Alabama Department of Archives and History

PBS.org

Today is Confederate Memorial Day. Many across the South will recognize Confederate soldiers who fell during the Civil War. It’s one of three of these uniquely Southern holidays.  There is some controversy that surrounds these days of observance in Alabama and elsewhere in the South.

 

Confederate Memorial Day and the birthdays of Robert E. Lee Day and Jefferson Davis make up the trio of holidays related to the Civil War.

 

Steve Murray is the director of the Alabama Archives and History. He says Confederate Memorial Day has a long history…   

“Alabama: The Making of an American State”

Author: Edwin C. Bridges  

Publisher: The University of Alabama Press

Pages: 241 pp.

Price: $39.95 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper)

For thirty years as the Director of the Alabama Department of Archives and History, Ed Bridges was immersed in Alabama history. Now Director Emeritus, Bridges has finished his magnum opus, a narrative history of the state from 11,000 B.C. to the very present, in time for the Alabama Bicentennial in 2019.

Alabama Department of Archives and History

The University of Alabama is renovating a building that helped to modernize the treatment of mental illness in the U.S. following the Civil War. Old Bryce Hospital sits on the Tuscaloosa campus. It was the first asylum to unshackle its patients and ban the use of straitjackets. There’s another innovation that’s less known. Old Bryce Hospital used to print its own newspapers and historians believe many of the stories were written by the patients. APR’s Stan Ingold brings us the story of the Meteor…

archives.alabama.gov

The Alabama Department of Archives and History is opening a major new exhibit in Montgomery. A ribbon cutting is being held Saturday on the lawn of the Archives building for a new centerpiece exhibition called "Alabama Voices." Gov. Robert Bentley and first lady Dianne Bentley will attend. The department says the exhibit is the result of a decade of research, planning and fundraising. It covers the sweep of Alabama history from the early 1700s until today. The exhibition includes more than 800 artifacts and hundreds of images.

en.wikipedia.org

A new exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History will use voices to tell the story of Alabama from 1700 to the end of the 21st Century.

   Archives officials say the new exhibit - scheduled to open by the end of the year - will include language taken from diaries, letters, speeches, songs and other sources to represent Alabamians from every walk of life.

   The new exhibit will be located on the second floor of the archives building in downtown Montgomery.