Arts & Life

Newscast
5:07 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Prison Changes And Independence Day Volunteers

5pm Newscast

Thursday July 3, 2014

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Trudging Uphill With Two Men And The Weight Of History

The cast and crew of Beyond the Edge re-enacted Sir Edmund Hillary's (Chad Moffitt) historic climb on site at Mount Everest, and at Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park in New Zealand's Southern Alps.
Mark Whetu Sundance Selects

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:02 pm

With or without his knighthood, the legendary climber Sir Edmund Hillary stood 6-foot-plus in his stockinged feet and looked a bit like a mountain crag himself. The New Zealand beekeeper — who with his Sherpa guide Tenzing Norgay was in May 1953 the first to reach the top of Mount Everest — was possessed of a jutting lantern jaw, piercing eyes and an obstinate determination that served this self-described "rough old farm boy" well when holding his own against the posh British leaders who ran the expedition to crest the world's highest peak.

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

The Devil's In The Derails: 'Deliver Us,' Indeed

Based on the accounts given by a former NYPD sergeant, Deliver Us From Evil follows Ralph Sarchie, a New York police officer played by Eric Bana, as he investigates unexplainable crimes.
Andrew Schwartz Screen Gems

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:23 pm

For decades, cop dramas have depicted the South Bronx as the devil's playground. Deliver Us From Evil takes that idea all too literally. But then this slow-witted occult thriller takes everything literally, from the Catholic rite of exorcism to Jim Morrison's shamanic posturing.

The movie is derived from a book of the same name by former NYPD Sgt. Ralph Sarchie, who reportedly came to believe that some of the criminals he faced were literally possessed. Wisely, director and co-scripter Scott Derrickson made the on-screen Sarchie (stolidly intense Eric Bana) a skeptic.

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Melissa McCarthy, An Unstoppable Force Imperfectly Deployed In 'Tammy'

Melissa McCarthy co-wrote, produced and stars as the title character in Tammy -- a comedy about a woman on a felonious road trip with her alcoholic grandmother, played by Susan Sarandon (left).
Saeed Adyani Warner Brothers Pictures

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:29 pm

Think of Melissa McCarthy playing Megan in Bridesmaids, and you may first remember her defecating in a sink, or driving a minivan full of stolen puppies, or brazenly propositioning an air marshal. McCarthy stole the show with a talent for profanity and pratfalls, but it's a reflective one-on-one scene playing impromptu life coach to Kristen Wiig's character that solidified her star-making performance. For that scene, she dropped the clownish shtick for a real human moment that made Megan into a character, not just a caricature.

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:03 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Isolation Spells Frustration In Bertolucci's 'Me And You'

Lorenzo, a 14-year-old misfit played by Jacopo Olmo Antinori, adopts a new worldview after spending a week in his basement with his estranged half-sister, Olivia, played by Tea Falco.
Séverine Brigeot Emerging Pictures

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:49 pm

In his five decades as a director, Bernardo Bertolucci has tended toward grand political filmmaking. His movies have generally been set in turbulent times: the rise of fascism in Italy in The Conformist and 1900; the leftist youth movements of the 1960s in Partner and Before the Revolution; the years prior to the Chinese Communist revolution in The Last Emperor — moments when social orders are being overturned.

Read more
Alabama Plane Crash
3:40 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

No Distress Calls Made Before Alabama Plane Crash

Federal investigators say no distress calls were made by crew members before their plane crashed shortly after takeoff at Huntsville's airport, killing three people on board.
Credit NTSB

Federal investigators say no distress calls were made by crew members before their plane crashed shortly after takeoff at Huntsville's airport, killing three people on board.

A preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board says witnesses saw the 10-seat Westwind II aircraft climb to an estimated 50 to 200 feet, then roll to the right before it crashed June 18.

The NTSB report released Wednesday says the crew was doing training maneuvers, and the purpose was proficiency exams for two pilots.

