UPS plane crash victims

Hal Yeager/AP

People living near the site of last week's cargo jet crash at Birmingham's airport say they're worried about safety.

   The head of a community association, Robert Walker, addressed members of the city's airport authority on Monday.

   Walker says residents fear another crash. He says they want assurances that big planes like the UPS A300 jet that went down last Wednesday won't be using the runway nearest their homes.

   The jet clipped trees around homes before crashing about a mile from the end of the runway.

Nation Transportation Safety Board /

Federal investigators say flight recorders show that pilots of a UPS plane that crashed in Birmingham received warnings about their rate of descent moments before impact.

National Transportation Safety Board member Robert Sumwalt told reporters Friday a data recorder captured the first of two audible warnings in the cockpit before impact. Sumwalt says the warnings indicated the A300 cargo plane was descending at a rate outside normal parameters given its altitude.

But Sumwalt says investigators haven't made any determination on the actual cause of the crash.

Ralph Hicks / National Transportation Safety Board

An Alabama medical examiner has identified the two crew members who died in the crash of a UPS plane this week.

   The Jefferson County, Ala., medical examiner on Thursday night identified the victims as Capt. Cerea Beal, Jr., 58, of Matthews, N.C. and First Officer Shanda Fanning, 37, of Lynchburg, Tenn.

   An ex-Marine, Beal had been with UPS since 1990. Fanning had worked with the company since 2006.

   Federal officials have found no evidence of a pre-crash fire or engine failure aboard UPS Flight 1354, which went down early Wednesday.