U.S. Supreme Court

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Civil rights advocates plan to rally in Washington, D.C. while the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on whether to uphold Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act.

Southern Christian Leadership Conference CEO Charles Steele says the group of about 150 will leave Washington D.C. Feb. 27 after a rally and press conference outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Section 5 of the act bars states from altering voting qualifications and procedures without federal approval.

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The Supreme Court will hear a challenge to campaign finance laws limiting how much an individual can give to political campaigns.

The justices on Tuesday decided to hear an appeal from Shaun McCutcheon of Alabama and the Republican National Committee. They are arguing that it's unconstitutional to stop a donor from giving more than $46,200 to political candidates and $70,800 to political committees and PACs.

McCutcheon says he accepts that he can only give $2,500 to a single candidate but says he should be able to give that amount to as many GOP candidates as he wants.

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The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Feb. 27 in efforts by an Alabama county to stop enforcement of part of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The court initially agreed in November to hear the case brought by Shelby County, and it has now set the date for attorneys to present their arguments.

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The state of Alabama is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review part of its law cracking down on illegal immigration.

The state asked the judges Tuesday to review a section of the law that makes it a crime to assist, harbor or transport anyone who's in the country illegally.

Opponents of the law have called the section inhumane, but the state says it doesn't conflict with federal law. It also says the justices haven't reviewed a similar law in other states including Arizona.

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The Supreme Court says it will consider eliminating the government's chief weapon against racial discrimination at polling places since the 1960s.

Acting three days after the election, the justices are agreeing Friday to hear a constitutional challenge to the part of the landmark Voting Rights Act that requires all or parts of 16 states with a history of discrimination in voting to get federal approval before making any changes in the way they hold elections.