Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion

President Barack Obama will be in Birmingham this afternoon to talk about the economy.

The President will be speaking at Lawson State Community College on consumer protection issues and the contrast between his vision for the American middle class and Republican efforts to undermine that vision.

According to a White House press release, Congressional Republicans are continuing to roll back progress toward a safer financial system and stronger economy, encouraging the types of abuses that led to the 2008 financial crisis.

The current state legislation session is underway and one topic that seems to be getting a cold reception is Medicaid expansion. Governor Robert Bentley caused political shockwaves when he said he was at least open to the idea.

That guarded endorsement isn’t winning a lot of support in the state House and Senate.

But a proposal to insure more than 250-thousand Alabamians is not getting anywhere.

“We must take real steps to reverse the trouble health trends that have occurred in our state.”

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The Moral Mondays movement has spread from North Carolina to Alabama.

Founder William Barber urged a crowd on the state Capitol steps Monday to push Alabama's Republican-controlled Legislature to adopt a moral agenda. He said that would include expanding Medicaid, repealing a law to require voters to show a photo ID at the polls, and making sure all citizens have access to justice.

Barber said the tea party has hijacked the Republican Party in Alabama and some of the current leadership should be called "extremists."

A new report details who exactly would benefit from expanded Medicaid in Alabama.  The advocacy group Alabama Arise and the national Families USA are highlighting the professions of the people who are being caught in the so-called “Medicaid Gap.”  Those are people who make too little to qualify for subsidies under the healthcare law but too much to qualify for Medicaid.  Authors of the Affordable Care Act had planned for states to expand Medicaid but many Republican-leanin


State officials say Alabama Medicaid's monthly enrollment has topped 1 million for the first time.

Officials said Thursday that a review of data for the first five months of the year show the milestone happened in February. Officials attribute the increase to a federally required transfer of children from the state's All Kids program and changes in how Medicaid eligibility is determined. Officials say the numbers also reflect the first enrollment of individuals who applied for coverage through the federal health exchange under the federal Affordable Care Act.


All year long, Alabama Public Radio is collaborating with A-L-dot-com on the Affordable Care Act. The federal deadline to sign-up for health insurance is now well in the rear view mirror and you find yourself without health care. You don’t receive insurance from your employer. You don’t qualify for Medicaid, and you didn’t sign up in the federal marketplace during the open-enrollment. The Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate says that Americans have to obtain health insurance or pay a penalty.

All year long on Alabama Public Radio, we’re collaborating with to examine the Affordable Care Act.  When it comes to healthcare, Alabama has its problems. So does the commonwealth of Kentucky.  The difference is, the Bluegrass state is going about it differently and they seem to be getting results.

The deadline to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is Monday.  All this week, and for the rest of the year, Alabama Public Radio is partnering with AL.Com to bring you stories on how Alabamians are coping with the changes.  One issue that’s having an immediate impact is the so-called Medicaid gap.  The authors of the Affordable Care Act had intended for low-income people to get covered under expanded Medicaid.  But when the U.S.

U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that 624 Alabamians selected health insurance plans in the first month that Alabama's federally run health insurance marketplace was available.

That's equal to one-tenth of 1 percent of the estimated 677,000 Alabamians without health insurance.

The department says more than 10,500 applications were completed in Alabama in October, and they covered more than 20,800 people.

AP Photo/Dave Martin

Democrats in the Alabama Legislature failed to achieve their top goal for the 2013 session.

When the session began in February, Democratic legislators said their No. 1 goal was expanding Alabama's Medicaid program under the federal Affordable Care Act. But they conceded on the session's last day Monday that their goal had failed. A bill to expand the program drew opposition from Gov. Robert Bentley and never went anywhere.

The Democratic minority in the Alabama Senate has prepared legislation to require Alabama to expand its Medicaid program under the federal Affordable Care Act.

Democratic Sen. Hank Sanders of Selma said Tuesday the legislation is a life-or-death matter for some of the 300,000 people who would be covered by Alabama's Medicaid program.

AP Photo/Dave Martin

Democrats in the Alabama Senate are having trouble pressing their top issue.

Senate Minority Leader Vivian Davis Figures of Mobile offered a resolution Thursday urging the Republican governor to reconsider his decision not to expand Medicaid. The Senate's Republican leader, President Pro Tem Del Marsh, cut off debate on the resolution by getting it sent to the Senate Rules Committee.

Senate Democrats say their priority for the 2013 legislative session is getting Alabama to expand its Medicaid program.

The Senate Democratic Caucus announced at a news conference Tuesday that it hopes to get Republican Gov. Robert Bentley to reverse his decision not to expand the program under the federal Affordable Care Act. Bentley, a physician, is opposed to enlarging the Medicaid program under the current structure.

The Alabama NAACP is planning a rally Saturday at the Capitol in Montgomery to show its support for the Affordable Care Act.

Organizers say the rally is also to express concern about Gov. Robert Bentley not using the law to expand Medicaid coverage in Alabama.

A big deadline is looming today for state's like Alabama. Washington wants to know which states plan to create their own health insurance exchanges, as part of the Affordable Care Act. Each state that says “no” will leave that job up to the federal government. Today's deadline comes just days after the University of Alabama at Birmingham released a report related to the expansion of Medicaid under the act. The report says if Alabama opts into the Medicaid expansion, it could mean a billion dollars in new tax revenue for the state.