Arts & Life

Toomer's Oaks
6:40 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Auburn Council Sets Date for Toomer's Oaks Removal

The removal of the Toomer's Oaks at Auburn University has been set for April 23.
apr.org

The Auburn City Council has set April 23 as the date when the iconic Toomer's Oaks at Auburn University will be removed.


The Opelika-Auburn News reports removal of the trees will require closing city streets in the area.


City Manager Charlie Duggan said the removal has tentatively been set for 7 a.m. to noon on April 23, but the time is subject to change depending on weather and how long the removal takes.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Mojo, Music And Semi-Divine Sibling Rivalry In 'Sister Mine'

It's like this: Makeda is trying to make a clean break from her old life by getting a super's gig in a bohemian Toronto warehouse of artsy up-and-comers. And it won't be easy — she's still riddled with guilt and uncertainty, after having struggled for years to care for her bedridden father and to get out from under the shadow of her twin sister, Abby, who's kind of a diva and has a lot of pull in the family.

The family of gods, that is.

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First Reads
6:03 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'The Burgess Boys,' By Elizabeth Strout

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 7:16 am

  • Listen to the Excerpt

Elizabeth Strout's newest book begins with crime. Zach, the youngest member of the Burgess family, throws a severed pig's head through the front door of a mosque in his quiet, rural Maine town. The mosque is run by a recently arrived community of Somali immigrants, who have already faced some hostility from the town. Everyone is shocked, but no one more so than Zach himself.

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Poetry
2:06 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Revisiting Iraq Through The Eyes Of An Exiled Poet

Dunya Mikhail is an Iraqi-American poet who teaches in Michigan. She has published five books in Arabic and two in English.
Michael Smith Courtesy of Dunya Mikhail

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:45 am

Poet Dunya Mikhail fled her homeland, Iraq, a few years after the first Gulf War. She had been questioned by Saddam Hussein's government, and state media had labeled her writing and poetry subversive. Mikhail escaped to Jordan and eventually reached the United States, where she made a home for herself — marrying, raising a daughter and becoming a U.S. citizen.

Mikhail never physically returned to Iraq. But she revisits her homeland again and again in her poetry — line by line, stanza by stanza.

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Sketches From A War-Torn World: A British Illustrator In Syria

Ahmed, 10, was rocketed on Feb. 13., and lost his leg. There doesn't seem anything more mundane than drawing when you are standing next to a child that has lost his mother, his brother and his leg within the last 48 hours His father, Yassar's face, raked with worry sits in a clinic at Bab al Hawa. He keeps pulling his adult sized oxygen mask off his little face.
Courtesy of George Butler

George Butler lives between two worlds. One is his apartment in London, and the other consists of conflict-ravaged places like West Africa, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan and Syria.

The British illustrator recently returned from his second trip to Syria, and his reportage illustrations are a powerful account of life in the country's north, where the fighting is heavy and rebels now control many areas.

The illustrations are not just about the sorrows and pain of Syrian refugees and the wounded, but often about Syrians' stubborn insistence that life will carry on despite the pain.

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Arts & Life
3:10 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Alabama Athletics Director Mal Moore steps down

University of Alabama Athletics Director Mal Moore
University of Alabama

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Author Interviews
12:06 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

'Sex And The Citadel' Peeks Inside Private Lives In The Arab World

Shereen El Feki is the author of Sex and the Citadel.
Kristof Arasim Pantheon

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:49 pm

"I know of young women who have been returned to their families by their husbands because, as you say, they did not bleed on defloweration," Shereen El Feki tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

El Feki, the author of the new book Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World, spent five years traveling across the Arab region asking people about sex: what they do, what they don't, what they think and why.

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World
11:26 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Imperfect Gentlemen Says Being Persian Is Hip

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:33 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You can find our next guest on most Monday nights at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles, where he is part of Comedy Bazaar and he offers his signature riffs on his particularly interesting cross-cultural dilemmas.

