U.S. Senate

Alabama State House
Jay Williams / Flickr

In the wake of the first Democratic U.S. Senate victory in Alabama in a quarter-century, state lawmakers are working to get rid of special elections for Senate.

House members voted 67 to 31 yesterday in favor of a bill that would change how Senate vacancies are filled in Alabama. Instead of a special election, the governor would appoint an interim senator who would serve until the next statewide general election – up to two years.

Corfman 14
Family photo

A woman who says failed U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore molested her when she was 14 has filed a defamation lawsuit against Moore and his campaign.

Leigh Corfman filed the lawsuit yesterday. She argues Moore and his campaign defamed her and made false statements as they denied various sexual misconduct accusations in the midst of the U.S. Senate race.

Corfman says Moore sexually abused her when she was 14 and then "called me a liar and immoral when I publicly disclosed his misconduct."

Hobson
Brynn Anderson / AP

The man who ran former Chief Justice Roy Moore’s failed bid for U.S. Senate in Alabama is now running for a U.S. congressional seat himself.

Rich Hobson announced yesterday that he is running as a Republican for the 2nd District congressional seat currently held by U.S. Representative Martha Roby. That district includes most of metropolitan Montgomery and the Wiregrass region in southeast Alabama. Roby won her last bid for re-election in 2016 with less than 50 percent of the vote, after withdrawing her support of then-presidential candidate Donald Trump.

Roy Moore has filed a lawsuit to try to stop Alabama officials from certifying Democrat Doug Jones as the winner of the U.S. Senate race.

The court filing occurred just ahead of today's meeting of a state canvassing board to officially declare Jones the winner of the Dec. 12 special election. Jones defeated Moore by about 20,000 votes.

Moore's attorney wrote that he believes there were irregularities during the election and says there should be a fraud investigation and eventually a new election.

Doug Jones won last night's special election for U.S. Senate, defeating Roy Moore by 1.5% of the vote in last night’s election. Moore’s camp, though, is looking for a possible recount.

Moore refused to concede the election last night, and told his supporters “When the vote is this close, it’s not over. We still have to go by the rules, by this recount provision.”

With ~92% of precincts reporting, multiple media outlets report Democrat Doug Jones has won Alabama's special election for U.S. Senate.

Statewide, UNOFFICIAL election results are as follows:

Doug Jones: 589,531 (49.6%)

Roy Moore: 581,225 (48.9%)

Write-ins (total): 18,727 (1.6%)

Pensacola rally snow
Alex AuBuchon / APR

President Donald Trump held a campaign-style rally in Pensacola as part of a weekend trip across the Gulf Coast – less than 20 miles from the Alabama state line and just four days before the hotly contested Senate election between Doug Jones and Roy Moore. Some political experts believed the event would be a de facto campaign stop for Roy Moore. Others said Trump was there to thank the Pensacola area for their strong support during last year’s election. Turns out, it was a little of both.

The Senate is debating its tax overhaul bill. To pass it, the Republicans need strong party unity and leaders have been working on changes to firm up support among uncommitted lawmakers, as the GOP can only afford two no votes from its party and still pass the legislation. But even if the Senate does pass the bill by the end of the week, it will have to reconcile its version with the House's. click the title to watch the debate unfold.

A former Marine who has launched a write-in campaign for the U.S. Senate seat in Alabama says he believes residents are not being properly represented by the two other candidates.

Ret. Col. Lee Busby appeared on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" this morning. He says winning is "doable" even though the election is only two weeks away. Busby is a former aide to John Kelly who is now President Donald Trump's chief of staff. He is running as an independent candidate against Democrat Doug Jones and Republican Roy Moore.

A conservative group known for clandestine, undercover investigations has been tied to a woman who falsely told the Washington Post that Roy Moore had impregnated her as a teenager.

That’s according to a story published in the Washington Post yesterday. Moore has been accused of multiple instances of sexual misconduct recently. But the paper determined that one accuser who approached them earlier this month, identified as Jaime Phillips, made up a story likely designed to embarrass the paper.

Alabama voters have until 11:59 p.m. this evening to register to vote in order to participate in the Dec. 12 special election for the U.S. Senate between Democratic nominee Doug Jones and Republican nominee Roy Moore.

Under state law, the last day to register is the 15th day before an election, which is today. Voters can register during normal office hours at county board of registrars' offices and other designated locations in each county. Or voters can register online until 11:59 p.m. tonight.

Roy Moore
NBC News

President Donald Trump is again coming to the side of embattled Republican Roy Moore by bashing the Democratic nominee in a hotly contested Alabama U.S. Senate race.

Trump tweets "the last thing we need" in Alabama and the Senate is a "puppet" of the Democratic congressional leadership. Trump contends Democrat Doug Jones — a former prosecutor — is "WEAK" on crime and border security, and "BAD" for the military, veterans, and gun rights. Trump claims Jones is itching to raise taxes "TO THE SKY" and would be "a disaster."

Leigh Corfman
NBC

A woman accusing Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of initiating sexual contact when she was 14 said on national televison today that she was "absolutely not" paid to tell her story publicly.

The declaration by Leigh Corfman on NBC's "Today" show comes after Moore's supporters claimed without evidence that reporters were offering thousands of dollars to women for accusations.

The state election is being closely watched as several GOP senators have called Moore to drop out, and President Donald Trump has remained mostly quiet on the issue.

Rev. Barber
Jay Reeves / AP

A leading figure among religious liberals says the candidacy of Roy Moore for U.S. Senate is a struggle for the "soul of the nation."

