Arts & Life

Bishop Pleads Guilty
5:54 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Ex UAH Prof. Pleads Guilty To Killing Ala. Colleagues

Former UAH professor Amy Bishop pleaded guilty to killing three colleagues and shooting three others.
Wikimedia Commons

A former biology professor accused of pulling a gun from her purse and opening fire at a faculty meeting pleaded guilty Tuesday to killing three colleagues and wounding three others at the University of Alabama in Huntsville in 2010.

Amy Bishop, 47, pleaded guilty to one count of capital murder involving two or more people and three counts of attempted murder during a hearing in Huntsville. She had earlier pleaded not guilty, and her lawyers said she planned to use an insanity defense.

Read more
Arts & Life
4:28 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Pulitzer Winner Lecturing at Alabama for 2 Days

Biologist E.O. Wilson
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._O._Wilson Wikipedia

A renowned biologist and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner is lecturing the next two days at the University of Alabama.


Alabama graduate and Mobile native E.O. Wilson will be serving as a scholar-in-residence at the university in Tuscaloosa.


Wilson is best known for his study of small life forms including ants. He will speak on "The Social Conquest of Earth" on Tuesday night, and then address students during a convocation on Wednesday.


On Monday, Wilson was the keynote speaker at an awards luncheon for the Alabama Humanities Foundation.

Remembering 9/11
3:57 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Alabamians Pause To Remember Victims Of 9/11

People all around Alabama are remembering victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks 11 years after they occurred.
The National Guard Flickr

Flags are flying at half-staff at Alabama's Capitol, and people are pausing statewide to remember victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks 11 years after they occurred.

Birmingham fire stations displayed their fire engines with the lights on Tuesday to mark the anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001. Police in Decatur took time to salute people killed in the attacks.

Read more
Opinion
9:52 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Vietnam To Sept. 11: A Daughter's Lessons

Members of West Point's class of 1965 are honored with a parade by cadets at the class's 40th reunion at the military academy in New York in 2005.
Laurel Dalrymple NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 6:37 am

Laurel Dalrymple is an editor at NPR.org.

Duty — Honor — Country. Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be. They are your rallying points: to build courage when courage seems to fail; to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith; to create hope when hope becomes forlorn. – Gen. Douglas MacArthur, May 1962

Read more
The Record
9:45 am
Tue September 11, 2012

My American Dream Sounds Like The Jackson 5

The six brothers who would all get their turn in The Jackson 5.
Frank Barratt Courtesy of Getty Images

Read more
U.S.
8:57 am
Tue September 11, 2012

In New York City, A Somber Remembrance Of Sept. 11

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF BAGPIPES)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Those are the sounds of Ground Zero in New York where a memorial service is underway this morning, marking the anniversary - the 11th anniversary - of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Moments of silence and commemorations have been held in New York, at the Pentagon and at a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania to honor the nearly 3,000 victims of the attack.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Strange News
4:21 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Marathon Runner Shatters World Record, Or Not

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:57 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When a runner, originally from Sudan, ran the Sioux Falls Marathon and shattered the world record by 25 minutes, he was as shocked as everyone else. Maybe I'm lost. I don't know, Olok Nykew told a reporter at the finish. Turns out, he was correct. According to the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, he had arrived late to the race. He ran the wrong route - the half marathon. I'm not cheating. I was just confused, he said. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Science
2:31 am
Tue September 11, 2012

A Berry So Shiny, It's Irresistible (And Inedible)

The shiny blue berries of the tropical Pollia condensata plant rely on their looks, not nutritional content, to attract birds to spread their seeds.
Silvia Vignolini et al. via PNAS

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:57 am

That fake fruit in the wooden bowls that hotels love to decorate their lobbies with never looks quite right. No, apparently it takes nature to make a fake that looks even better than the real thing.

