A lawyer for VictoryLand owner Milton McGregor says he hopes to have the casino reopened by Christmas, despite a court order allowing the state to keep his seized gambling machines.

McGregor's attorney Joe Espy says VictoryLand will have to obtain new machines in order to reopen. However, Espy believes the casino will be able to do that.

The state has been in a long-running legal battle over the slot machine look-alikes.

The attorney general's office seized over 1600 electronic bingo machines and $260,000 in cash during a 2013 raid at VictoryLand.

Alabama’s Attorney General Luther Strange says the state's litigation against casinos will go forward despite the governor's order that local law enforcement should take over gambling enforcement.

Strange said yesterday he had been assured by the governor's legal adviser that the executive order issued by the governor had no impact on the state's pending litigation.

Gov. Robert Bentley signed an executive order recently saying local district attorneys and sheriffs should be in charge of gambling enforcement.

Alabama education professionals are attending this week’s MEGA Conference in Mobile.

Over 2000 individuals preregistered for the event including teachers, administrators, and school nurses. The conference provides professional learning opportunities to help educators enhance their job skills. It's also a chance to build skills to work with students in the classroom. The conference runs until Friday at noon.

VictoryLand Casino is asking the state of Alabama to return seized gambling machines and cash as the Macon County casino looks to reopen.

Lawyers for VictoryLand filed the motion yesterday after a judge ruled against the state's 2013 effort to close the casino.

Circuit Judge William Shashy ruled last month the state’s seizure violated the principle of equal protection since other electronic bingo operations remained in business in Alabama. Shashy dismissed the state's attempt to keep 1,615 machines and more than $260,000 seized in the raid.

Attorneys for VictoryLand are scheduled to begin presenting their side in a trial in Montgomery that could determine the future of the closed casino in Macon County.

Circuit Judge William Shashy heard two days of testimony from investigators with the state attorney general's office about how they raided the casino in 2013. They talked about how they seized 1,600 machines that Attorney General Luther Strange says are illegal. He wants the judge to order the machines destroyed.

AP Photo/Montgomery Advertiser, Mickey Welsh

A lawyer for the closed VictoryLand casino in Shorter is arguing that other businesses in Alabama are still operating the same gambling machines VictoryLand had.

A civil trial opened Tuesday in Montgomery over whether the attorney general can destroy gambling machines seized in a 2013 raid.

VictoryLand attorney Joe Espy says electronic bingo games like the ones from VictoryLand are operating at two locations in Greene County and one in Houston County.

A trial is set to open over whether the state government can destroy 1,600 gaming machines and keep $223,000 in cash seized in a raid at VictoryLand casino in Shorter.

The non-jury trial starts Tuesday morning in Montgomery before Circuit Judge William Shashy.

Attorney General Luther Strange's staff is arguing the machines seized in the raid last year in Macon County are illegal slots.

A trial starting Tuesday in Montgomery could determine the future of what was once Alabama's largest casino.

VictoryLand casino in Shorter has been closed since Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange raided it in February 2013.

A civil trial starting Tuesday will determine whether the state can destroy the 1,615 gambling machines seized in the raid and keep the $223,405 in cash that was confiscated.

Strange says the games are illegal slot machines that should be destroyed.

The judge has delayed a trial over the state attorney general's raid of VictoryLand casino in Shorter.

Attorney General Luther Strange sought the delay because the gambling expert used by the attorney general's office for at least a decade died recently. Bob Sertell died May 6 in Vineland, New Jersey, from cardiac problems.

Circuit Judge William Shashy signed an order Thursday postponing the trial from June 23 to Sept. 9 to give the attorney general time to find a new expert witness.

The state attorney general's office used a century-old gambling case to get a rare, but not unprecedented, search warrant to raid VictoryLand casino in Shorter.

Macon County Circuit Judge Tom Young initially refused to give the attorney general a search warrant. Attorney General Luther Strange appealed to the Alabama Supreme Court. He cited an 1899 case where a justice of the peace denied an arrest warrant based on an incorrect interpretation of the law, and the Supreme Court ordered it issued.

Attorneys say a $64 million court judgment against VictoryLand casino in Macon County and its owner, Milton McGregor, won't be affected by the Macon County sheriff being dropped from the litigation.

Lucky Palace and 15 charities sued VictoryLand, McGregor and Sheriff David Warren, alleging they worked together to keep a second casino from being built in the central Alabama county to compete with VictoryLand. A jury in May returned a $64 million verdict against McGregor and VictoryLand. It ruled the sheriff misinterpreted the county's rules for electronic bingo.