TEHRAN VON GHASRI: My name is Tehran. It's like the capital city of Iran. You're, like, wondering, what were my parents thinking, naming me Tehran, right? But I'm half black, half Iranian, which comes with a lot of advantages. I have a lot of fun at the airport. It's true. Homeland Security knows me on a first name basis.

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Monkey See
10:48 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Men Are From Mars, Women ... Love Cup Holders?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 11:37 am

When you read the words of Clotaire Rapaille, a "French-born psychiatrist-turned-marketer" quoted in yesterday's interesting Slate article about the marketing of cars to women, it's hard not to read them in a voice that's sultry and French and not entirely serious, as if he's some kind of sales expert crossed with Pepe Le Pew (despite the fact that this doubtless has no basis in reality).

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Kitchen Window
8:27 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Lard And Schmaltz Make A Comeback In The Kitchen

This version of Matzo Ball Soup is made with rendered chicken fat, or schmaltz.
Peter Ogburn for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 12:53 pm

I grew up in the South, where every home cook I admired kept a can of bacon grease in the refrigerator. That grease was used to launch many fine dishes. One friend's mother made biscuits with butter and bacon fat. Needless to say, I was a husky child.

Now, after years in culinary exile, lard is staging a comeback.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Book News: Jane Goodall Apologizes For Lifted Passages In Her New Book

Primatologist Jane Goodall observes chimpanzees in 1997 at the Sweetwaters Chimpanzee Sanctuary near Nanyuki, north of Nairobi, Kenya.
Jean-Marc Bouju AP

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 12:56 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Tigers, Scholars And Smugglers, All 'At Home' In Sprawling Novel

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 12:04 pm

It's difficult to predict the reception Where Tigers Are at Home will receive in the United States. The winner of France's Prix Medicis in 2008, this big, sprawling novel (in a translation by Mike Mitchell) comes to us from Algerian-born writer, philosopher and world traveler Jean-Marie Blas de Robles, author of more than a dozen works of fiction, poetry and nonfiction. This book — the first of his to appear in the U.S. in English — stands as a challenge to readers who want their fiction to offer a quick pay-off.

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Arts & Life
9:03 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

What's The Score On Spirited Sports Banter At Bars?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 8:30 am

The more I travel, the more I see sports bars. They've been around for years, usually in obvious places, like in college towns or near arenas.

But now they're everywhere, even in airports and hotels, places where you'd expect generic bars. Sports bars are becoming ubiquitous and ordinary — merely, as my wife calls them, public man caves.

All bars, of course, have forever been places where men talk about sports. Other prime saloon subjects include women, the traffic and the weather.

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Arts & Life
5:27 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

NFL Owners Pass Two New, Safety Related Rules

Trainers work on Houston Texans linebacker Brian Cushing during the first half of an NFL football game against the New York Jets in 2012.
Kathy Willens AP

NFL owners passed two rules aimed at improving player safety, today.

The Associated Press reports:

"The owners outlawed peel-back blocks anywhere on the field; previously, they were illegal only inside the tackle box. A player makes a peel-back block when he is moving toward his goal line, approaches an opponent from behind or the side and makes contact below the waist.

"The penalty will be 15 yards.

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Casino Raid
4:38 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Judge Won't Step Aside From Alabama Casino Case

Attorney General Luther strange asked Judge Tom Young Jr. to step aside from deciding what to do about gambling machines and cash seized from VictoryLand casino.
Credit LutherStrange.com

A Macon County judge has refused to step aside from deciding what to do about gambling machines and cash seized from VictoryLand casino in Shorter.


State Attorney General Luther Strange had asked Circuit Judge Tom Young Jr. to recuse himself on grounds that he is prejudiced against the state's evidence. Young ruled at a hearing Tuesday that he is not prejudiced and will remain on the case rather than sending it to another judge. A spokesman for the attorney general says he is evaluating the next move.

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