Read more
Religion
2:26 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Episcopal Church Woos Latinos To Congregations

The Rev. Roberto Arciniega, head of Latino ministries for the Episcopal Diocese of Oregon, says the denomination must reach out to Latinos to stay relevant in a multicultural society.
Chris Lehman for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:57 am

Latinos are the fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States, but only 5 percent of all Hispanics attend a mainline Protestant church. The vast majority are Roman Catholic.

For the Episcopal Church, those numbers are an opportunity.

The denomination is seeing fast-growing pockets of new Latino congregants. Episcopal churches in Nevada and Washington, D.C., are seeing considerably higher attendance from Latinos. In Oregon, there were only 150 Latino Episcopalians 20 years ago. Now, there are more than 800.

Read more
Siegelman To Prison
5:36 pm
Mon September 10, 2012

Siegelman On Way To La. To Complete Prison Term

Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman reports to prison in La. to complete prison term.
Dave Martin Associated Press

Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman said he was in "good spirits" as he prepared to enter prison to complete a 78-month sentence for his federal government corruption conviction.

Siegelman has been ordered to report to federal prison in Oakdale, La., by 2 p.m. Tuesday. The man who has served in four of Alabama's top elected offices, said he is optimistic he will eventually be pardoned by President Obama.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:29 pm
Mon September 10, 2012

What Will Apple's Patent Case Mean For Phone Design?

These Nokia phones unveiled earlier this month are the first smartphones built for Windows 8.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 5:52 pm

A lot of thought goes into giving your smartphone a distinctive look and feel, from the shape of the speaker — square, round or oval — to where to put the buttons — side, front or back.

But industrial designers like Robert Brunner say he doesn't have a lot of room to be creative.

"Because you're really being so heavily driven on maintaining a minimal physical size," he says. "So you really get into this very fine envelope of a few millimeters that you have to work with."

Read more
Author Interviews
11:16 am
Mon September 10, 2012

'Good Girls Revolt': Story Of A Newsroom Uprising

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 7:42 am

In the 1960s, Lynn Povich worked at Newsweek — where she became part of a revolution.

"At Newsweek, women were hired on the mail desk to deliver mail, then to clip newspapers, and, if they were lucky, became researchers or fact checkers," Povich tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer, whom she knows personally. "All of the writers and reporters were men, and everyone accepted it as that was the way the world was — until we didn't."

Read more
Fine Art
11:13 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Are All Young Artists 'Post-9/11' Artists?

Knitting Is for Pus**** is a work by crochet sculptor Olek. He has created an entire apartment blanketed in brightly colored, crocheted camouflage.
Olek Courtesy Jonathan LeVine Gallery, New York, N.Y.

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 2:52 am

When museum curator Nicholas Bell was putting together the show Craft Futures: 40 Under 40 at the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick Gallery, he realized the artists had something in common besides their under-40 status. Because of their youth, he felt that each of them could be classified as "post 9/11" artists.

"Their worldview is defined by the angst, the unease, the trepidation of the difficulties of the 21st century," he says.

Read more
Music Al Fresco
11:07 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Classical Guitar In The California Breeze

"My first memories are listening to music and feeling my body tingle," says Philip Rosheger, a classical guitarist who performs outdoors in Berkeley, Calif.
Thom Brekke

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 12:43 pm

Weekend Edition's series on the sounds of street music winds down with a classical guitarist: Philip Rosheger, who performs on the corner of Vine and Walnut in Berkeley, Calif. Rosheger says he was keen on music from an extremely young age — which didn't sit well with his father, a bandleader in the U.S. Air Force.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:06 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Surfing Goes To The Dogs In Del Mar, Calif.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Delmar is one of the most popular surfing spots here in southern California. And yesterday it went to the dogs with the Seventh Annual Dog Surfing competition. Hundreds of canines and their owners paddled out. And then the dogs rode the surfboards back to shore. The North County Times reports the event may have set a record with 14 dogs riding the same wave. And it may have, since there are no dog surfing records. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

Pages