Anniston Army Depot

Jay Reeves / Associated Press

The Pentagon spent $10.2 billion over three decades burning chemical weapons stored in four states. Now, with those chemicals up in smoke and communities freed of a threat, the Army's in the middle of another, $1.3 billion project: Demolishing the incinerators that destroyed the toxic materials.

In Alabama, Oregon, Utah and Arkansas, crews are tearing apart multibillion-dollar incinerators or working to draw the curtain on a drama that began in the Cold War, when the United States and the former Soviet Union stockpiled millions of pounds of chemical weapons.

A defense contractor has notified 139 of its roughly 400 employees at its Anniston Army Depot site that they will be laid off in March and April.

The Anniston Star reports ( ) that General Dynamics Land Systems will employ fewer workers after April due to declining military orders for combat vehicles. The company builds and repairs combat vehicles.

Peter Keating, spokesman for General Dynamics Land Systems, said the layoffs were necessary due to a lack of work at the facility.