A Selma-based auto supplier is continuing its lawsuit against a former employee they fired, after a Montgomery County judge ruled whistleblower protections don’t apply.

Planned Parenthood
Getty Images

Planned Parenthood is taking the state of Alabama to court after Governor Robert Bentley halted Medicaid payments to the organization's clinics in Alabama.

A federal judge will hold a hearing later this morning on Planned Parenthood Southeast's request for a preliminary injunction. Last month, Governor Bentley announced that he planned to terminate agreements allowing Planned Parenthood to be paid for providing services to Medicaid patients.

Oasis Tabernacle Church
Alaina Denean Deshazo / Selma Times-Journal / AP

Selma police have arrested a man after three people were shot in Selma’s Oasis Tabernacle Church yesterday.

26 year old James Junior Minter is being held without bond in the Dallas County Jail. He’s accused of shooting his former girlfriend, their 1-month-old son, and the church pastor during services yesterday. Authorities believe Minter was most likely upset about a recent breakup and visitation issues with his son.

The 24-year-old woman and her 1-month-old baby were both rushed to Birmingham for medical treatment. Both are currently in stable condition.

A variety of memorial and remembrance events are being held this weekend for the late voting rights activist Amelia Boynton-Robinson.

Boynton-Robinson laid in state at Selma's Tabernacle Baptist Church this morning, followed by a four-hour memorial service. Tomorrow, she will lie in state until noon at the chapel of Tuskegee University. A memorial program will be held from noon until 3 PM Sunday at the university chapel.

It’s been almost one week since the Legislature ended a special session without a general fund budget.

Governor Robert Bentley is expected to call another special session to deal with a projected $200 million shortfall in the state’s coffers.

As both chambers remain divided on the issue, the house did vote in favor of cutting $156 million from Medicaid before passing their version of the budget.

Huntsville Republican Representative Phil Williams says he was ashamed of that vote, but he believes the move sent a message throughout Montgomery.

Last night, the Alabama House of Representatives approved a dramatic cut to Medicaid as lawmakers try to balance the General Fund budget.

Legislators in the House approved the $156 million dollar Medicaid cut on a second vote yesterday. The first vote failed.

Immediately afterward, the House passed its version of a General Fund budget. Funding for public health, prisons, mental health, human resources and the state’s courts would be unchanged. All other state agencies would see a 5.5% reduction in their operating budgets.


Governor Robert Bentley is calling a special session next week on the general fund budget.

The governor says that he will call lawmakers back to Montgomery on July 13.

The 2015 regular session ended in a stalemate after lawmakers could not agree on tax increases. Bentley vetoed a spending plan that would have cut $200 million from state agencies.

Activists are planning protests at what they say is an unlicensed abortion clinic in Selma.

Abortion opponents say they'll hold a rally Friday and march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge Saturday in a demonstration against the Central Alabama Women's Clinic. Organizers say they have evidence that the medical office performs more than nine abortions monthly. That would require it to come under state regulation as an abortion clinic.

Stan Ingold

There are only two and a half weeks left in the current Supreme Court session, and Alabamians are still waiting on a definitive answer regarding same-sex marriage.

Gay marriage is currently legal in Alabama, but a state Supreme Court ruling has ordered all county probate judges not to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. U.S. District Judge Callie Granade passed a ruling that would force those probate judges to begin issuing licenses, but that won’t go into effect until after the Supreme Court rules.

A judge recently stopped another effort from Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard’s defense to have his ethics case dismissed.

Lee County Judge Jacob Walker III granted a state motion to kill subpoenas against Governor Robert Bentley and the custodian of records for the Alabama Ethics Commission.

Hubbard’s lawyers say those subpoenas were necessary to learn about possible communication records from Governor Bentley regarding Attorney General Luther Strange recusing himself from the case and appointing chief prosecutor Van Davis.

Selma-based Hyundai supplier Lear Corporation is disputing allegations that it fired a whistleblower in a federal safety investigation.

Lear said on Friday that allegations of employees being exposed to the hazardous chemical TDI are false. The company says the air in the plant has been tested by multiple independent parties.

However, NBC recently reported that a Yale University medical clinic tested blood samples from nearly twenty workers, and five showed exposure to the chemical.

A federal judge has issued a temporary restraining order against a company accused of retaliating against whistleblowing workers in Selma.

Workers in a Selma automotive parts plant have complained about conditions in the plant and were involved in a federal investigation.

An order filed by the U.S. Department of Labor Wednesday in U.S. District Court Wednesday blocks the Lear Corporation and Renosol Seating from terminating, suspending, suing, threatening or retaliating against current or former employees.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley's cornerstone economic development bill is headed to a conference committee.

House members want more time to review Senate changes to legislation that would change the way Alabama recruits companies to the state.

The Senate added multiple amendments before passing the bill on Tuesday. One of those added an $850 million cap on annual incentives.

  The daughters of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior and Governor George Wallace will meet with Governor Robert Bentley today. It’s all part of a ceremony to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery voting rights march.    It was on this date in 1965 that Dr. King led the procession to Alabama’s State Capitol. APR spoke with Bernice** King during the remembrance of “bloody Sunday” in Selma.

She says voting rights are being challenged in the U.S. and the fight has to go on.

“At that time, we’d been singing songs, we shall overcome, and before I’d be a slave…be dead and buried in my grave,” says Bennie Lee Tucker. He’s seventy four years old, and he spent the last fifty five of those years here in Selma. “And we gonna let nobody turn us around, no more Governor Wallace…no more white folk,” he says.

On the front porch of his home on Eugene Avenue, Tucker recalls March 7th, 1965. It was the height of the voting rights movement. Dr. Martin Luther King, Junior wasn’t the name on everyone’s mind that day.

