Bentley impeachment committee to hire special counsel, Interactive study on Civil Rights Movement

Jul 11, 2016

A committee probing the possible impeachment of Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley is hiring special counsel to lead the investigation.  The House Judiciary Committee will meet Friday to discuss and approve the appointment.

The committee is looking into whether there are grounds to impeach the Republican governor in the wake of a sex-tinged scandal involving a former top aide.

This will be the committee's second meeting. Judiciary Committee Chairman Mike Jones, a Republican from Andalusia, said last month that the investigation could not begin in earnest until a special counsel was selected.

Twenty-three House members in April signed impeachment articles accusing Bentley of willful neglect of duty and corruption in office.

The committee will eventually make a recommendation to the full House on whether Bentley should be impeached.

Teachers will be able see many landmarks from the Civil Rights movement in the Yellowhammer State.

The Alabama Humanities Foundation has invited K-12 educators from across the country to participate in an interactive study on the movement.

Dionne* Clark is the program director for the foundation. She says the workshop session should help the participants understand what it was like for those fighting for rights.

“They’re heavily content based so the teachers walk away directly with an inside perspective how what the individuals apart of this movement how they participated in what they felt.”

The workshop is based in Birmingham and will run through Saturday.

Alabama is looking to better their education system and one group is working specifically to improve arts education.

The Alabama Alliance for Arts Education will hold their 20th annual workshop of fine arts for teachers across the state. Sustaining Artful Instruction and Learning or “Sail”, is meant for teachers to better understand the fine arts to add to other classes.

Tara Sartorius* is the program director for the group. She believes says this program will better teachers as a whole but isn’t just limited to this one workshop.

“Well I certainly hope that we can look for anyone who is interested in changing the way they teach and getting more hands on and thinking about integrating the arts in their teaching that they would think that the Alabama  Alliance for the Arts Education as a very positive resource.”

The workshop runs at the Huntington College campus in Montgomery till Friday.