Water Wars

Governor Robert Bentley was not present at a private meeting between the governors of Florida and Georgia to discuss a long-running water dispute.

The meeting comes as the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to hear a challenge from Florida seeking to limit Georgia's withdrawals from the Chattahoochee River. Alabama, Florida and Georgia have been battling for decades over rights to take water from the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint river system.

http://www.sam.usace.army.mil/lanier/ / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

A water plan passed by the U.S. Senate will not limit Georgia's water use from two federal reservoirs, a restriction sought by lawmakers in Alabama and Florida.

The Senate voted 83-14 on Wednesday to approve legislation authorizing a number of water projects nationally.

A long-running water dispute in the Southeast provoked a political clash over the bill.

Southern Environmental Law Center

  Georgia lawmakers are seeking to redraw the state's border with Tennessee and have authorized the state attorney general to file a lawsuit if negotiations fail.

The House voted 157-13 Tuesday to adopt a resolution seeking a strip of land leading to the Tennessee River. The offer will be sent to Tennessee officials, who have rebuffed previous efforts.

A federal agency says it has the legal authority to give Georgia more water from a disputed reservoir, though it has not made a final decision on how much to release.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in documents released Tuesday that it has the legal ability to give metro Atlanta communities access to 705 million gallons of water per day from Lake Lanier on the Chattahoochee River to meet needs through 2030.

That reservoir is the focus of a long-running legal dispute between Alabama, Florida and Georgia.