A group retracing the steps of the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery Voting Rights March made it to the Alabama state Capitol.

Martin Luther King III on stood near the place his father addressed marchers 50 years ago and called for fewer restrictions in voting.

Governor Bentley addressed the crowd, but was met with some boos and chants of "Medicaid now," calling for expansion of the health care program. Bentley was also booed by some in the crowd at the 50th anniversary commemoration event in Selma last Saturday.

Even though it is Monday today marks the 50th anniversary of Turnaround Tuesday. On this day fifty years ago Martin Luther King Junior led marchers halfway across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.           

The City of Selma remembered the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” over the weekend. But today marks another milestone in the civil rights movement.

Saturday was the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” in 1965. Today marks 50 years since the second march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge called Turnaround Tuesday. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., led that protest himself, but turned back before state troopers could attack like they did just two days prior.

Selma city councilman Benny Lee Tucker was a teenager in 1965. He says he had a specific job during King’s march…

Vice President Joe Biden says the same human rights that African Americans fought for in Selma, Alabama, are at stake for gay rights activists today.

Biden is drawing parallels between the civil rights and gay rights movements in a speech to the Human Rights Campaign, a gay rights group.

He says Selma and Stonewall were "basically the same movement." He's referring to 1969 Stonewall Inn riots that marked the symbolic start of the modern gay rights movement.

Mohammed Fairouz
Samantha West

This weekend, tens of thousands of people will make their way Selma to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday.

This means a lot a work for city workers to prepare for the crowds. James Benderson is the director of city planning and development for Selma. He says they have a lot of help.

“We have state police agencies, a lot of the local police municipalities within the area will be helping out. We have the national parks service helping out, so it’s a collaborative effort between a lot of different agencies making it work out for everybody.”

Stan Ingold

This weekend, the city of Selma will remember the fiftieth anniversary of the event known as Bloody Sunday. State troopers attacked voting rights marchers with clubs and tear gas in 1965. The Edmund Pettus Bridge, where the bloodshed took place, has become a monument to the civil rights movement. For one Atlanta couple, the bridge is a symbol of something else, and that’s raising some eyebrows in Selma.

The Alabama Supreme Court has upheld a state program that gives tax credits to help families pay for private school.

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that the law does not violate restrictions on giving funds to private, religious schools because the money goes to parents.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says in a news release this afternoon “The Supreme Court’s ruling makes it crystal clear that Alabama parents have the right to school choice in seeking the best education for their children.”

Bringing new industry into your state is often an expensive undertaking, full of tax breaks and other financial incentives. But as APR’s Alex AuBuchon reports, Alabama may start looking for results before handing over any cash...

     Governor Bentley is looking at changing how the state of Alabama tries to lure new business and industry to the area.That’s what he told an audience today at the Economic Development Association convention in Montgomery.

 State troopers investigated more traffic fatalities during the recent Christmas and New Year's holiday period than they did a year ago. Alabama Public Radio’s Pat Duggins explains…

The companies behind the movie "Selma" say principal photography has begun and the movie is being shot in Atlanta and in Selma and Montgomery in Alabama.

"Selma" is the story of Martin Luther King Jr.'s voting rights struggle that culminated with the march from Selma to Montgomery and enactment of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The chairman and CEO of Paramount Pictures, Brad Grey, says the story will resonate with those involved in the voting rights struggle with King and with those who continue to fight against discrimination in voting.

The City of Selma observed the 49th anniversary of Bloody Sunday over the weekend. It was on March 7, 1965 when state and local lawmen attacked protesters on the Edmund Pettus bridge.  The demonstrators were marching for voting rights. Four days of events concluded yesterday in Selma that drew civil rights leaders from across the country.  One was the Reverend William Barber.   He's head of North Carolina’s NAACP. Barber says he looks at the event as not only a remembrance but a call to action.  He says there's been progress, but we have a long way to go.

State Superintendent of Education Tommy Bice says a new leadership team should be in place at the Selma schools by the last week of February. Bice says state education officials are assembling the team because the state Board of Education voted unanimously to take over the Selma city school system. The takeover follows the arrest of a Selma High School teacher on charges of inappropriate sexual conduct with a student and an investigation by the state Department of Education.

Stan Ingold

       There are many reasons people visit Alabama, to see sporting events, the space connection in Huntsville or the beaches along the gulf coast. However, civil rights tourism is often overlooked by the masses. This dark time in the state’s history is drawing visitors from all over.

Visitors like Betty and Phil Histon from Corvallis Oregon. They’re in Alabama, like many tourists, to try the local barbecue and the see the sites. When we met them they were in the Civil Rights Interpretive Center is Selma…

More than 60 people have marched from the historic Edmund Pettus Bridge to Selma City Hall to protest a monument to a Civil War general being rebuilt in a Selma cemetery. The biracial group carried signs Tuesday and chanted, "No justice, no peace." Their leader, activist Rose Toure, said Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest was an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan. The marchers went to City Hall to ask the City Council to deny permission to rebuild the monument. A similar monument disappeared from the cemetery earlier this year.

Flooding Causes Damage In West, South Alabama

Sep 4, 2012

Flooding caused by remnants of Hurricane Isaac has caused extensive damage in parts of western and southern Alabama.

Swirling water lapped at the doors of businesses in downtown Selma. At least 20 cars filled with quick-rising water at an automotive dealership before workers could move them.

In Gordo, about two dozen houses were flooded, two bridges were washed out and several families had to be rescued in the town of 1,750 people.

And a commissary that provides food for thousands of elderly people in western Alabama filled with about a foot of water in Brent.