University of Alabama

Mental health care in correctional facilities was the subject of a talk in Tuscaloosa yesterday.

Dr. Marisa Giggie, the chief psychiatrist for the Tuscaloosa County Jail, held the panel discussion alongside Tuscaloosa County Sheriff Ron Abernathy and Circuit Court Judge Bradley Almond. They talked through the challenges in caring for a growing number of mentally ill inmates in correctional facilities, and new ideas to try and keep those with mental illnesses out of jail in the first place.

Honda STEAM Connections Tour Visits UA

Apr 19, 2017
Allison Mollenkamp

The Honda STEAM Connections Tour raced to the University of Alabama today to expose local students to science and engineering. 

The Honda STEAM Connections Tour and the UA College of Engineering invited over three hundred middle and high school students tour engineering facilities and hear from engineering students and professionals.

The event is meant to inspire students to pursue careers in engineering. Many of these fields support motorsports.

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 A board is seeking an investigation into the election of a new University of Alabama student government president who won with the open backing of a secretive campus society.  

The student government's election board asked for the Office of Student Conduct to review Jared Hunter's election earlier this month.

Hunter won after publicly acknowledging he was backed by a campus group called The Machine which is controlled by historically white fraternities and sororities. Hunter was the first black candidate to gain the group's support.

Small-town boys dominate in Alabama Politics and the governor's office. The only city governor of Alabama in the last 66 years is Don Siegelman, who is from Mobile...

Some high school students in Tuscaloosa are meeting with their state representative later today to ask him to sponsor and introduce a new bill regarding pets in hot cars.

John Grisham
Katie Willem / APR

The University of Alabama’s School of Law was visited by perhaps the most recognizable writer of legal fiction last week.

Author John Grisham was the keynote speaker at a symposium late last week celebrating Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird and examining its impact on society and the legal system. Grisham says To Kill a Mockingbird is one of a long line of novels that were both massively commercially successful and managed to shift public opinion about an issue or injustice through that success.

UA Student Health Center
University of Alabama

Several students at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa have been diagnosed with the mumps, according to state health officials.

The Alabama Department of Public Health issued a news release Friday saying it's investigating those cases and working with the school to contact additional students and faculty members that may have been exposed to the disease.

New State AG Addresses Law Enforcement on Cyber Crimes in Tuscaloosa

Feb 22, 2017
Alex Aubuchon / APR

Law enforcement officers across the state are learning how to take the fight on crime online.

The Joint Electronic Crimes Task Force is hosting two eight-hour sessions at the University of Alabama’s campus. The free training is the first of its kind in West Alabama, and teaches officers about how to get warrants for electronic data, and how to handle digital forensics evidence.

 Auburn University is once again replacing its landmark oak trees at Toomer's Corner.

A university statement says workers will plant new trees on Saturday because of damage caused by a fire in September.  

The current trees were planted there after a University of Alabama fan poisoned the original Toomer's oaks.

Toomer's Corner is a traditional gathering for Auburn fans to celebrate football victories by rolling the trees with toilet paper. A German man pleaded guilty last month to setting fire to paper on one of the trees after a game.

Dance Marathon
University of Alabama

Students at the University of Alabama were dancing for children last weekend.

More than 200 students participated in the Alabama Dance Marathon on Saturday. The event is 12 hours of non-stop dancing meant to raise money for Children's of Alabama, a children’s hospital in Birmingham. Participants had to keep moving from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m., and weren’t allowed to sit.

Dr. Richard Streiffer
UA

The Affordable Care Act is seen as one of the defining pieces of President Obama’s legacy – and the new Republican majority has targeted it for repeal.

Leading lawmakers in both houses of Congress have begun work dismantling Obamacare – despite not having any plan in place for a replacement, and despite polling that suggests an overwhelming majority of Americans oppose its repeal without a replacement ready.

Dr. Richard Streiffer is the dean of the College of Community Health Sciences at the University of Alabama. He joins us to explain the current state of the health insurance marketplace in Alabama, what the Affordable Care Act has done for Alabama's citizens, and what it might mean for the state if the act is repealed.

