2014 elections


Election officials on Wednesday will count provisional ballots in a closely watched state senate race.

Longtime Sen. Roger Bedford of Russellville trails Republican Larry Stutts by just 60 votes, according to unofficial returns.

Voters can cast provisional ballots if they do not have the required photo identification or if they do not appear on a polling place's list of voters. The votes only count if election officials determine the person was rightfully eligible to vote.

Bedford's supporters say they will hold out hope until the last vote is counted.

Tuesday is Election Day across the nation.  Voters are heading to the polls to decide races that could

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  6am Newscast

Tuesday Novebmer 4, 2014

It is election day across the nation and here in Alabama, the polls are open from 7am to 7pm.  Information about the election and polling sites are at the website alabamavotes.gov.

The race between Gov. Robert Bentley and Democrat Parker Griffith has received most of the attention leading up to Election Day in Alabama.

  Ethics charges against House Speaker Mike Hubbard are becoming a campaign issue in the partisan battle for seats in the Alabama Legislature.

The Southern Progress Action Fund, an Arkansas group with deep Democratic Party ties, has begun airing ads featuring Hubbard's mug shot and urging voters to unseat incumbent Republicans.

Hubbard called the ads an attempt by an outside liberal group to influence Alabama elections.

The Alabama Legislature is almost certainly to remain majority Republican, but Democrats are seeking to regain some seats in swing districts.


Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he plans to use any leftover campaign funds to benefit the state.

Bentley said Friday he will set up a charitable organization to receive his leftover funds and then distribute them to projects. He said no projects are definite, but one group he would like to help is foster children.

Bentley did something similar with his inaugural fund in 2011. He raised $1.6 million in donations to pay for his inauguration and had more than $300,000 left. He donated that to the state General Fund to support state agencies during a lean budget year.


Alabama has the longest constitution in the United States. Next week, voters may make it a bit longer. One of the items on the upcoming ballot is called Amendment One. If passed, this would prevent Alabama courts from recognizing foreign law. State senator Gerald Allen is the chief sponsor of the measure. He says the amendment is there to protect the constitution…

Ryan Vasquez


Alabama's race for governor is heating up with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley releasing his first ad that focuses on his opponent.

Bentley's campaign posted an ad on social media Monday describing how Parker Griffith was elected to Congress as a Democrat, switched to the Republican Party and lost, and then switched back to the Democratic Party to run for governor.

The 30-second ad asks, "If Parker Griffith doesn't know who he is or what he stands for, how can we trust him to lead Alabama?"


A new national study says Alabama ranks 14th in the nation for money spent so far on television advertising during the 2014 elections.

The study by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity says candidates in Alabama had aired more than 30,000 TV ads through Oct. 6 that cost an estimated $10 million. That's about $2.80 per eligible voter.

The report says $2.6 million has been spent in the governor's race, with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley accounting for $2.1 million of that.

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Alabama's chief election official is reminding residents that the deadline to register to vote in the general election is Oct. 20.

Secretary of State Jim Bennett says residents can download a registration form from a state website alabamavotes.gov and mail it to their county board of registrars or they can go by their county board of registrars' office to register.


The state teachers' lobby has given Democratic candidate for governor Parker Griffith another financial boost.

The Alabama Education Association contributed $300,000 to Griffith's campaign on Friday. AEA also gave Griffith $300,000 in September.

The teachers' lobby is by far Griffith's largest cash contributor. Campaign finance reports show AEA's contributions make up $600,000 of the $647,000 in contributions raised by Griffith. The former congressman has also loaned his campaign $391,000.

Griffith and Republican Gov. Robert Bentley face off Nov. 4.


Democratic candidate for governor Parker Griffith says that if elected, he would open discussions with the Poarch Creek Indians about a gambling compact that would allow them to operate casinos with more types of games.

Griffith said Thursday in Huntsville that the tribe has done a great job in Alabama, and he'd talk with them about expanding their gambling operations in some areas to generate more tax revenue for the state.

The tribe has casinos in Atmore, Montgomery and Wetumpka, but they have only electronic games. They do not have table games.

Associated Press

The state teachers' organization, the Alabama Education Association, has become the biggest contributor to Democrat Parker Griffith's campaign for governor.

Griffith filed a campaign finance report late Thursday afternoon showing he had received a $300,000 contribution from AEA. Prior to the contribution, he was reporting $25,050 in his campaign account.

The contribution comes after AEA's political action committee reported borrowing $700,000 from a bank on Sept. 4.

Center for Public Integrity

A national report says Alabama ranks 11th among the states in spending on TV ads for the 2104 state campaigns.

The report by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity found that candidates for state level offices in Alabama had spent $6.9 million on TV ads that had aired through Sept. 8.

Nearly half of that came in legislative races. Many larger states didn't come close to that level of spending in legislative races. One of the study's authors says low TV ad rates in Alabama make the advertising available in lower-level races.


Alabama voters aren't likely to see debates between Alabama's two candidates for governor.

Representatives of Republican incumbent Robert Bentley and Democratic challenger Parker Griffith had been talking about scheduling debates, but those talks failed.

Bentley says he welcomed a spirited exchange, but Griffith was only interested in negative campaigning and name-calling.

Griffith says Bentley is unmanly and arrogant for not being willing to debate his policies.