The remarks today by the Rev. William J. Barber come one day after a letter signed by dozens of progressive pastors in Alabama said Moore — dogged by recent allegations of inappropriate conduct toward teenage girls decades ago — is unfit to serve.

Democratic U.S. Senate Candidate Doug Jones has seen a major bump in fundraising efforts, according to campaign officials.

According to the Alabama Political Reporter, over the first three months of the campaign through July 31, Jones only raised $300,000. Now the campaign says Jones has about $1.3 million, a million of which is cash on hand as of the end of the third quarter. Those numbers have not been independently verified, as the third-quarter Federal Election Commission fundraising reports were due on Sunday but have not yet been made public.

1 Dexter Avenue
Chris Pruitt / Wikimedia

U.S. Senate candidate and former Alabama chief justice Roy Moore is facing additional scrutiny over personal compensation from the legal charity he founded.

Property records show the Foundation for Moral Law gave Moore a nearly $400,000 promissory note and mortgage on the group’s historic building in downtown Montgomery. The board of the foundation says the arrangement was to make up for unpaid salary promised to Moore as the organization’s president. That financial stake in the building was later boosted twice and now sits at $540,000.

Tomorrow is the Republican runoff election between sitting U.S. Senator Luther Strange and former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, and the White House is suggesting it won’t really be that big a defeat if their candidate loses.

When the scandal-plagued former Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley appointed his then-attorney general Luther Strange to the U.S. Senate, Bentley apparently considered it a good thing that he would get to name a new attorney general.

President Trump will be hitting the campaign trail in Alabama this coming weekend in hopes of boosting Luther Strange ahead of next week’s Senate primary runoff.

President Trump made the announcement via Twitter, saying he’d be in Huntsville Saturday night to support Luther Strange for Senate and that “’Big Luther’ is a great guy who gets things done!”

Sitting Alabama Senator Luther Strange will be facing off with former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore in a runoff for the Republican nomination for Senate.

Moore forced Strange into a runoff in yesterday’s primary election, even though the former Alabama Attorney General was backed by an endorsement from President Donald Trump and millions of campaign dollars from establishment Republicans.

Alabama Senator and former Attorney General Luther Strange is pulling out all the stops to maintain his Senate seat – including calls from the President.

Strange’s campaign announced yesterday that President Donald Trump has recorded robocalls telling Alabama voters to “go to the polls and vote for Luther Strange.” Trump says his administration is accomplishing many of his campaign promises, but he “needs Luther to help us out.”

AP

Primary elections for the race to fill Jeff Sessions’ former U.S. Senate seat are taking place a week from today, and one candidate just picked up a high-profile endorsement.

Martial artist and action star Chuck Norris has announced his support for former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, according to multiple news outlets. Norris is best known for starring in “Walker, Texas Ranger” and is a longtime supporter of the former chief justice.

Mo Brooks
Getty

The race to fill Alabama’s second U.S. Senate seat is heating up, and a recent informal poll could spell bad news for the incumbent.

Nine candidates, both Republican and Democrat, vying for Jeff Sessions’ former Senate seat participated in a candidate forum and straw poll last night in Huntsville. Al.com reports the event was organized by the Christian Citizen Task Force, with over 300 people in attendance.

healthcare protest
Lawrence Specker / al.com

Protestors gathered in multiple Alabama cities yesterday to voice their opposition to a proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act.

In Mobile, Al.com reports around 100 people gathered in front of the federal courthouse yesterday evening. The event was in part to promote organizers’ demand for Alabama U.S. Senators Richard Shelby and Luther Strange to actually meet with their constituents ahead of a healthcare vote in the Senate.

The Senate Leadership Fund is planning a $2.6 million television ad buy on behalf of Senator Luther Strange as the group seeks to ward off challengers for the Senate seat previously held by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The super political action committee, with ties to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, announced the buy yesterday in a show of fiscal force leading up to the Aug. 15 Republican primary.

Senate Leadership Fund spokesman Chris Pack said the buy is just a fraction of what the group plans on spending to support Strange.

The race to more permanently fill the U.S. Senate Seat formerly held by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions is heating up. But one potential candidate is complaining that GOP officials are treating appointee Luther Strange as an incumbent, and discouraging challengers from running against him.

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is running for the U.S. Senate.

Moore made the announcement on the steps of the Alabama Capitol this afternoon.

Speculation has swirled that Moore might run for another office after being suspended from the bench.

Moore will run in what is expected to be a crowded GOP primary to fill the seat vacated by now U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Another challenger has announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by former Attorney General Luther Strange.

Dr. Randy Brinson, a Montgomery gastroenterologist and chairman of the Christian Coalition of Alabama, announced Monday he is running to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions' former Senate seat.

Brinson is the founder of Redeem The Vote, a group aimed at getting young evangelical Christians involved in politics. In his announcement, Brinson said voters are frustrated with "corruption, self-dealing and venality of politicians."

State Auditor Questions Legality of Senate Vote

Feb 16, 2017

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley's plans for an election to replace Alabama U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions are drawing widespread criticism.

Bentley wants to schedule the election for November 2018. Jeff Sessions vacated the seat when he was appointed as US Attorney General. State election law says if the vacancy occurs within sixty days, four months, or a longer amount of time from the regular election, the vote must be held "forthwith". The 2018 regular election is twenty-one months away.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley has announced the special election to fill the Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions won’t be held until next year.

Governor Bentley’s office issued a news release yesterday saying a special primary election would be held June 5, 2018, with a primary runoff taking place July 17 if necessary. The special general election will be held on November 6, 2018. Those dates coordinate exactly with the 2018 General Election.

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