Arts & Life

Fine Art
5:25 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

In Detroit's Rivera And Kahlo Exhibit, A Portrait Of A Resilient City

A detail from the north wall of Diego Rivera's Detroit Industry murals shows workers on the automobile assembly line. After Detroit declared bankruptcy, the murals were at risk of being sold. Click here for a larger view.
Detroit Institute of Arts

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 7:01 pm

This weekend, visitors to the Detroit Institute of Arts buzzed with excitement over a new exhibit — it was a big moment for the once-troubled museum. The DIA spent much of the last two years under threat as its owner, the city of Detroit, looked for ways to emerge from bankruptcy.

Finally, in November, a "grand bargain" was struck. Foundations, private donors and the state of Michigan together raised more than $800 million to help rescue public employee pensions. In return, ownership of the DIA was transferred to a trust — thereby securing its future.

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Book News & Features
2:08 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

There's No Wrong Place To Start Reading Pratchett

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 3:15 pm

Whenever people talk about Terry Pratchett — as they've been doing a great deal since his death last week at age 66 — someone inevitably asks, "Where should I start reading his work?"

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Television
2:04 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Does Success Of HBO's 'The Jinx' Herald New Form Of True-Crime TV?

Robert Durst, filmed on the streets of Manhattan for HBO's The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst.
HBO

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 6:25 am

It was the kind of moment true-crime TV fans live for but almost never get to see: a suspected murderer seeming to confess his guilt while the audience listens in.

That bombshell admission aired Sunday at the end of HBO's docu-series The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, capping a six-part series. It unfolded as something of a cat-and-mouse game between Durst, the scion of a wealthy New York family who is suspected of killing his wife, a best friend and a neighbor in separate crimes reaching back to 1982, and filmmaker Andrew Jarecki.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Elton John Leads Boycott Against Dolce & Gabbana Over 'Synthetic Children' Remarks

Stefano Gabbana (left) and Domenico Dolce, seen here during the recent Milan Fashion Week, are being criticized for remarks about same-sex families, sparking a boycott led by musician Elton John.
Daniel Dal Zennaro EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 12:43 am

Fashion designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana are locked in a very public argument with musician Elton John over their recent remarks condemning in vitro fertilization and saying same-sex couples should not raise children.

After John called for a boycott of the designers' clothes, Gabbana defended his right to air an opinion and urged people to shun the singer, responding to John's Instagram post by commenting, "Fascist!!"

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The Salt
12:45 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Sandwich Monday: Bone-In Pork Chop Sandwich

The bone stays in, the grease goes everywhere.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 2:09 pm

There are dangerous sandwiches out there: the Wendy's Sharpened Chicken Classic, the McRib that's always sending you emails with questionable attachments. But they pale in comparison to the famous pork chop sandwich from Jim's Original in Chicago: Jim leaves the bone in.

Eva: The bone also serves as a useful sandwich handle.

Miles: Eating a bone-in sandwich is the lazy person's equivalent of free-climbing a mountain. The danger just adds to the rush.

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It's All Politics
12:40 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Barney Frank's Journey From Closeted To An Openly Gay Member Of Congress

Michael Halsband Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 2:49 pm

In 1972, former Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., decided he would run for the state Legislature in Massachusetts — but he also explicitly decided to stay in the closet. And as he made this decision, he made a promise to himself to support LGBT rights.

"I could not live with myself if I did not oppose the discrimination," Frank tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

That year, two organizations asked candidates for the state Legislature if they would sponsor a gay rights bill. Frank says he enthusiastically agreed, expecting a senior member to take the lead.

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The Salt
11:24 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Looks Matter: A Century Of Iconic Food Packaging

Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 12:49 pm

We take the packaging our food comes in for granted. Yet many of the boxes, bags and bottles that protect our edibles were once groundbreaking — both in their design and in how they changed our perception of what's inside. Sometimes, packaging is so distinctive, it transforms food from mere consumer product to cultural icon. As Stephen Heller, author of more than 100 books on design and popular culture, says, "Coca-Cola is not a bottle of soda — it's Coca-Cola."

