Business & Education

Around the Nation
4:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Residents Of Hot Weather States Sweat Air Conditioning Bills

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Air conditioning is increasingly becoming a necessity, not a luxury, as the number of Americans living in the Sunbelt grows. In Arizona, many people are struggling to keep up with their utility bills. The federal government does have an energy assistance program, but funding is shrinking, and it favors cold weather states that need heating help.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports.

Read more
Business
4:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Amgen To Buy Onyx In $10.4 Billion Deal

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a major biotech deal.

Amgen, the world's largest biotech company, is buying Onyx Pharmaceuticals for nearly $10.5 billion.

As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, Amgen has high hopes for Onyx's cancer drugs.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: Amgen has cancer-related medicines, but for the most part they relieve side effects of chemotherapy, they don't act on the cancer itself.

And analyst Mark Schoenebaum of the stock research firm ISI Group says Amgen wanted a piece of that action.

Read more
Business
4:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Cats Plus Online Videos Equal Precious

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 1:23 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our Last Word In Business today is click catnip. Ten thousand people turned out at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis last summer for the first Internet Cat Video Festival.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It was such a success, they have brought it back. Scott Stulen runs it and thinks cats and online videos, they just work together.

Read more
The Salt
2:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 1:49 pm

Across the High Plains, many farmers depend on underground stores of water, and they worry about wells going dry. A new scientific study of western Kansas lays out a predicted timeline for those fears to become reality. But it also shows an alternative path for farming in Kansas: The moment of reckoning can be delayed, and the impact softened, if farmers start conserving water now.

Read more
Planet Money
11:16 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

A College Kid, A Single Mom, And The Problem With The Poverty Line

Marion Matthew is a home health aide supporting herself and her 17-year-old son.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:02 am

The College Kid

Rico Saccoccio is a junior at Fordham University in the Bronx. He's from a middle-class family in Connecticut and he spent the summer living at home with his parents, who cover about $15,000 a year in his college costs.

According to the U.S. government, Saccoccio is living in poverty. The $8,000 he earns doing odd jobs puts him well below the $11,945 poverty threshold for an individual. In fact, the U.S. Census Bureau recently reported that more than half of all college students who are living off campus and not at home are poor.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Which U.S. Agencies Have Taken The Most Furlough Days?

In May, the Housing and Urban Development agency closed for a day, as employees were placed on furlough. The HUD and other agencies were reportedly forced to take a fraction of the furlough days that had been threatened earlier in 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 8:36 am

The threat of furloughs loomed large early in 2013, when mandatory budget cuts seemed certain to force federal workers to skip anywhere from 10 to 22 days of work without pay this year. A new tally by Federal News Radio shows that many agencies have taken fewer than half the days they had predicted.

Read more
Remembrances
3:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Muriel Siebert Was One Of the First Women Of Wall Street

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Muriel Siebert, the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, died over the weekend in Manhattan. She was 84. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, Siebert was a pioneer who broke down numerous doors in the male-dominated world of Wall Street.

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Inside The 'Bossless' Office, Where The Team Takes Charge

The headquarters of Menlo Innovations, a software design firm in Ann Arbor, Mich. At Menlo, there are no cubicles, few walls and no offices.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 1:44 pm

Cubicle culture can be so confining that it's become a cliche. A line from the cult film classic Office Space sums it up: "I have eight different bosses right now," grouses bleary-eyed tech company employee Peter Gibbons. "So that means when I make a mistake, I have eight different people coming by to tell me about it. That's my only real motivation. It's not to be hassled."

Read more
Business & Education
7:32 am
Mon August 26, 2013

UA Journalism Professor to be Interim Dean

Jennifer Greer will serve as interim dean of UA's communications program starting September 1.
Michelle Lepianka Carter | The Tuscaloosa News

A University of Alabama journalism professor has been named interim dean of the university's communications program.

   The Tuscaloosa News reports (http://bit.ly/1fdCHHR ) Jennifer Greer will take the helm of the College of Communication and Information Sciences on Sept. 1. Greer chairs the school's journalism department.

   Greer will replace outgoing Dean Loy Singleton who's set to retire on Oct. 31. She will work with Singleton until his retirement and then will run the college until a permanent replacement is found.

Read more
Business & Education
7:26 am
Mon August 26, 2013

UNA Addresses Parking Shortage with App, Shuttles

The University of North Alabama is using a smartphone app and shuttle buses to address a shortage of parking spaces.
www.waaytv.com

The University of North Alabama is using a smartphone app and shuttle buses to address a shortage of parking spaces.

   WAAY-TV (http://bit.ly/1dg1IGB ) reports the school has lost about 300 on-campus parking spaces because of construction and is using five shuttle buses to move students across campus from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. five days a week.

   Students who use a free iPhone and Android application the school began offering can use their phones to find out when the next shuttle bus is scheduled to arrive at their stop.

Read more
Business
3:51 am
Mon August 26, 2013

First Female Member Of NYSE Muriel Siebert Dies At 80

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 6:02 am

Muriel "Mickie" Siebert bought a seat on the exchange in 1967 and was also the first woman to head one of its member firms. She died Saturday in New York at age 80. The cause was complications of cancer.

Business
3:51 am
Mon August 26, 2013

India's Currency Drops Following U.S. Fed Shift In Policy

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 5:06 am

The problems were triggered when the Federal Reserve said it would soon ease bond buying. Renee Montagne talks to Amy Kazmin, a correspondent for the Financial Times in New Delhi, about the troubles with India's economy.

Business
3:51 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Fed Decision Sends Brazil's Currency Lower

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 4:40 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We'll begin NPR's business news with collapsing currencies.

Over the past several months, the focus of financial markets has been the Federal Reserve's plan to phase out or taper some of the extraordinary measures it has taken to stimulate the economy.

Just the idea that the Fed might start dialing back on stimulus spending is rippling through financial markets overseas. For instance, investors who once poured money into emerging markets, like Brazil and India, are suddenly much more cautious.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:51 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Too Much Rain Washes Out Crops In The South

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 4:10 am

Parts of the South have seen record rainfall this year. After years of drought, you'd think all that rain would be a good thing. But too much of the wet stuff is bad for farmers' crops.

Sports
4:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Quitting Your Job For Fantasy Football

Fantasy sports attract an estimated 36+ million players in the U.S. and Canada.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 5:04 pm

You may just call it late summer; for many die-hard sports fans, it's called fantasy football drafting season.

Fantasy sports is a huge business, with an estimated 36 million people in the U.S. and Canada picking teams and talkin' trash, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association.

And now we may be at a tipping point.

One man - Drew Dinkmeyer - actually left his job as an investment analyst to play fantasy sports full-time.

Read more

Pages