Associated Press

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Farmers in Alabama's peanut belt are hopeful about their upcoming harvest.

Larry Wells of the Wiregrass Research and Extension Center says rainfall this year has been just what the crop needs: Not too dry and not too wet. That allows farmers more time to work in their fields to maintain the peanut plants.

Wells tells the Dothan Eagle that the crucial months for rain will still be August and September. He says receiving about 1 inch of rain a week will keep crops on the right path for harvest.

Another Alabama inmate was found stabbed in a state prison yard earlier this week.

Officials with the Alabama Department of Corrections say Timothy Robertson was fatally stabbed Tuesday night. Robertson is the third prisoner to be killed at Elmore Correctional Facility this year. Another inmate, whose identity has not yet been released, will be charged with Robertson’s murder.

Robertson’s death is the fourth killing of an Alabama prisoner this year, and six correctional officers have been injured in assaults at state prisons so far this year.

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is offering to withdraw from a GOP Senate primary if all other Republican candidates also agree to withdraw, paving the way for Attorney General Jeff Sessions to be the party's Senate nominee this fall.

 Brooks is a Sessions ally and says he cannot remain silent about the treatment Sessions is receiving from President Donald Trump.

One prisoner is dead and a correctional officer was stabbed in separate incidents in Alabama’s state prison system.

Alabama Department of Corrections spokesman Bob Horton says an Alabama correctional officer is in stable condition after being stabbed during lunch yesterday. 36-year-old Wendell Tyrell Jones used a makeshift weapon to stab the guard from behind in the dining hall of Bibb County Correctional Facility.

collapsed training facility
WKRG-TV

A new football practice facility at the University of South Alabama has collapsed during construction, according to school officials.

South Alabama athletic director Joel Erdmann says there weren’t any injuries after the Jaguar Training Center collapsed Saturday afternoon. He says the facility was currently under construction.

School spokesman Bob Lowry released a statement saying the facility fell within the construction limits of the site and says no workers were present in the area at the time.

The president of the Southern League says the minor league baseball team in Mobile is on the market. 

Lori Webb tells Al.com that there could be a potential sale of the BayBears. The league's vetting of a potential buyer could take about two months. The approval process comes shortly after it was reported that the BayBears could relocate to Madison.

Webb says it would be far down the road if such development is true. The vetting process of a potential buyer of BayBears could take about two months.

The deadline to register to vote is nearing in Alabama's U.S. Senate primary.

Voters have through July 31 to register to vote in the Aug. 15 primary. 

  Crowded fields of Republicans and Democrats are vying to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate.

A primary runoff, if needed, will be held on Sept. 26. The general election will be held Dec. 12.

A rare form of mad cow disease has been found in Alabama, according to state officials.

Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan released a statement saying atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy was confirmed in an 11 year old beef cow.

The U.S. Depertment of Agriculture says this is only the fifth case of this particular form of the disease ever confirmed in the United States.

McMillan says the disease was discovered during routine screening at a livestock market. The infected cow wasn’t slaughtered, and its meat didn’t enter the food chain.

Maj. Gen. Sheryl Gordon
Dave Martin / AP

The Alabama National Guard will soon be under female command for the first time in history.

Major General Sheryl Gordon was named by Governor Kay Ivey as the guard’s adjutant general yesterday. Ivey calls Gordon a “trailblazer and visionary leader” in a recent press release. Gordon is the first woman ever to hold that post.

Many saw the recent extension of the federal red snapper season as a boon for many industries on Alabama's gulf coast. But the measure isn’t popular with everyone.

Two environmental groups are suing the federal government for extending the season. The lawsuit filed by the Ocean Conservancy and the Environmental Defense Fund says the decision broke the law by ignoring scientific assessments, promoting overfishing, and failing to follow required procedures like providing adequate notice and time for public comment before making changes.

Police in Alabama and four other Southeastern states are cracking down on traffic violations this week in an effort to cut down on wrecks and traffic fatalities.

“Operation Southern Shield” starts today in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs oversees grants used for the program. They say officers will be looking to reduce the number of drivers speeding, driving impaired or distracted, and not wearing seatbelts.

Members of a city board of education in Alabama are looking to dismiss a lawsuit against them that centers on their vote not to retain the school system’s superintendent.

The four members of the Gadsden City School system had voted against renewing Superintendent Ed Miller’s contract. The Gadsden Times reports they voted over the three other members of the board, who claim they weren’t consulted about the vote.

Tuition will be increasing slightly for students in Alabama’s two-year college system.

The Tuscaloosa News reports trustees have approved a 1.4 percent tuition increase for Alabama’s Community College System. The price of each credit hour will be going up $2 to $119 for students who are Alabama residents. Nonresidents will be paying $234 per credit hour, beginning this fall.

Trustee chairman Al Thompson calls the rate hike “modest”. He says it’s part of an annual adjustment that was first established by the Alabama Board of Education, which used to operate the system.

President Donald Trump is nominating two attorneys to become federal judges for north Alabama.

 The White House says Annemarie Carney Axon and Liles C. Burke will both will U.S. District Court judgeships if confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Two new people are joining Alabama Governor Kay Ivey’s cabinet.

