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The Southern Poverty Law Center says it has added Heather Heyer's name to its Wall of Tolerance at the Civil Rights Memorial Center.

 The SPLC said on its website Friday that it had added a tribute to Heyer to its center in Montgomery, Alabama.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey appears closer to announcing an upcoming run for governor after filing paperwork to create a campaign organization.

Earlier this week, Ivey filed paperwork with Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill's office to reserve the name "Kay Ivey for Governor Inc." for a nonprofit organization. Ivey spokesman Daniel Sparkman says Ivey is seriously considering running in 2018 and is "taking the steps necessary to be successful."

Sitting Alabama Senator Luther Strange will be facing off with former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore in a runoff for the Republican nomination for Senate.

Moore forced Strange into a runoff in yesterday’s primary election, even though the former Alabama Attorney General was backed by an endorsement from President Donald Trump and millions of campaign dollars from establishment Republicans.

Alabama Senator and former Attorney General Luther Strange is pulling out all the stops to maintain his Senate seat – including calls from the President.

Strange’s campaign announced yesterday that President Donald Trump has recorded robocalls telling Alabama voters to “go to the polls and vote for Luther Strange.” Trump says his administration is accomplishing many of his campaign promises, but he “needs Luther to help us out.”

leagueofthesouth.com

Some white Southerners are again advocating for what the Confederacy tried and failed to achieve in the 1860s: secession from the Union.

 

So-called Southern nationalists are among the demonstrators who are fighting the removal of Confederate monuments around the South. They say it's time for Southern states to secede again and become independent of the United States.

Alabama candidates in the race for Attorney General Jeff Sessions' former U.S. Senate seat spent the weekend in a flurry of last-minute campaign stops ahead of Tuesday's primary.  

Republican Senator Luther Strange, who currently holds the seat, said Saturday that President Donald Trump's endorsement was "critical" in the campaign's homestretch.

Strange faces a slate of Republican challengers, including former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, U.S. Representative Mo Brooks, state Senator Trip Pittman and Christian Coalition leader Randy Brinson.

A judge has dropped sex charges against two school employees, saying the state law is overbroad and unconstitutional.

Morgan County Circuit Judge Glenn Thompson dismissed charges against 44-year-old Carrie Witt and 27-year-old David Solomon yesterday. Witt is a former teacher at Decatur High School who was arrested in March 2016 for allegedly having sex with two Decatur High students, one 17 and one 18. Solomon is a former contract teacher at Falkville High School accused of having sex with a 17-year-old Falkville High student.

A hospital serving one of Alabama's poorest and most rural counties is scheduled to close by month's end.

George Alford, board chairman of Camden's J. Paul Jones Hospital, tells WSFA-TV that the hospital is losing $1 million annually. He says the hospital struggles with falling population, poverty and cuts to Medicaid and Medicare.

A deadly mosquito-borne virus has been detected in south Alabama.

AL.com reports mosquitoes in parts of Mobile County are carrying Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), a disease that Mobile County Health Officer Dr. Bernard H. Eichold II says has a human mortality rate between 50 to 75 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describe EEE as "one of the most severe mosquito-transmitted diseases in the United States", but it is also very rare, with only a few cases reported across the country each year.

A park in Alabama is shutting down its greyhound racing operation by the end of the month, which means nearly 400 dogs will need new homes.

Wind Creek Hospitality recently announced that the Mobile Greyhound Park will stop live greyhound racing at the end of the month in response to declining market demand.

Alabama Sighthound Adoptions President Darla Dean recently told WALA-TV that organizations across the country have agreed to adopt the dogs. Most will go to homes, but a few that are still in top racing shape will move to other greyhound tracks.

The Gulf of Mexico is setting an unwanted record – this year’s “dead zone”, where there’s too little oxygen to support any marine life, is the largest ever measured.

Scientists say this year, the oxygen-depleted region is about the size of New Jersey, covering 8,776 square miles. Scientist Nancy Rabalais has been measuring the area since 1985. She and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released their latest findings yesterday.

Carnival Cruise Line is extending its contract to base a cruise ship on the Alabama coast in Mobile.

 Mayor Sandy Stimpson says the Miami-based company is extending its deal to sail from Mobile through December 2018. That means the city won't endure a repeat of 2011, when the company ended service from Mobile.

    Carnival currently offers four- and five-day cruises aboard the 855-foot Fantasy from the Alabama Cruise Terminal.    The company's original 13-month contract to operate in Mobile would have ended in December.    

The city of Gulf Shores is getting more serious about the potential of forming a separate citywide school system.

Last night, Gulf Shores City Council members approved conducting a feasibility study for the project. That comes after a citizens group presented city leaders with a petition supporting the formation of a city school system. The group also provided $12,000 to help fund a study on whether the town should leave the Baldwin County school system.

Authorities say the dozen inmates that escaped from a county jail in Alabama over the weekend did so using peanut butter.

Walker County Sheriff James Underwood says the inmates used the peanut butter to change the number above a cell door to match the number identifying a door leading outside. So when an inmate asked a young and inexperienced jailer to let him into his cell, the jailer opened the outside door instead.

The dozen inmates were then able to flee, tossing off their uniforms and using blankets to scale a razor wire fence.

Farmers in Alabama's peanut belt are hopeful about their upcoming harvest.

Larry Wells of the Wiregrass Research and Extension Center says rainfall this year has been just what the crop needs: Not too dry and not too wet. That allows farmers more time to work in their fields to maintain the peanut plants.

