U.S. Senate

healthcare protest
Lawrence Specker / al.com

Protestors gathered in multiple Alabama cities yesterday to voice their opposition to a proposed replacement for the Affordable Care Act.

In Mobile, Al.com reports around 100 people gathered in front of the federal courthouse yesterday evening. The event was in part to promote organizers’ demand for Alabama U.S. Senators Richard Shelby and Luther Strange to actually meet with their constituents ahead of a healthcare vote in the Senate.

The Senate Leadership Fund is planning a $2.6 million television ad buy on behalf of Senator Luther Strange as the group seeks to ward off challengers for the Senate seat previously held by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The super political action committee, with ties to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, announced the buy yesterday in a show of fiscal force leading up to the Aug. 15 Republican primary.

Senate Leadership Fund spokesman Chris Pack said the buy is just a fraction of what the group plans on spending to support Strange.

The race to more permanently fill the U.S. Senate Seat formerly held by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions is heating up. But one potential candidate is complaining that GOP officials are treating appointee Luther Strange as an incumbent, and discouraging challengers from running against him.

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is running for the U.S. Senate.

Moore made the announcement on the steps of the Alabama Capitol this afternoon.

Speculation has swirled that Moore might run for another office after being suspended from the bench.

Moore will run in what is expected to be a crowded GOP primary to fill the seat vacated by now U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Another challenger has announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by former Attorney General Luther Strange.

Dr. Randy Brinson, a Montgomery gastroenterologist and chairman of the Christian Coalition of Alabama, announced Monday he is running to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions' former Senate seat.

Brinson is the founder of Redeem The Vote, a group aimed at getting young evangelical Christians involved in politics. In his announcement, Brinson said voters are frustrated with "corruption, self-dealing and venality of politicians."

State Auditor Questions Legality of Senate Vote

Feb 16, 2017

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley's plans for an election to replace Alabama U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions are drawing widespread criticism.

Bentley wants to schedule the election for November 2018. Jeff Sessions vacated the seat when he was appointed as US Attorney General. State election law says if the vacancy occurs within sixty days, four months, or a longer amount of time from the regular election, the vote must be held "forthwith". The 2018 regular election is twenty-one months away.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley has announced the special election to fill the Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions won’t be held until next year.

Governor Bentley’s office issued a news release yesterday saying a special primary election would be held June 5, 2018, with a primary runoff taking place July 17 if necessary. The special general election will be held on November 6, 2018. Those dates coordinate exactly with the 2018 General Election.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley has appointed the state’s Attorney General Luther Strange to replace Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate.

Sessions was confirmed yesterday as the 84th Attorney General of the United States, leaving a vacancy for Alabama’s representation in the Senate. Strange will begin serving in the Senate immediately and will hold the position until a special election is held during next year’s general elections. The winner of that election will serve the remainder of Sessions’ term, which ends in 2020.

Sessions
AP

Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions is expected to face his peers in the U.S. Senate this evening in his bid to become the next Attorney General.

Sessions is widely expected to win confirmation as Attorney General. Reports indicate he has unanimous partisan support, and at least one Democratic Senator, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, has pledged his support for Sessions.

Governor Robert Bentley is naming six finalists for the U.S. Senate seat now held by attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions.  

Bentley's list includes U.S. Representative Robert Aderholt of Haleyville and the pro tem of the State Senate, Del Marsh of Anniston.

Others include State Attorney General Luther Strange; Bentley appointee Jim Byard; state Representative Connie Rowe of Jasper; and former state legislator Perry Hooper Jr. of Montgomery.

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee was scheduled to vote on Senator Jeff Sessions’ confirmation as the next U.S. Attorney General earlier this week. But that vote has been delayed until next Tuesday.

Senator Sessions has faced intense criticism from the left for his conservative voting record, and civil rights advocates including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People have pointed to allegations of racist behavior.

Sessions
AP

Lawsuits have been filed claiming President Donald Trump’s foreign business dealings violate the Constitution. The impending litigation could test the relationship between President Trump and his pick for U.S. Attorney General – Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions.

Joyce White Vance
Wikimedia

U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance has announced her intent to retire from the Department of Justice.

Vance, whose district includes the 31 northernmost counties of Alabama, announced yesterday that her last day as U.S. Attorney will be Jan. 19.

Vance has spent 25 years as a federal prosecutor and was one of the first five U.S. Attorneys nominated by President Barack Obama. The Senate unanimously confirmed her nomination in 2009.

Before that, Vance spent 18 years in the federal prosecutor's office, last serving as chief of its Appellate Division.

Shelby wins U.S. Senate Race

Nov 8, 2016

Republican U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby will spend a sixth term in Washington.

Shelby easily defeated Democratic challenger Ron Crumpton. Crumpton is best known in the state as an advocate for legalizing medicinal marijuana.

The 82-year-old senator was first elected as Democrat in 1986, but switched to the GOP in 1994. He faced no significant opposition in 2004 and 2006, as right-leaning scorecards ranked him as one of the most conservative members of the U.S. Senate.

Governor Robert Bentley testified before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee in Washington yesterday. Alabama Public Radio’s Stan Ingold reports the Governor was highlighting Alabama’s prison reform efforts.

The goal of the committee’s hearing is to share lessons on successful criminal justice reform from states like Alabama. Several federal reform bills are currently before the U.S. House and Senate covering topics like reducing repeat offenders, changing federal sentencing rules and guidelines, and improving prison practices.

Sessions
AP

A spokesman to Sen. Mike Enzi says the Wyoming Republican is seeking the chairmanship up the Senate Budget Committee, setting up a showdown next month with Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama for the important post.

Sessions is currently the top Republican on the Budget Committee but Enzi technically has seniority over Sessions even though both were elected to the Senate in 1996.

http://www.sam.usace.army.mil/lanier/ / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

A water plan passed by the U.S. Senate will not limit Georgia's water use from two federal reservoirs, a restriction sought by lawmakers in Alabama and Florida.

The Senate voted 83-14 on Wednesday to approve legislation authorizing a number of water projects nationally.

A long-running water dispute in the Southeast provoked a political clash over the bill.

"Senate leaders have reversed course and decided to stage showdown votes later today on rival Democratic and Republican plans for extending broad tax cuts next year that will otherwise expire in January," The Associated Press writes.

So, Democrats will get the chance to cast "yea" votes on their plan to extend the so-called Bush tax cuts only for those earning less than $250,000 a year. Republicans will get the chance to cast "yea" votes on their plan to extend the tax cuts for everyone.