Science & Health

The Salt
1:19 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Students Win Seed Money To Make Flour From Insects

MBA students from McGill University in Montreal are building a company to mass produce grasshoppers, seen here at a market in Oaxaca, Mexico.
William Neuheisel Flickr

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:55 pm

Mohammed Ashour has a big order to fill: By March 2014, he has to deliver 10 tons of grasshoppers to customers in Mexico.

He and four other MBA students at McGill University in Montreal have a plan to farm insects in poor countries and turn them into flour that can be used in everything from bread to corn tortillas. And on Monday, former President Bill Clinton handed them $1 million to make it happen.

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Freighter Makes First-Of-Its-Kind Transit Of Northwest Passage

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:17 pm

A Danish shipping company announced Friday the first-ever voyage of a large commercial freighter through the Northwest Passage — a journey made possible by the disappearance of Arctic ice due to global warming.

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Music
11:46 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Les Paul: Inventor and Innovator

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow, broadcasting today from Madison, Wisconsin, with a question for our audience, Wisconsinites, Wisconsinians(ph), whatever you prefer.

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Food
11:23 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Food Fermentation: The Science of Sausage and Cheese

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. We're here at the Wisconsin Science Festival at the Institute for Discovery in Madison and talking about a trip to America's dairy land, of course. Inevitably you're going to talk about food and fermentation. In the form of Wisconsin, it's famous for fermentation, one of the oldest ways of preserving food. It's also a way to get really unique flavors.

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Research News
11:19 am
Fri September 27, 2013

World's Largest Neutrino Telescope Buried in Antarctic Ice

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. We're broadcasting from the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery in Madison, home this week of the Wisconsin Science Festival. Astronomers and astrophysicists have traditionally, for centuries, looked upwards to the sky to learn more about the universe. We've launched telescopes into space. We have sent probes beyond our solar system to study dark matter, colliding galaxies, how the planets formed.

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Environment
11:15 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Saving Wild Places in the 'Anthropocene'

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

We've been talking about the Stone Age but now we're living in what some scientists are calling the anthropocene. Maybe you've never heard of that word. It's a time where everything on the planet is touched by humans in some way, whether it's directly, like clear cutting forests or suppressing fires, or indirectly by the effects of climate change. Is this, as the environmentalist Bill McKibben wrote, oh, 20 years ago, is this the end of nature?

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Humans
11:11 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Modern Humans Still Evolving, and Faster Than Ever

For those who think the forces of natural selection no longer apply to modern humans, paleoanthropologist John Hawks would urge you to reconsider. In recent times — that's 10 to 20 thousand years, for a paleoanthropologist — Hawks says we've picked up genetic variations in skin color, and other traits that allow us to break down starch and digest cheese.

TED Radio Hour
8:48 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Everything Is Connected

Every species has its own important role in maintaining nature's balance.
Thomas Barwick Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 9:32 am

  • Listen to the Episode

"The more humble we are in the face of our experience with the natural world ... the more we're going to find a healthy coexistence with it." — Bernie Krause, bioacoustician

Every species plays a crucial role in our natural world. But when humans tinker with the equation, a chain reaction can cause entire ecosystems to break down. In this hour, TED speakers explain how everything is connected in nature, with some bold ideas about how we can restore the delicate balance and bring disappearing ecosystems back.

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TED Radio Hour
8:45 am
Fri September 27, 2013

What Listening To Nature Teaches Us About Changing Habitats

"In habitats that are pretty much untouched, the sound is organized and structured in such a way so that each critter establishes its own bandwidth" — Bernie Kraus
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:25 pm

Part 3 in the TED Radio Hour episode "Everything Is Connected."

About Bernie Krause's TEDTalk

Bernie Krause has been recording the wild — the wind in the trees, the chirping of birds — for 45 years. He has seen many environments radically altered by humans, sometimes even by practices thought to be environmentally safe.

About Bernie Krause

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TED Radio Hour
8:45 am
Fri September 27, 2013

What Lessons Came Out Of Biosphere 2?

Aerial view of Biosphere 2, where Jane Poynter lived for two years and 20 minutes.
Courtesy of Jane Poynter

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 12:50 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode "Everything Is Connected."

About Jane Poynter's TEDTalk

Sustainability consultant Jane Poynter tells her story of living two years and 20 minutes in Biosphere 2, a hermetically sealed environment in Arizona. The experience provoked her to explore how we might sustain life in the harshest of conditions.

About Jane Poynter

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TED Radio Hour
8:45 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Why Are Bees Disappearing?

"Bees are vital to the pollination and production of our fruits and vegetables ... unfortunately, they're all in trouble" — Marla Spivak
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:25 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode "Everything Is Connected."

About Marla Spivak's TEDTalk

Honeybees have thrived for 50 million years. So why have certain colonies started dying in droves in recent decades? Researcher Marla Spivak reveals four reasons with tragic consequences.

About Marla Spivak

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TED Radio Hour
8:45 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Can 'Rewilding' Restore Vanishing Ecosystems?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 8:25 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode "Everything Is Connected."

About George Monbiot's TEDTalk

Wolves were native to the Yellowstone National Park until hunting wiped them out. In 1995, when the wolves began to come back, something interesting happened: The rest of the park began to find a new, more healthful balance.

About George Monbiot

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Monkey See
6:49 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Point Of View: How So Many Rooted For 'Breaking Bad's' Walter White

How could you not feel sorry for this guy? Vince Gilligan even admitted that he loaded up the Breaking Bad pilot with "reasons to give a damn about" Walter White.
Doug Hyun Courtesy of AMC

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:13 am

If you were still cheering for Walter White at the start of the sixth season (or, as AMC contracts call it, the second half of the fifth season), a mustard stain on a doctor's jacket might be one reason why.

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Research News
2:06 am
Fri September 27, 2013

How Recycling Bias Affects What You Toss Where

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:07 am

During an experiment, marketing professor Remi Trudel noticed a pattern in what his volunteers were recycling versus throwing in the garbage. He then went through his colleagues' trash and recycling bins at Boston University for more data.

He found the same pattern, says NPR's Shankar Vedantam: "Whole sheets of paper typically went in the recycling, but paper fragments went in the trash."

Same type of paper, different shapes, different bins.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Scientists Find Sea Louse Has Tidal 'Body Clock'

The speckled sea louse.
Wikipedia Commons

One thing you can say about the diminutive speckled sea louse: it's always on time.

Scientists studying the tiny crustacean, a marine cousin of the wood-louse, found that it runs not one, but two internal clocks. Not only does the creature have a circadian rhythm, or so called "body clock" like most land-dwelling animals, including humans, but it also has a circatidal clock that follows the 12.4-hour cycle of the tide.

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