Arts & Life

TED Radio Hour
8:31 am
Fri January 23, 2015

What's Your Coming Out Story?

Ash Beckham speaking at TEDxBoulder about how we all have our own closets.
Courtesy of Kit Chalberg TEDxBoulder

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 11:35 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Keeping Secrets

About Ash Beckham's TED Talk

Equality advocate Ash Beckham offers a fresh story about empathy and openness — and it involves pancakes.

About Ash Beckham

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TED Radio Hour
8:31 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Why Would You Share A Secret With A Stranger?

Since November 2004, PostSecret founder Frank Warren has received more than 500,000 postcards with secrets written on them.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 11:34 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Keeping Secrets

About Frank Warren's TED Talk

"Secrets ... can be shocking, or silly, or soulful," says Frank Warren, the founder of PostSecret. He shares a few of the half-million secrets that strangers have sent him on postcards.

About Frank Warren

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Movie Interviews
4:13 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

'Red Army' Explores How The Cold War Played Out On Ice

The documentary Red Army profiles Viacheslav "Slava" Fetisov — one of the most decorated athletes in Soviet history.
Slava Fetisov Slava Fetisov/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 9:14 am

When the U.S. Olympic hockey team upset the Soviet Union in 1980's "Miracle on Ice," President Jimmy Carter called coach Herb Brooks to congratulate him on the win.

"Tell the whole team that we're extremely proud of them," Carter said. "I think it just proves that our way of life is the proper way to continue on."

The other way of life, the Soviet way — which produced some of the best hockey players in the world — only went on for another decade or so.

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Found Recipes
4:13 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Hostess Isn't The Mostest: Make Your Own Sno Balls At Home

Jennifer Steinhauer's version of the Sno Ball moves the marshmallow inside and skips the pink food coloring.
James Ransom Courtesy of Clarkson Potter, a division of Random House LLC

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 5:28 pm

When Hostess Brands announced it was filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2012, there was a lot of anguish on the Internet about the death of Twinkies, Ding Dongs, Donettes and the like.

And it got Jennifer Steinhauer, a New York Times reporter and food writer, wondering why anyone would even want a Twinkie in adulthood?

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Monkey See
4:00 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Some Glittery Favorites From The Miss Universe National Costume Show

Chanel Beckenlehner, Miss Canada 2014. This is the one that's been getting all the press. Drink it in, people. The scoreboard is attached.
Patrick Prather Miss Universe Organization

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 8:40 pm

One of my favorite bonkers displays of the year is the National Costume Show at the Miss Universe pageant. I don't watch the pageant, I don't care who wins, I don't think any of the countries are funny, I don't think any of the cultural references in the outfits are funny, but the costumes are hysterical, and this is basically the joyful, glittering, headpiece-wearing Olympics Of Gaudy Excess, and I could not be more on board. The captions have all the info you could ever need and then some.

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Sports
12:20 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Broadcaster Al Michaels Gets Ready To Provide 'Lyrics' For The Super Bowl

Al Michaels will announce the Super Bowl game between the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots on Feb. 1.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 2:28 pm

When the Seattle Seahawks and New England Patriots meet in the 2015 Super Bowl on Feb. 1, the broadcast booth will be anchored by a man who has done the play-by-play for eight previous Super Bowls. Al Michaels, the announcer for NBC's Sunday Night Football, knows how to put emotion into his broadcasts.

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Book Reviews
11:03 am
Thu January 22, 2015

Delicious Short Stories, Ripe On The Vine In 'Honeydew'

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 1:06 pm

Prize-winning short story writer Edith Pearlman has just come out with a new collection of short fiction, called Honeydew. And the first thing I wanted to do after finishing my initial reading of these 20 stories was, well, I wanted to go right back again and start from the beginning.

But instead, I've put my own rereading on pause so I can tug at your sleeve about this marvelous talent who moves among us. Here is one of our best living short story writers, and with Honeydew, her fifth volume, her reputation is gaining serious velocity.

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Ask Me Another
10:13 am
Thu January 22, 2015

John Darnielle: Master Of Reality

"[Death metal] is a very passionate music. It's also really dark and gory--and I like that stuff." - John Darnielle, of the Mountain Goats.
DL Andersoni

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 11:06 am

John Darnielle is the core, and sometimes only, member of the band the Mountain Goats. Thought by many to be "America's best non-hip-hop lyricist," he crafts songs that read like stories, and sound like they were recorded in his basement on a rickety tape deck.

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Ask Me Another
10:11 am
Thu January 22, 2015

Buffer The Consequences

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 10:51 am

It's going down at Ask Me Another! Don't crumble or stumble under the pressure, because in this game contestants have to think of words that end in "-umble." So let's get ready to...

Heard in 'Til Death Metal Do Us Part

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Ask Me Another
10:11 am
Thu January 22, 2015

The Hills Are Alive

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 10:51 am

Every correct answer contains the letters H-I-L-L. What phrase metaphorically refers to a fatal weak spot? If you slay this round, then perhaps you don't have one of these when it comes to trivia.

Heard in 'Til Death Metal Do Us Part

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Ask Me Another
10:11 am
Thu January 22, 2015

The Actor Factor

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 10:51 am

Stars sell movies. Be honest: would you rather watch Snakes on a Plane or "Snakes on a John Wayne"? In this game, contestants replace words in movie titles with rhyming celebrity names.

Heard in 'Til Death Metal Do Us Part

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Ask Me Another
10:11 am
Thu January 22, 2015

State Of Mind

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 10:51 am

Get on that midnight train to...North Korea?? Guess what US state actually completes these lyrics as Jonathan Coulton sings famous songs with the wrong geographic regions in their titles.

Heard in 'Til Death Metal Do Us Part

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Ask Me Another
10:11 am
Thu January 22, 2015

Sports, Explicated

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 10:51 am

Grab your oversized porous foam digit, because in this game, contestants must decipher the names of college sports teams from an overly literal explanation. Go athlete! Do the sport!

Heard in 'Til Death Metal Do Us Part

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Thu January 22, 2015

The Vastness Of Violent Loss In 'See How Small'

Author Scott Blackwood based See How Small on a real incident, a multiple murder at an Austin, Texas, frozen yogurt shop in 1991.
Brian Cox

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 12:57 pm

On a chilly autumn night in Austin, Texas, three teenage girls are finishing up their shift at an ice cream shop. Two men walk in, and when they leave, the store is on fire, the three girls still in there, naked, bound with their own underwear, murdered. The slayings and the arson take just minutes, but the families and friends of the girls take years to get over it — or to try to get over it; of course, they never do.

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Parallels
1:16 pm
Wed January 21, 2015

Bulgakov's 'Master' Still Strikes A Chord In Today's Russia

Written during the Soviet era, Mikhail Bulgakov's classic novel, The Master and Margarita, continues to resonate in today's Russia.
Sovfoto UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 6:00 pm

In times of turmoil, Russians turn to their great writers for inspiration.

One of those writers is Mikhail Bulgakov, who died 75 years ago. Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin liked some of Bulgakov's work, but he considered most of it too dangerous to publish. A museum in Moscow shows that the work is just as relevant as ever.

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