Science & Health

The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Study Reveals What Happens During A 'Glacial Earthquake'

One of the 20 GPS sensors deployed on Greenland's Helheim Glacier to track its movement.
Alistair Everett/Swansea University

Originally published on Fri June 26, 2015 6:35 am

When giant icebergs break off of huge, fast-moving glaciers, they essentially push back on those rivers of ice and temporarily reverse the flow.

That's according to a new study of "glacial earthquakes," an unusual kind of temblor discovered just over a decade ago.

Read more
Science
2:12 pm
Thu June 25, 2015

Make Lava, Not War

The Two-Way
9:33 am
Thu June 25, 2015

'Stealthy' Giant Rhea Eludes Police In U.K.

The female partner of the missing rhea bird that has been on the loose from a private collection in Carlton-in-Lindrick near Worksop, Nottinghamshire, U.K.
Joe Giddens PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 12:45 pm

The giant ostrich-like rhea, despite its largely useless vestigial wings, seems to be something of a flight risk.

Last year, we brought you the story of one of the birds — native to South America — that escaped from a farm in the U.K., startling cyclists and otherwise wreaking mayhem in the English countryside.

Read more
The Salt
5:04 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

Dynamic Duos: How To Get More Nutrition By Pairing Foods

Eating eggs with your salad helps boost absorption of carotenoids — the pigments in tomatoes and carrots.
Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 3:00 pm

What are the makings of a great salad? You need fresh greens, of course, and then a layer of colorful vegetables like tomatoes and carrots.

That's a good start. But to help the body absorb more of the nutrients packed into this medley, you may want to add something else: a cooked egg.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:13 pm
Wed June 24, 2015

How The Turtle Got Its Shell

An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long.
Rainer Schoch/Nature

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 7:01 pm

The fossilized remains of a bizarre-looking reptile are giving scientists new insights into how turtles got their distinctive shells.

Some 240 million years ago, this early turtle-like creature lived in a large lake, in a fairly warm, subtropical climate. But it didn't have the kind of shell modern turtles have, says Hans-Dieter Sues, a curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

Read more
The Salt
11:14 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Survival Of The Greenest Beer? Breweries Adapt To A Changing Climate

The Smuttynose Towle Farm brewery in Hampton, N.H., has an invisible but tight envelope that keeps the interior temperature consistently cool or warm, prevents energy loss and ultimately saves money.
Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 10:35 am

When you hear the words "green brewery," you might picture gleaming solar panels or aerodynamic wind turbines. But the most valuable piece of technology at the $24 million headquarters of Smuttynose Brewing Co. on the seacoast of New Hampshire isn't quite as sexy.

"The place you have to start is the building envelope," says Smuttynose founder Peter Egelston.

Read more
The Salt
11:09 am
Wed June 24, 2015

Genetically Modified Salmon: Coming To A River Near You?

AquaBounty's salmon (background) has been genetically modified to grow bigger and faster than a conventional Atlantic salmon of the same age (foreground.)
Courtesy of AquaBounty Technologies, Inc.

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 3:25 pm

While the debate over whether to label foods containing GMO ingredients plays out across the country, another engineered food has long been waiting to hit grocery stores: genetically modified salmon.

Read more
Shots - Health News
7:54 am
Wed June 24, 2015

That's Not Fair! Crime And Punishment In A Preschooler's Mind

By age 3, kids already have a burgeoning sense of empathy, ownership and justice.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 9:59 am

Toddlers can throw their fair share of tantrums, especially when you don't yield to their will. But by age 3, it turns out, the little rug rats actually have a burgeoning sense of fairness and are inclined to right a wrong.

When they see someone being mistreated, children as young as 3 years old will intervene on behalf of others nearly as often as for themselves, a study published this month in Current Biology suggests. Just don't ask them to punish the perpetrator.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Tue June 23, 2015

NASA Flummoxed By Dwarf Planet's Bright Spots, 'Pyramid-Shaped Peak'

A "cluster of mysterious bright spots" can be seen on the dwarf planet Ceres, NASA says. The image was taken by the Dawn spacecraft, in orbit of Ceres.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

New images of Ceres are the clearest ever taken, but NASA's scientists still haven't figured out the enigmatic dwarf planet. The agency's latest photos of Ceres show multiple bright spots — and a "pyramid-shaped peak towering over a relatively flat landscape."

That's according to an update posted by the space agency, saying that Ceres and its bright spots "continue to mystify."

Read more
U.S.
4:02 am
Tue June 23, 2015

How Fracking Is Fueling A Power Shift From Coal To Gas

Bill Pentak of Panda Power Funds (left), Plant Manager John Martin (center) and Construction Manager Rob Risher (right) stand in front of the construction site for the new Panda Liberty gas power plant in Towanda, Penn. The plant, expected to come online in early 2016, was deliberately sited on top of the Marcellus Shale to take advantage of the cheap, abundant gas.
Marie Cusick WITF

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 7:10 am

When you flip on a light switch, odds are, you're burning coal. But as the fracking boom continues to unleash huge quantities of natural gas, the nation's electric grid is changing. Power plants are increasingly turning to this low-cost, cleaner-burning fossil fuel.

Bill Pentak stands in the middle of a construction site, looking up at his company's latest project towering overhead — a new natural gas power plant.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:02 am
Tue June 23, 2015

Take A Hike To Do Your Heart And Spirit Good

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 2:33 pm

Fryman Canyon is one of those special places in the city of Los Angeles — a bit of country and canyon nestled just off the crest of Mulholland Drive, with gorgeous views of the valley and mountains.

It's favored by the canine set — my two dogs love it here — and on any given morning I'm sure to run into fellow canyon lovers, like Stacy Maes and her energetic weimaraner, Astrid.

Read more
Environment
4:52 pm
Mon June 22, 2015

EPA Official: Decisions On Climate Change Will Affect Economic Future Of U.S.

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 9:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Goats and Soda
3:20 pm
Mon June 22, 2015

Will A Surgical Mask Keep You Safe In A Viral Outbreak?

The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome is slowing down in South Korea, but people were still wearing surgical masks around Seoul on Monday.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 22, 2015 4:05 pm

An outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome in South Korea has sent sales of surgical masks soaring.

When the deadly virus first appeared in the country in May, people started wearing masks just about everywhere — on the metro, at crowded malls and even at weddings — despite the fact that the virus doesn't spread easily outside of hospitals and clinics.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Sun June 21, 2015

'Speed,' Galápagos Tortoise Who Came To San Diego In 1933, Dies At 150

This undated photo from the San Diego Zoo shows Speed, a Galapagos tortoise that has been at the zoo since 1933. The zoo reported Friday that Speed had been euthanized at an estimated age of more than 150 years.
AP

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 5:46 pm

A rare Galápagos tortoise, known affectionately as "Speed," has died at the San Diego Zoo — his home of more than eight decades. He was (approximately) 150.

Read more
Parallels
8:43 am
Sun June 21, 2015

Israel Bets On Recycled Water To Meet Its Growing Thirst

Farmer Efi Cohen inspects almond trees on a kibbutz south of Jerusalem. The Israeli government says it's safe to use treated sewage water to irrigate tree fruit, but not all crops.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun June 21, 2015 9:20 pm

Recycling sewage water has helped free Israel, a desert country, from depending on rain.

Treated sewage water provides close to a quarter of Israel's demand for water, right behind desalination, the other major process that has eased Israel's fear of drought.

But making that water — from toilets, showers, and factories — clean enough to use is challenging.

Read more

Pages