Some of the best athletes in college football are in Mobile this week, gearing up for the annual Reese’s Senior Bowl.

The game is a chance for standout athletes to practice and play before a host of NFL scouts, before NFL teams draft their next class of players in April. A few of this year’s top prospects, including University of Alabama defenders Jonathan Allen and Reuben Foster, have opted to sit out this year’s Senior Bowl. But the roster still includes four Crimson Tide players, two players from Auburn, and one athlete from the University of South Alabama in Mobile.

UA ROTC
University of Alabama

Several future military officers at the University of Alabama will be headed to West Point after winning an ROTC competition over the weekend.

The UA cadets competed in what’s called the Brigade Ranger Challenge – a regional tournament for the winners of similar competitions in five Southeastern states and in Puerto Rico. Events included a fitness test, timed weapon assembly, land navigation, a 6.2 mile march and more – all while wearing about 40 pounds of gear. Alabama’s team won five of the seven events involved.

Women's March in Birmingham Tomorrow

Jan 20, 2017
Trump protestors
Spencer Platt / Getty

A new civil rights march will be taking place at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in downtown Birmingham this weekend.

Activists from across Alabama will join together at Kelly Ingram Park to march in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington this Saturday. There is also a group of Alabama women attending the national march in D.C. The marches are designed to be rallies for women across the country who want to “proactively preserve” their rights.

The man accused of attempting to rob the Alabama Credit Union and taking nearly a dozen people hostage in Tuscaloosa has been identified.

18 year old Cedrick Lamar Collins of Tuscaloosa was taken into custody roughly two hours after the standoff began. According to a University of Alabama news release, he’s been charged with first-degree robbery, but more charges are expected to follow.  

The University of Alabama has announced that police have a suspect in custody and all hostages appear to be OK after an active hostage situation at the main office of the Alabama Credit Union on Paul W. Bryant Drive in Tuscaloosa, near the UA Law School.

Police and the FBI responded to the situation.

Alabama Credit Union CEO Steve Swofford has announced that all Alabama Credit Union employees are safe.

UACCS puts on gift drive

Dec 15, 2016

As the holiday season rolls along, groups in Tuscaloosa are working to make things a little bit easier on veterans. The University of Alabama’s College of Continuing Studies is partnering with the Chamber of Commerce of West Alabama for a gift drive for the patients at the Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center.

Leroy Hurt is the associate dean for community engagement at the College of Continuing Studies. He says they’re taking typical household items on their visit…

The Beat Bama Food Drive is Auburn University’s counterpart to Alabama’s Beat Auburn Beat Hunger. The food drive collects money and food for the Food Bank of East Alabama.

The organizers of the food drive encourage all student organizations on the Auburn campus to get involved. Food donations are supplemented with money from benefit nights and a cornhole tournament.

Caroline Jager is the President of the Beat Bama Food Drive. She says the food drive is best summed up by its motto: “Educate, Unite, Serve.”

      

           Alabama was a popular destination for those seeking the presidency this year. Republicans and Democrats made it a point to visit the Yellowhammer State to try and keep it red or turn it blue. This of course means news coverage, which in turn, brings out cartoonists. If you follow sites like Al-dot-com you’ll see the work of one man in particular…

            “Never dreamed I’d get a job drawing editorial cartoons, political, I’m not really that political by nature, I just make fun of everything.”

Best Student Feature--"Alabama Students and Louisiana Flood Recovery" APR

Nov 3, 2016
Katie Willem

The Louisiana floods didn’t completely destroy Katherine’s Ray home. But it came close.  Students from the University of Alabama and Troy University are using hammers to tear down what’s left.

“I would say by the time we arrived on the scene, things had leveled off quite a bit.” 

Brandon Sinanan is one of them. He says it’s the resilience of the people that he’s encountered here that will stick with him…

Cuba Week at the University of Alabama

Oct 27, 2016

This week, the University of Alabama celebrates its third annual Cuba Week. APR student reporter Allison Mollenkamp has more…

UA’s Cuba Week offers an array of opportunities for the public to immerse themselves in Cuban history and culture. There will be presentations of artwork and performances with 25 Cubans from Havana, UA professors and student counterparts taking part.

