was leaving in two weeks. That was when Weese started suspecting she had been fired.

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The recent revelations that personal data from about 50 million Facebook users were used by a data analytics firm working for the Trump campaign are making a lot of the social network's users uneasy.

Some are wondering if there's a better way to limit who can access their personal information.

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