Business & Education

NPR Story
4:03 am
Wed June 10, 2015

EPA, Farmers Divided Over Proposed Ethanol Standards

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 7:01 am

Copyright 2015 Nebraska Public Radio Network. To see more, visit http://netnebraska.org/basic-page/radio/radio.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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Europe
4:03 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Drop In Demand Leads To Layoffs In Russia's Auto Market

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 7:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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The Salt
4:01 am
Wed June 10, 2015

For Bakers And Restaurants, Egg Supply Is Getting Ugly

Cartons of eggs are stacked on shelves at Laurenzo's Italian Center, May 21, 2015, in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 12:23 pm

Tony Lordi sighs as he reaches into the pocket of his white uniform pants and pulls out his iPhone.

These days, Lordi, the production manager at Judy's Bakery in Kansas City, Mo., checks with his supplier every day. He needs to know the price of what's become liquid gold for commercial bakers: "liquid egg."

"The market's like gas prices at this point," he says.

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All Tech Considered
4:00 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Businesses Are Hanging Up On Voice Mail To Dial In Productivity

That little red "message" light may not be as ubiquitous in offices as it used to be.
Photo illustration: Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Originally published on Wed June 10, 2015 8:58 am

A few short years after voice mail was developed in the late 1970s, it quickly became an essential business tool.

But in the past few years, its use has been in decline. And some offices have opted to get rid of it altogether.

After JPMorgan Chase said last week it was canceling voice mail for most of its employees, I sent the bank's public relations department an email.

A bit later, there was that familiar red light on my desk phone:

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All Tech Considered
5:07 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

How Apple Hopes To Take A Bite Out Of The News Business

Susan Prescott, Apple vice president of product management and marketing, demonstrates the News app during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco on Monday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 6:01 pm

What if there were an app where a user could have all of the news he was interested in, from the outlets he trusted, all in one place?

That's the goal of Apple's new iOS 9 feature, called, simply, News. It will be a permanent fixture on the iPhone and iPad home screen, just like Calendar, Maps and Weather.

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Around the Nation
4:55 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

New Jersey's Top Court Rules In Favor Of Gov. Christie On Pensions

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 5:57 pm

New Jersey's highest court ruled Tuesday that Gov. Chris Christie does not have to pay more money into the state's pension funds. The decision overturns a lower court's ruling that favored the unions who brought the lawsuit.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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The Salt
3:08 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Monsanto, Angling For Global Pesticide Dominance, Woos Syngenta

Central Illinois corn and soybean farmer Tim Seifert loads his field planter with Syngenta insecticide while planting seed corn in 2011. Monsanto has made a bid to buy Syngenta for its pesticide business.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 4:18 pm

Selling seeds and pesticides used to be a sleepy, slow-moving business. That was, until about 20 years ago, when the chemical company Monsanto introduced genetically modified crops and started buying up seed companies. Ever since, companies in this industry have been maneuvering like hungry fish in a pond, occasionally dining on pieces of each other, hoping to survive through size and speed.

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Parallels
2:36 pm
Tue June 9, 2015

Anxious About China, Asian Nations Buy More U.S. Military Hardware

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter, right, and Vietnam's Defense Minister Phung Quang Thanh review the guard of honour during a welcoming ceremony at the Defense Ministry in Hanoi, Vietnam, on June 1. The U.S., Russia, France, the U.K. and other countries are all jockeying to sell military equipment to Southeast Asian countries.
Hoang Dinh Nam Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 5:57 pm

Southeast Asia is becoming a booming market for U.S. defense companies. Countries such as Vietnam, Malaysia and Thailand are spending billions to upgrade and expand their defense systems. At the heart of this shopping spree is anxiety over China.

But American defense companies have plenty of competition.

Southeast Asian countries have been steadily building up their defense systems over the past decade — some more than others. But the pace has picked up recently, says Anthony Nelson, with the U.S.-ASEAN Business Council.

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It's All Politics
11:23 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Here's How Inflation Has Eroded American Workers' Overtime Eligibility

Sheila Abramson serves customers of Langer's Delicatessen in Los Angeles in 2013.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 2:23 pm

President Obama is once again poised to go it alone on labor policy, this time on overtime. The Labor Department is expected in the coming weeks to release a rule making millions more Americans eligible for overtime work — currently, all workers earning below $455 a week, or $23,660 a year, are guaranteed time-and-a-half pay for working more than 40 hours a week. The law may raise that as high as $52,000, Politico reports.

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Shots - Health News
10:01 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Highest-Charging U.S. Hospitals Are For-Profit And Concentrated In Florida

Talk about sticker shock: Some U.S. hospitals charge patients more than 10 times the rates paid by Medicare.

Of the 50 U.S. hospitals with the highest charges, 49 are for-profit institutions, 20 operate in Florida, and half are owned by a single chain, according to a study published in the journal Health Affairs Monday.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Apple Jumps Into The Music Streaming Business

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 1:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now to some news about how you get your music. Apple has jumped into the streaming music business. It announced the new service, Apple Music, at its developers conference yesterday in San Francisco. And as NPR's Laura Sydell reports, DJs may be key to its success.

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Shots - Health News
2:47 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Some States Make Obamacare Backup Plans, As Supreme Court Decision Looms

Michael Carvin (right), lead attorney for the petitioners speaking before the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The justices heard arguments in King v. Burwell.
Dana Verkouteren AP

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 1:18 pm

Online health insurance marketplaces are central parts of the Affordable Care Act. And HealthCare.gov, the federally run exchange, is where 27-year-old Kathryn Ryan, a restaurant server in Philadelphia, turned for health coverage, as soon as the law took effect.

"I was excited because if it weren't for Obamacare, I wouldn't be insured at all," she says. "I wouldn't have the ability to go to the doctor."

She can afford health insurance thanks to a $200 a month subsidy that brings her premium down to $60 a month.

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NPR Ed
2:42 am
Tue June 9, 2015

This Summer, The Cafeteria Comes To The Kids

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 7:08 am

"Chow bus! Chow bus! Chow bus!" chants Gunner Fischer, 3, as a custom-painted school bus rounds the corner and rumbles toward his apartment complex in Murfreesboro, Tenn.

About 21 million students nationwide eat free and reduced-price meals throughout the school year, but getting those same kids fed during the summer is a challenge. Only a fraction of those make it to schools or community centers for summer meals.

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Around the Nation
2:40 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Texas Cattle Ranchers Whipsawed Between Drought And Deluge

Cattle stand in floodwaters at 44 Farms in Cameron, Texas. The water demolished fences and ruined crops planted as feed.
Katlin Mazzocco 44 Farms

Originally published on Tue June 9, 2015 7:08 am

The drought finally broke for Texas ranchers late last year. The range and pasturelands on which cattle graze began to recover. Then came the spring. In Cameron, about 140 miles northwest of Houston, the rain began falling at the start of May — and didn't stop all month.

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U.S.
2:38 am
Tue June 9, 2015

For Baltimore Businesses, Aid For Riot Repair Is Not Coming Fast Enough

Volunteers clean up a business damaged during an evening of riots following the funeral of Freddie Gray on April 28 in Baltimore.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 8:57 pm

It took only minutes for stores in Baltimore to be destroyed on the night of April 27. But six weeks later, the repair process is still limping along. And stores not directly affected by the violence say they've also seen a sharp decline in business.

"Look outside, there's nobody," says Pedro Silva, owner of Carolina's Tex-Mex Restaurant in Fells Point, a usually busy tourist spot. "Before, we used to be no parking space. Now it's empty. It's empty — day, night."

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