Business & Education

Business
4:07 am
Mon September 24, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Dow Jones industrial average may be the most famous barometer of stock market sentiment. It's not a broad measure. Only 30 stocks are in the Dow and this elite group of big blue chip companies supposedly represents the health of the U.S. economy. So, it is noteworthy when a company is kicked off the Dow or allowed in.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Asia
4:07 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Signs Emerge Of Economic Change In North Korea

Workers plant rice at a co-op farm in Nampo, North Korea, on May 12. The North Korean leadership has given indications that it may be preparing to implement measures to liberalize the country's economy.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

An unusual parliamentary meeting is due to open Tuesday in Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, amid speculation of sweeping changes ahead. In the first such confirmation from within the country, farmers told The Associated Press they would be given more control over their crops under new agricultural rules. Long seen as an economic basket case, North Korea now could be on the cusp of economic change.

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All Tech Considered
2:23 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Employee Shopping: 'Acqui-Hire' Is The New Normal In Silicon Valley

A Google logo is seen through windows of Moscone Center in San Francisco during Google's annual developer conference, Google I/O, in June. Google is one of several major tech companies known for the "acqui-hire."
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

Tech companies like Google, Facebook and Zynga are on a shopping spree. They're buying small startups with innovative products and apps. But, many times, the tech giants don't care about what the small companies were producing. They just want the engineers.

There's a new name for these deals: the "acqui-hire," and it could mean the end to your favorite app.

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Europe
6:54 am
Sun September 23, 2012

Italy's Fiat Woes A Symptom Of Industrial Malady

Automaker Fiat threatened to shutter operations in Italy.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 12:22 pm

Automaker Fiat announced its commitment to remain in Italy after a meeting Saturday between the company's CEO and the country's president.

Fiat had threatened to shut down its operations in Italy unless it received additional state assistance. The crisis came at a time the entire country is undergoing a steep decline across all industrial sectors.

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Asia
4:38 am
Sun September 23, 2012

McDonald's In India: Would You Like Paneer On That?

The McAloo Tikki will be available at the forthcoming vegetarian-only McDonald's restaurants in India.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 4:22 pm

When you walk into a McDonald's in India, it doesn't feel that much different from one in the U.S. That is, until you try to order.

When McDonald's first came to India 15 years ago, it ditched the Big Macs and Quarter Pounders to try to fit in in a country where cows are sacred and most people frown on eating beef. The chain tried re-creating its American classics with lamb, but it was a flop.

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Education
7:23 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Duncan On Chicago: 'When Adults Fight, Kids Lose'

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 9:35 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Chicago teachers voted to end their strike this week, the first in 25 years, and came back to class. It brought an end to a heated confrontation between leaders of the Chicago teachers union and Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who repeated this phrase time and again during the strike.

MAYOR RAHM EMANUEL: This was a strike of choice and it's a wrong choice for the children. Really, it was a choice.

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Africa
6:21 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Labor Unrest In S. African Mines Spreads

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 9:35 am

In South Africa, thousands of mineworkers have embarked on industrial action that began with a deadly pay strike by platinum workers. They've agreed a wage deal with their management, this week, but the labor unrest is spreading to other platinum and gold mines in an industry that's the engine of South Africa's economy. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton discusses the repercussions with host Scott Simon.

Europe
4:34 am
Sat September 22, 2012

'Time Banks' Help Spaniards Weather Financial Crisis

Unemployment is rampant in Spain and full-time jobs are scarce. Here a woman works at a street stall in Madrid. Some Spaniards are signing up for "time banks," where individuals perform services based on their skills, and receive another service in return. No money changes hands. A woman is shown here working at a street stall in Madrid.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 9:35 am

After saving money for years, Lola Sanchez was finally able to buy a car refitted with a ramp and space for a wheelchair in the back for her teenage son, who has cerebral palsy.

A nurse used to come each day to help with her son's care. That service was cut amid government austerity measures, though Sanchez still gets a small check every month.

"What I need is physical help, even more than financial assistance," Sanchez says, "because I can't physically lift him on my own."

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The Record
5:37 pm
Fri September 21, 2012

Universal's Purchase Of EMI Gets Thumbs Up In U.S. And Europe

The catalog of The Beatles, which was owned by EMI, will be among the assets that the Universal Music Group gets to keep.
Jim Gray Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 2:20 pm

And then there were three — record labels, that is. Regulators in the United States and Europe have approved the acquisition of EMI Music by Univeral Music Group. The combined label will own close to 40 percent of the world music market with a trove of acts that includes The Beatles.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Fri September 21, 2012

Kickstarter Says It 'Is Not A Store' As It Revises Policy On Projects' Risks

A screengrab shows three highly funded Design projects currently on Kickstarter's site. The company's founder say they will require more information about the challenges potential entrepreneurs could face.
NPR

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 10:06 pm

Even as it has received praise for bringing innovative ideas to life, Kickstarter has been criticized for allowing creators to be a little fuzzy about their plans — and for providing little recourse to investors who become unsatisfied with the project they've supported. The site has now announced changes that it hopes will ease those troubles.

The biggest change is a new section called "Risks and Challenges," which requires potential entrepreneurs to list the obstacles they face, and how they plan to deal with them.

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The Two-Way
8:49 am
Fri September 21, 2012

Another iPhone, Another Day Of Long Lines And Big Hype

In Tokyo today, a customer on line for the iPhone 5 was wearing a Steve Jobs mask.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 9:51 am

It's a "now familiar global ritual," as The Associated Press says: Apple fans are lining up today at stores "from Sydney to Paris to pick up the tech juggernaut's latest iPhone."

That would be the iPhone 5, which the company unveiled earlier this month.

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The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Senate Report: Multinationals, Including Microsoft, Avoided Billions In Taxes

Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP

According to a Senate investigations subcommittee, Microsoft Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co. and other multinational corporations took advantage of an ambiguous U.S. tax code to avoid paying billions of dollars in taxes.

Here's how Bloomberg wraps it up:

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Two-Year Colleges
4:42 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Ala.'s 2-Year College Head To Earn $271K A Year

Board votes on new two-year college chancellor Mark Heinrich's salary.
Shelton State Community College

The new chancellor of Alabama's two-year college system will receive more than $270,000 a year.

Mark Heinrich has agreed to a three-year contract that will pay him $250,000 annually in salary. It will also provide a yearly housing allowance of $21,000.

The State Board of Education approved the deal Thursday. Heinrich has agreed to the terms but still has to sign the contract.

The board voted last week to hire Heinrich, who has been president of Shelton State Community College in Tuscaloosa.

Business
11:35 am
Thu September 20, 2012

Is Putting Politics On Display Bad For Business?

A used-car lot displays a sign in support of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Manchester, N.H., in January.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 11:43 am

Every election season, political signs sprout like dandelions from lawns across America. They also pop up at more than a few businesses. For some, expressing political preferences is a calculated move to attract customers. But it can just as easily turn clients away.

Jeff Reiter, who owns the Blue Plate Lunch Counter & Soda Fountain in Portland, Ore., proudly displays a 2008 Obama campaign sign inside his restaurant and says he has "never tried to hide" his support for the president.

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The Two-Way
11:31 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Teachers, Students Head Back To School In Chicago

Students at Frazier International Magnet School wait outside before the start of school on Wednesday in Chicago.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Tens of thousands of students are back in school this morning in Chicago.

As we told you yesterday, the Chicago Teachers Union voted to end the seven-day walkout. This morning, reports The Chicago Sun-Times, everyone was excited to get back to normal — the teachers, the students and even the mayor.

The Sun-Times reports:

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