Million Dollar Band
Pat Duggins

When it comes to Alabama’s Million Dollar Band, each week fans get a chance to see the music and marching come together at halftime. Here’s what you don’t see. Football fans take a break during the week after each game. Alabama’s marching band doesn’t.

Encyclopedia of Alabama

 The first black person to attend the University of Alabama, Autherine Lucy Foster, is among four people who are being honored as the newest members of the university's Alabama Educator Hall of Fame.

The group was honored at a ceremony Saturday night at NorthRiver Yacht Club in Tuscaloosa.  

Foster became the first black person to attend Alabama in 1956. Campus riots broke out and the university removed her. Foster's expulsion was reversed in 1988, and she graduated from Alabama with a master's degree in elementary education in 1992.

Prison Reform: Alabama's overcrowding problem

Oct 14, 2016

Alabama’s prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, as well as allegations of mismanagement and corruption have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the state’s prison system and what happens when they come out. Today, APR’s MacKenzie Bates hears from critics of Alabama’s prisons are run and how plans to fix things may just throw money at the problem…

"Renew our Rivers Black Warrior River" cleanup underway

Sep 28, 2016

The Black Warrior River in central Alabama could be looking a lot cleaner after today.

The first “Renew Our Rivers Black Warrior River” campaign kicked off today. Thirty two river cleanup events are planned this year and will continue throughout November on the Alabama, Black Warrior, Cahaba, Chattahoochee, Coosa, Mobile and Tallapoosa rivers.

SWIRLL
Alex AuBuchon / APR

All week long on Alabama Public Radio, we’ve been looking back at the tornado outbreak on April 27, 2011. The storms impacted homeowners and businesses, and you’ve heard from many of them during our coverage.

Now we’ll look ahead. For the past two months, dozens of scientists have been conducting groundbreaking research on tornadoes and severe weather right here in Alabama.

APR’s Alex AuBuchon has more on the impact that research could have on meteorologists' understanding of severe weather and forecasters’ ability to predict it.

Blossom: Renaissance Pig

Aug 6, 2016
Parker Branton

It's festival season in Alabama, and a common face you will see isn’t what you would expect. APR student reporter Parker Branton traveled around the state, and not for the music, or the corn dogs. Here is the saga of Blossom the Painting Pig...

Festival goers look over the masterpieces painted by what more than a few of her fans refer to as a modern day “pigcasso.” Scott and Jackie McQueen are the owners of this talented swine. After years of begging for a pig, Jackie got more than she bargained for.

“Our little pig’s name is Blossom.”

2011 Tornadoes: A Forecaster's nightmare

Aug 6, 2016

The April 2011 tornado outbreak caused widespread destruction, costing lives and billions of dollars in damage.  Local TV weathercasters helped spread the word on where tornadoes were and where they’re going. But what happens when the weatherman becomes a victim of the severe weather while he’s on the air? APR’s MacKenzie Bates has the story of one forecaster where on April 27th, 2011, the saying the story hits close to home takes on a whole new meaning.

Ask anyone in the TV news business, and they’ll tell you people tune in mostly for the weather.

Fairfield's fiscal future

Aug 6, 2016

It's been more than four months since the Wal-Mart store in Fairfield closed its doors, leaving many people to find goods and services elsewhere. City Leaders are scrambling to not only plug holes in the city's budget but create more economic opportunities to people that have lost their jobs.  APR’s MacKenzie Bates traveled to Fairfield to find out what’s next…

It’s a quiet morning on Gary Avenue in downtown Fairfield.  The Magic City Grille is open for breakfast and Beauty Land Cosmetics is opening its doors for business. 

What's next for Mike Hubbard?

Aug 4, 2016
MacKenzie Bates/APR

The former Alabama House Speaker was convicted on more than half of the 23 felony ethics charges against him on Friday in a Lee County courtroom.  He has no job, no title, and will be sentenced next month.  APR’s MacKenzie Bates was there during the tense hours between final arguments and the verdict…

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