Wells tells the Dothan Eagle that the crucial months for rain will still be August and September. He says receiving about 1 inch of rain a week will keep crops on the right path for harvest.

Another Alabama inmate was found stabbed in a state prison yard earlier this week.

Officials with the Alabama Department of Corrections say Timothy Robertson was fatally stabbed Tuesday night. Robertson is the third prisoner to be killed at Elmore Correctional Facility this year. Another inmate, whose identity has not yet been released, will be charged with Robertson’s murder.

Robertson’s death is the fourth killing of an Alabama prisoner this year, and six correctional officers have been injured in assaults at state prisons so far this year.

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is offering to withdraw from a GOP Senate primary if all other Republican candidates also agree to withdraw, paving the way for Attorney General Jeff Sessions to be the party's Senate nominee this fall.

 Brooks is a Sessions ally and says he cannot remain silent about the treatment Sessions is receiving from President Donald Trump.

One prisoner is dead and a correctional officer was stabbed in separate incidents in Alabama’s state prison system.

Alabama Department of Corrections spokesman Bob Horton says an Alabama correctional officer is in stable condition after being stabbed during lunch yesterday. 36-year-old Wendell Tyrell Jones used a makeshift weapon to stab the guard from behind in the dining hall of Bibb County Correctional Facility.

collapsed training facility
WKRG-TV

A new football practice facility at the University of South Alabama has collapsed during construction, according to school officials.

South Alabama athletic director Joel Erdmann says there weren’t any injuries after the Jaguar Training Center collapsed Saturday afternoon. He says the facility was currently under construction.

School spokesman Bob Lowry released a statement saying the facility fell within the construction limits of the site and says no workers were present in the area at the time.

The president of the Southern League says the minor league baseball team in Mobile is on the market. 

Lori Webb tells Al.com that there could be a potential sale of the BayBears. The league's vetting of a potential buyer could take about two months. The approval process comes shortly after it was reported that the BayBears could relocate to Madison.

Webb says it would be far down the road if such development is true. The vetting process of a potential buyer of BayBears could take about two months.

The deadline to register to vote is nearing in Alabama's U.S. Senate primary.

Voters have through July 31 to register to vote in the Aug. 15 primary. 

  Crowded fields of Republicans and Democrats are vying to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate.

A primary runoff, if needed, will be held on Sept. 26. The general election will be held Dec. 12.

A rare form of mad cow disease has been found in Alabama, according to state officials.

Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan released a statement saying atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy was confirmed in an 11 year old beef cow.

The U.S. Depertment of Agriculture says this is only the fifth case of this particular form of the disease ever confirmed in the United States.

McMillan says the disease was discovered during routine screening at a livestock market. The infected cow wasn’t slaughtered, and its meat didn’t enter the food chain.

Maj. Gen. Sheryl Gordon
Dave Martin / AP

The Alabama National Guard will soon be under female command for the first time in history.

Major General Sheryl Gordon was named by Governor Kay Ivey as the guard’s adjutant general yesterday. Ivey calls Gordon a “trailblazer and visionary leader” in a recent press release. Gordon is the first woman ever to hold that post.

Many saw the recent extension of the federal red snapper season as a boon for many industries on Alabama's gulf coast. But the measure isn’t popular with everyone.

Two environmental groups are suing the federal government for extending the season. The lawsuit filed by the Ocean Conservancy and the Environmental Defense Fund says the decision broke the law by ignoring scientific assessments, promoting overfishing, and failing to follow required procedures like providing adequate notice and time for public comment before making changes.

Police in Alabama and four other Southeastern states are cracking down on traffic violations this week in an effort to cut down on wrecks and traffic fatalities.

“Operation Southern Shield” starts today in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs oversees grants used for the program. They say officers will be looking to reduce the number of drivers speeding, driving impaired or distracted, and not wearing seatbelts.

Members of a city board of education in Alabama are looking to dismiss a lawsuit against them that centers on their vote not to retain the school system’s superintendent.

The four members of the Gadsden City School system had voted against renewing Superintendent Ed Miller’s contract. The Gadsden Times reports they voted over the three other members of the board, who claim they weren’t consulted about the vote.

Tuition will be increasing slightly for students in Alabama’s two-year college system.

The Tuscaloosa News reports trustees have approved a 1.4 percent tuition increase for Alabama’s Community College System. The price of each credit hour will be going up $2 to $119 for students who are Alabama residents. Nonresidents will be paying $234 per credit hour, beginning this fall.

Trustee chairman Al Thompson calls the rate hike “modest”. He says it’s part of an annual adjustment that was first established by the Alabama Board of Education, which used to operate the system.

President Donald Trump is nominating two attorneys to become federal judges for north Alabama.

 The White House says Annemarie Carney Axon and Liles C. Burke will both will U.S. District Court judgeships if confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Two new people are joining Alabama Governor Kay Ivey’s cabinet.

Governor Ivey’s office says Jim Purcell has just been named the acting secretary of Information Technology, and Todd Cotton is now the acting commissioner of the Alabama Department of Senior Services.

Purcell has worked as the chief operations officer of the Alabama Office of Information Technology since last December. That position involves overseeing all the shared services offered by the agency across the state.

An Alabama state court says a 12-year-old girl who was impregnated by a relative will be allowed to get an abortion without a parent’s consent.

Yesterday, the Alabama Civil Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a girl seeking a waiver from a state law that requires minors receive parental consent before having an abortion. The decision says a relative currently charged with statutory rape got the girl pregnant, and the girl was removed from her home after her mother reacted violently. The girl doesn’t know her father.

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