2014 elections


Election officials on Wednesday will count provisional ballots in a closely watched state senate race.

Longtime Sen. Roger Bedford of Russellville trails Republican Larry Stutts by just 60 votes, according to unofficial returns.

Voters can cast provisional ballots if they do not have the required photo identification or if they do not appear on a polling place's list of voters. The votes only count if election officials determine the person was rightfully eligible to vote.

Bedford's supporters say they will hold out hope until the last vote is counted.

Tuesday is Election Day across the nation.  Voters are heading to the polls to decide races that could

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  6am Newscast

Tuesday Novebmer 4, 2014

It is election day across the nation and here in Alabama, the polls are open from 7am to 7pm.  Information about the election and polling sites are at the website alabamavotes.gov.

The race between Gov. Robert Bentley and Democrat Parker Griffith has received most of the attention leading up to Election Day in Alabama.

  Ethics charges against House Speaker Mike Hubbard are becoming a campaign issue in the partisan battle for seats in the Alabama Legislature.

The Southern Progress Action Fund, an Arkansas group with deep Democratic Party ties, has begun airing ads featuring Hubbard's mug shot and urging voters to unseat incumbent Republicans.

Hubbard called the ads an attempt by an outside liberal group to influence Alabama elections.

The Alabama Legislature is almost certainly to remain majority Republican, but Democrats are seeking to regain some seats in swing districts.


Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he plans to use any leftover campaign funds to benefit the state.

Bentley said Friday he will set up a charitable organization to receive his leftover funds and then distribute them to projects. He said no projects are definite, but one group he would like to help is foster children.

Bentley did something similar with his inaugural fund in 2011. He raised $1.6 million in donations to pay for his inauguration and had more than $300,000 left. He donated that to the state General Fund to support state agencies during a lean budget year.


Alabama has the longest constitution in the United States. Next week, voters may make it a bit longer. One of the items on the upcoming ballot is called Amendment One. If passed, this would prevent Alabama courts from recognizing foreign law. State senator Gerald Allen is the chief sponsor of the measure. He says the amendment is there to protect the constitution…

Ryan Vasquez


Alabama's race for governor is heating up with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley releasing his first ad that focuses on his opponent.

Bentley's campaign posted an ad on social media Monday describing how Parker Griffith was elected to Congress as a Democrat, switched to the Republican Party and lost, and then switched back to the Democratic Party to run for governor.

The 30-second ad asks, "If Parker Griffith doesn't know who he is or what he stands for, how can we trust him to lead Alabama?"


A new national study says Alabama ranks 14th in the nation for money spent so far on television advertising during the 2014 elections.

The study by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity says candidates in Alabama had aired more than 30,000 TV ads through Oct. 6 that cost an estimated $10 million. That's about $2.80 per eligible voter.

The report says $2.6 million has been spent in the governor's race, with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley accounting for $2.1 million of that.

Vox Efx / Flickr

Alabama's chief election official is reminding residents that the deadline to register to vote in the general election is Oct. 20.

Secretary of State Jim Bennett says residents can download a registration form from a state website alabamavotes.gov and mail it to their county board of registrars or they can go by their county board of registrars' office to register.


The state teachers' lobby has given Democratic candidate for governor Parker Griffith another financial boost.

The Alabama Education Association contributed $300,000 to Griffith's campaign on Friday. AEA also gave Griffith $300,000 in September.

The teachers' lobby is by far Griffith's largest cash contributor. Campaign finance reports show AEA's contributions make up $600,000 of the $647,000 in contributions raised by Griffith. The former congressman has also loaned his campaign $391,000.

Griffith and Republican Gov. Robert Bentley face off Nov. 4.


Democratic candidate for governor Parker Griffith says that if elected, he would open discussions with the Poarch Creek Indians about a gambling compact that would allow them to operate casinos with more types of games.

Griffith said Thursday in Huntsville that the tribe has done a great job in Alabama, and he'd talk with them about expanding their gambling operations in some areas to generate more tax revenue for the state.

The tribe has casinos in Atmore, Montgomery and Wetumpka, but they have only electronic games. They do not have table games.

Associated Press

The state teachers' organization, the Alabama Education Association, has become the biggest contributor to Democrat Parker Griffith's campaign for governor.

Griffith filed a campaign finance report late Thursday afternoon showing he had received a $300,000 contribution from AEA. Prior to the contribution, he was reporting $25,050 in his campaign account.

The contribution comes after AEA's political action committee reported borrowing $700,000 from a bank on Sept. 4.

Center for Public Integrity

A national report says Alabama ranks 11th among the states in spending on TV ads for the 2104 state campaigns.

The report by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity found that candidates for state level offices in Alabama had spent $6.9 million on TV ads that had aired through Sept. 8.

Nearly half of that came in legislative races. Many larger states didn't come close to that level of spending in legislative races. One of the study's authors says low TV ad rates in Alabama make the advertising available in lower-level races.


Alabama voters aren't likely to see debates between Alabama's two candidates for governor.

Representatives of Republican incumbent Robert Bentley and Democratic challenger Parker Griffith had been talking about scheduling debates, but those talks failed.

Bentley says he welcomed a spirited exchange, but Griffith was only interested in negative campaigning and name-calling.

Griffith says Bentley is unmanly and arrogant for not being willing to debate his policies.


Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley is maintaining a large fundraising lead over Democratic challenger Parker Griffith.

The Republican incumbent has raised more than $5 million in contributions in his quest to win a second term.

