Alabama Lethal Injection

A federal judge has halted the execution of an Alabama inmate just hours before he was to be put to death.Chief U.S. District Judge Keith Watkins on Thursday stayed the execution of 56-year-old Jeffery Lynn  Borden. 

The reprieve came about four hours before Borden was set to be given a lethal injection at a southwest Alabama prison.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled Alabama can proceed with the execution of a man convicted of killing his estranged wife and father-in-law in 1993.   

 A divided court on Wednesday overturned a stay issued by the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Jeffery Lynn Borden is scheduled to receive a lethal injection Thursday at a south Alabama prison.

Two Alabama death row inmates are asking the state Supreme Court to halt their executions scheduled for next month.  

 Lawyers on Wednesday asked the Alabama Supreme Court to stop the executions since the 11th Circuit Court ordered hearings in a separate lawsuit challenging the humaneness of the state's lethal injection procedure.

A federal appeals court has revived a lawsuit filed by four Alabama death-row inmates challenging the state's use of a controversial sedative at the start of lethal injections.  

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday ruled that a federal judge prematurely dismissed the inmates' claims. The judges ordered the lower court to hold an evidentiary hearing on whether midazolam will effectively render inmates unconscious during executions.

The U.S. Supreme Court has issued a temporary stay on the execution of an Alabama prison inmate.

The nation's high court stayed the execution of Tommy Arthur, "pending further order" from the justices, late Thursday afternoon. Arthur was scheduled to be executed Thursday evening.

 

A federal judge says the state of Alabama may not use a large dose of a sedative to execute five death row inmates.

U.S. District Judge William Keith Watkins issued an order Thursday denying the state's requests to dismiss lawsuits from five inmates who have challenged Alabama three-drug lethal injection procedure. The inmates were asked to present alternative means of execution and among other things suggested single doses of midazolam in amended complaints.

Lawyers for a death row inmate say Alabama should be forced to disclose more information about lethal injection procedures. A-P-R’s Stan Ingold reports, they’re concerned about the drugs used in the procedure.

Attorneys for inmate Tommy Arthur in a court filing say the state needs to disclose information including how the drugs are delivered, how inmate consciousness is monitored and the expiration dates of drugs in hand.

The Alabama House Health Committee recently approved a series of abortion restrictions that opponents say would ban most abortions in the state.

The committee approved three separate pieces of legislation, including one bill that would prohibit abortion providers from performing an abortion if a fetal heartbeat is detected.

Bill sponsor Terri Collins says the end of a person's life is defined by the absence of a heartbeat, so it makes sense that the beginning of life should be defined by the presence of one.

The execution of an Alabama death row inmate has been put on hold.

U.S. District Judge William Keith Watkins granted the emergency stay to Tommy Arthur. The convicted killer is challenging the state’s new execution drug combination on the grounds that it’s cruel and unusual punishment. The cocktail uses the same chemicals used in botched executions in other states.

Project Hope executive director Esther Brown says this form of capital punishment is not that different from policies of the past.

A federal judge in Alabama has ruled on three gay couples' request that she force a probate judge to issue marriage licenses in Mobile County.

U.S. District Judge Callie Granade has ordered Mobile County Probate Judge Don Davis to begin issuing Same-Sex Marriage Licenses.

Granade held the hearing amid confusion across the state, as many probate judges refused to issue the licenses after state Chief Justice Roy Moore said they didn't have to.

The Montgomery Advertiser

    

The first female president of the University of Alabama is stepping down.

The university released a statement from President Judy Bonner on Wednesday saying she will leave office no later than September 30, 2015.

Bonner says she wants to return to the classroom. She plans to take a yearlong sabbatical and resume teaching in fall 2016.

Bonner says she's announcing her departure early to allow time for trustees to begin a search for her replacement next month.