Governor Ivey’s office says Jim Purcell has just been named the acting secretary of Information Technology, and Todd Cotton is now the acting commissioner of the Alabama Department of Senior Services.

Purcell has worked as the chief operations officer of the Alabama Office of Information Technology since last December. That position involves overseeing all the shared services offered by the agency across the state.

An Alabama state court says a 12-year-old girl who was impregnated by a relative will be allowed to get an abortion without a parent’s consent.

Yesterday, the Alabama Civil Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a girl seeking a waiver from a state law that requires minors receive parental consent before having an abortion. The decision says a relative currently charged with statutory rape got the girl pregnant, and the girl was removed from her home after her mother reacted violently. The girl doesn’t know her father.

Authorities say a University of North Alabama police officer is currently on administrative leave after shooting a woman during a traffic stop.

 

The confrontation occurred at around 3 a.m. Sunday in Florence, Ala., according to the TimesDaily of Florence.

 

The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency released a statement saying the driver in the traffic stop allegedly tried to run over the campus officer, forcing the officer to fire multiple shots striking the vehicle. The driver then fled the scene. Photos show a red car crashed into a utility pole.

 

An Alabama man accused of plotting a terrorist attack is eligible to get out of jail, but a court still has to set conditions for his release.

WHNT-TV reports District Judge Schuyler Richardson of Madison County ruled Friday the court must set conditions for 22-year-old Aziz Sayyed's release to ensure he returns for trial and to protect the public. 

A July 19 hearing to determine the conditions has been set.

The state is locating farms that have been in the same family for at least 200 years as part of Alabama's bicentennial commemoration.  

The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries says it wants to highlight farms that have been owned by the same family for at least 200 years. But first, the agency has to locate those operations.

The Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals has directed a judge to redo the sentencing order for a man sentenced to die for killing his ex-girlfriend in 2011. 

 Appellate judges on Friday ruled that Cedric Jerome Floyd should get a new sentencing order. The court ruled that the judge who sentenced Floyd to the death penalty failed to adequately explain the finding, as required by law, that the crime was particularly heinous and warranted a death sentence.

State prosecutors are urging an appellate court to uphold the ethics conviction of former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard.  

The attorney general's office argued this week in a court filing that Hubbard's behavior was in clear violation of the law.

weather.gov

 Strong storms have caused isolated damage in north Alabama.  

The National Weather Service says storms with winds blowing as hard as 50 mph knocked down trees and toppled power lines in the northeast Alabama city of Gadsden on Wednesday.

    No injuries were reported, but storms were still moving through the region. Forecasters say heavy rain and more damaging winds were possible north of Interstate 20.    The weather service says strong storms also were developing in south Alabama.    

After a bloody stretch in the state’s capital, Montgomery officials are working to get guns off the streets by appealing to people's pocketbooks.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports CrimeStoppers and the Central Alabama Community Foundation partnered for a gun buyback program this past weekend, where people were offered cash in exchange for turning in weapons. Rifles, shotguns and functioning handguns were worth $50 each, and weapons considered high-capacity – able to shoot more than a regular 12-round magazine – were worth $100.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says he has questions he wants answered before turning over Alabama voter data to President Donald Trump's commission investigating alleged voter fraud.

 Merrill said Friday that there are a "number of questions we have to get answered."  He said security is one issue, but declined to name the other concerns.

The school board in Birmingham is working to prevent a charter school from opening in the city.

The board recently filed suit against the Alabama Public Charter School Commission in order to prevent STAR Academy from beginning operations. Board members say they denied a charter to start the school at the local level. They say that decision was improperly overruled by the state commission.

The commander of Redstone Arsenal says 911 calls about a potential active shooter prompted lockdown; no shooter was found.  

Authorities locked down post today amid reports of possible active shooter. About two hours later, the all-clear was given and officials said there were no confirmed injuries or arrests.

A community college in Alexander City, Alabama has been placed on probation due to financial issues.

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges recently put Central Alabama Community College on a 12-month probation, according to Al.com.

Central Alabama Community College President Susan Burrow says the probation is due to audit findings from previous years that at this point have mostly been resolved. Burrow says the probation won’t affect students or any school programs, and the college will retain its accreditation for the twelve-month period.

Tropical Storm Cindy dumped a lot of rain on the state of Alabama, and Governor Kay Ivey is now looking for federal help for the state's farmers due to potential crop losses.

Ivey sent a letter to U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Friday asking for a federal disaster declaration in some Alabama counties.

She wrote that a large number of Alabama agricultural producers have "experienced significant losses" because of Tropical Storm Cindy. Ivey says farmers in the southern and central portions of the state had been impacted the most.

The state of Alabama will stop administering the ACT Aspire Test.

The state Board of Education voted unanimously Wednesday not to renew the contract with ACT Aspire. State Superintendent Michael Sentance says there were “several issues” with last year’s iteration of the test. He says receipt of results were delayed, and when the state finally received the results, some of the data was incorrect.

An Alabama mayor is offering to take Confederate-related monuments recently disassembled in New Orleans.

Hanceville Mayor Kenneth Nail wrote to New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu, asking him to consider donating the monuments for display in Veterans Memorial Park in Hanceville. The town of about 3,250 people is about 40 miles north of Birmingham.

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