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Arts & Life
10:38 am
Mon March 16, 2015

A Polka Revival In Cleveland

The Chardon Polka Band rocks out at the 2014 Cleveland Oktoberfest. (chardonpolkaband.com)

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 1:58 pm

For some people, the accordion has long been associated with smiling musicians in suits on Lawrence Welk Show re-runs, or with men in lederhosen and alpine hats.

More contemporary performers like the Pogues and Golgo Bordello have tried to put a modern spin this traditional sound. Now, a young band from the Cleveland area is building a national following with its version of accordion music.

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Arts & Life
10:36 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Matt Haimovitz & Christopher O'Riley: Tiny Desk Concert

Carlos Waters NPR

Originally published on Sat March 14, 2015 4:31 am

Whether it's warranted or not, classical music wonks are perennially worried about the next generation of fans.

It seems there's less need to fret when you hear cellist Matt Haimovitz and pianist Christopher O'Riley. Some 15 years ago, they were already chipping away at the barriers — both real and perceived — between classical and pop.

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Newscast
8:59 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Birmingham hosts disease symposium, turkey hunt begins tomorrow and Gulf states talk red snapper

Dr. Bruce Korf, chairman of UAB's Department of Genetics

Experts on rare childhood diseases will be meeting in Birmingham today.

UAB and Children’s of Alabama are hosting a symposium on diseases that hit two hundred thousand or fewer patients a year. Those illnesses are considered rare. The symposium will be in commemoration of last month’s Rare Disease Day to raise awareness for rare diseases.

Dr. Bruce Korf is the chairman of the Department of Genetics at UAB. He says part of their mission is public outreach.

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Book Review
8:00 am
Mon March 16, 2015

What Stands in a Storm

Title:  What Stands in a Storm
Author:  Kim Cross

Transcript to be added soon.

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Television
4:55 am
Mon March 16, 2015

Documentary Filmmakers Worry About Being Squeezed Out Of PBS Prime Time

The popularity of Carson and company on the hit show Downton Abbey is tough for PBS documentary films to compete with. Some major markets — including New York — are considering moving those docs out of prime time.
WGBH/PBS

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 6:09 am

As PBS enjoys the success of shows like Downton Abbey and Antiques Roadshow, documentary filmmakers feel they're being marginalized.

Two signature documentary shows on PBS — POV and Independent Lens — air rigorous, in-depth reports about difficult issues often set in minority communities. They also enjoy a prime time slot on many stations, including New York City's WNET, one of the largest PBS member stations in the country.

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Architecture
2:09 am
Mon March 16, 2015

With Sunny, Modern Homes, Joseph Eichler Built The Suburbs In Style

After World War II, developer Joseph Eichler built well-designed and well-crafted tract homes that dotted California suburbs.
Stephen Schafer

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 2:24 pm

In Palm Springs, Calif., a $1 million home was just built — with plans resurrected from 1951. The original sold for about $15,000, and was called an Eichler, after developer Joseph Eichler, who offered well-designed, well-built tract homes to the masses a half-century ago.

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Author Interviews
4:17 pm
Sun March 15, 2015

'State Of Terror': Where ISIS Came From And How To Fight It

Heavy smoke rises following an airstrike by the U.S.-led coalition aircraft in Kobani, Syria, during fighting between Syrian Kurds and the militants of the self-declared Islamic State in October 2014.
Gokhan Sahin Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 11:34 am

There have been mixed results in the fight against the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS. Iraqi government forces and their Iranian allies are fighting to retake the central city of Tikrit, but it's unclear how much longer this will take.

Meanwhile, ISIS has established a foothold in Libya. They also recently accepted the allegiance of Boko Haram, a Nigerian terrorist organization.

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Movies
8:29 am
Sun March 15, 2015

Gather Ye Rosebuds: 'Citizen Kane' Screened At Hearst Castle

Hearst Castle, the estate of newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, hosted its first-ever screening of Citizen Kane on Friday. Hearst hated the movie, and never allowed it to be shown there during his lifetime.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 3:47 pm

Citizen Kane has been called the best film ever made. It was also at the center of an epic battle of egos.

The main character was modeled after media titan William Randolph Hearst, who in real life tried ruthlessly to keep the movie from being released.

Almost 75 years later, the family has called a truce, of sorts: This weekend, Citizen Kane was screened for the first time inside the millionaire's legendary home, the Hearst Castle.

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