Campaign fundraising reports filed Wednesday show that Bentley added more than $400,000 to his campaign war chest in August.

Avery Vise / Twitter

The Democratic nominee in Alabama's 6th District congressional race is giving up his campaign.

Avery Vise said Thursday he's withdrawing from the race and has sent a letter to the Alabama Democratic Party informing leaders of his decision.

The party will now get to select someone to run against Republican nominee Gary Palmer in the general election in November.

Vise is new to politics and he says his small business is taking on new challenges that make it difficult to campaign.


A state legislator and the founder of a conservative policy group are meeting in the runoff for the Republican nomination in Alabama's 6th congressional district.

State Rep. Paul DeMarco and Gary Palmer are competing in Tuesday's runoff to replace the retiring Rep. Spencer Bachus.

The winner faces Democrat Avery Vise in November. The central Alabama district is considered one of the nation's strongest-leaning Republican areas.

Vox Efx / Flickr

Alabama voters go to the polls Tuesday for a runoff election that has more contested races on the Republican ballot than the Democratic ballot.

Alabama's attorney general has issued an advisory opinion saying a county commission does not have the authority to prohibit firearms at polling places.

The Chambers County Commission sought the advice of Attorney General Luther Strange after some people showed up to vote in the June 3 primary election in Chambers and Shelby counties carrying guns.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says he goes to work every day and thinks of a way to sue the Obama administration.

Al.com reports that Strange made the comment in a speech to the Republican Women of Huntsville. He told the group Tuesday that part of his oath of office compelled him in that pursuit. He described it as a full-time job that's the best job in Alabama politics. Strange has sued over the Affordable Care Act, opposed the Obama administration on environmental regulations and filed court briefs in several cases involving federal policy.


  The Republican runoff for state auditor on July 15 features two of Alabama's best known political mavericks who promise to transform the smallest office in the state Capitol into a center for uncovering wrongdoing.

Mobile attorney Jim Zeigler is known as "Mr. 49 Percent" for losing many close races. He takes on retired Shelby County businessman Dale Peterson, who became an Internet sensation in his 2010 race for agriculture commissioner where he toted a gun and promised to go after the crooks in Montgomery.


The third-place finisher in the Republican primary in the 6th Congressional District, state Sen. Scott Beason of Gardendale, has thrown his support to Gary Palmer in the runoff.

Beason says he and Palmer have known each other for many years through Beason's work in the Legislature and Palmer's leadership of the Alabama Policy Institute in Birmingham. Beason says Palmer knows the issues and is ready to serve.

Palmer ran second in the Republican primary June 3 to state Rep. Paul DeMarco of Homewood. They face off in the runoff July 15.

Voter turnout for Alabama's primary election Tuesday was much lower than four years ago.

Complete but unofficial returns from Tuesday's primary showed more than 613,000 people participated. That put the turnout at nearly 22 percent.

The turnout for the primary election four years ago was 32 percent, but both political parties had hot races for governor that year. The races for governor Tuesday were lopsided, with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley and Democrat Parker Griffith winning easily.


The Democratic nominee for governor, Parker Griffith, calls Republican incumbent Robert Bentley timid and irresponsible.

Griffith says he plans to focus his general election campaign on Bentley refusing to expand the state Medicaid program and not doing enough to increase jobs in the state.

Bentley said Wednesday he doesn't like negative campaigning, and he will focus his campaign on his records and his goals. He says politicians might not be very good candidates if they have to spend their time talking about how bad their opponents are.

Alabama Foundation for Limited Government

A group that ran TV ads critical of the Republican legislative leadership says it doesn't have to disclose its sources of funding because the ads were for educational purposes only.

An attorney for the Alabama Foundation for Limited Government, J. Brandon Rice, told Attorney General Luther Strange in a letter that the ads were not designed to influence Tuesday's primary election.

More than 700,000 Alabama voters are expected at the polls Tuesday for the first election where voters will be required to show a photo ID.

Alabama's chief election official, Jim Bennett, is predicting that 25 percent to 27 percent of Alabama's 2.8 million registered voters will turn out for the primary election. That's down from 32 percent four years ago, when both parties had hotly contested races for governor.

This is the first election where voters have to show a photo ID. That can include a driver's license, non-driver ID, Alabama voter ID or passport.

A decade-old old broadcasting contract at Auburn University is taking center stage in a new campaign ad.

Auburn University's former lobbyist appears in the television spot accusing Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard of getting confidential information to win the college's broadcasting contract more than a decade ago.

Lobbyist Buddy Mitchell says he gave Hubbard copies of the proposals to broadcast Auburn sporting events. Mitchell says that enabled Hubbard to undercut his competitors and win the 2002 contract.


A bitter war is erupting for control of the Alabama Statehouse and this time it is Republican versus Republican.

Republicans won a majority in the Alabama Legislature in 2010, but in 2014 many incumbents are facing primary party challenges.

Republican Senate leader Del Marsh called many of the challengers RINOs, or Republicans in name only. He said many were funded by the Alabama Education Association, which has often been at odds with current legislators.


Republican candidate for governor Stacy George says his state lottery proposal could produce up to $200 million annually to help five programs.

During a news conference Tuesday in Montgomery, George said he would divide the money between volunteer fire and rescue squads, technical college scholarships, voluntary pre-kindergarten, the state General Fund, and downtown revitalization projects. He says contracts for the revitalization would have to go to companies in the communities being served, which would generate jobs in each town.