Read more
Television
3:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Questlove And The Roots: How A Hip-Hop Band Conquered Late Night

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon." href="/post/questlove-and-roots-how-hip-hop-band-conquered-late-night" class="noexit lightbox">
Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson (center) appears with The Roots members Frank Knuckles (left) and Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter during the first episode of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.
Lloyd Bishop NBC

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 5:26 pm

Read more
The Salt
3:09 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Simple Summer Jam Session Calls For Strawberries And Sunshine

A few jars of strawberry jam bask in the light of what made them: the summer sun.
Christian Grantham Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 7:55 pm

With the onset of summer comes also a bounty of strawberries. Add to those berries a bit of sugar and plenty of sunlight, and you have a strawberry jam recipe fit for the season's best mornings — with a slice of good toast, of course.

Read more
Code Switch
2:33 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

David Tomas Martinez Turns Hustle In The Street To Poetry On The Page

David Tomas Martinez was born and raised in San Diego.
Courtesy of David Tomas Martinez

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 5:26 pm

Before writing the poems that make up Hustle, David Tomas Martinez was hustling for a long time. In sidelong verses, he compacts his childhood in the Meadowbrook Houses in San Diego, his teenage years running with a gang, his enlistment in the Navy, and then his eventual escape into the world of poetry — a place he admits sometimes surprises even him.

Read more
Movie Reviews
1:14 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

In Charming Film 'Begin Again,' Music Can Save A Life

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Director John Carney had a surprise hit with his low-budget musical "Once." And he returns to the musical arena - this time in New York and not Dublin - with his new movie "Begin Again." Keira Knightley plays a heartbroken singer-songwriter who teams up with a down and out drunken producer played by Mark Ruffalo. Film critic David Edelstein has this review.

Read more
Movie Interviews
1:14 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

'Life Itself': An Unflinching Documentary Of Roger Ebert's Life And Death

Roger and Chaz Ebert attended a benefit awards dinner in Chicago in October 2011. Just over a year later, Ebert agreed to be filmed for a documentary. And then his cancer returned.
Daniel Boczarski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 3:05 pm

Roger Ebert was often considered the most famous film critic of his generation. Now filmmaker Steve James has produced a documentary about his life and death, called Life Itself.

In 2002, Ebert was diagnosed with cancer. Four years later, he had surgery to remove part of his lower jaw. It left him unable to eat, drink or speak. For the rest of his life, he was fed through a tube.

But his popularity seemed to only increase as he blogged and tweeted about films. Ebert loved movies and went out of his way to champion filmmakers he believed in — including James.

Read more
Code Switch
12:03 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

The Late Walter Dean Myers Wrote In The Language Of Teens

Author Walter Dean Myers tours his old Harlem neighborhood in New York, Dec. 13, 2010.
Charles Sykes AP

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 2:01 pm

Writer Walter Dean Myers died on Wednesday after a brief illness at age 76, leaving mourners in the adult world and young readers who saw themselves in his books. He expanded the face of publishing so that many children of color saw themselves reflected in his work.

Read more
The Salt
10:48 am
Thu July 3, 2014

No Ants Were Harmed At These Picnics Of The Past

Two couples having a picnic during the '50s.
George Marks Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 1:58 pm

When summertime rolls around, we're all for eating outdoors, but the American heyday of the picnic may very well have been the 1950s.

Convenience food was newly popular; many mothers stayed home and had time to pack everything just right. Tupperware was taking off, picnic tables popped up on roadsides, and an outing in the fresh country air was often just what the doctor ordered.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:49 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Book News: Children's Author Walter Dean Myers Dies At 76

Author Walter Dean Myers tours his old Harlem neighborhood in New York in 2010.
Charles Sykes AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
Newscast
6:34 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Space community mourns a loss, Aviation gets a boost at Auburn

6am Newscast

Thursday July 3, 2014

Read more

Pages