Science & Health

Space
4:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Hello Earth! Can You Hear Me?'

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 4:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Read more
Science
4:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

In Massachusetts Lab, Scientists Grow An Artificial Rat Limb

In the study, muscle cells were injected into the cell-free "scaffolding" of a rat limb, which provided shape and structure onto which regenerated tissue could grow.
Bernhard Jank, MD Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 6:00 am

A team of scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston made news earlier this month when they published research in the journal Biomaterials describing how they'd created the world's first bioartificial limb in the laboratory.

Or, in other words: scientists have now grown the entire forelimb of a rat in a lab.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:35 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Comet Lander Wakes Up, Calls Home, After Long Sleep

The Philae lander beamed back images showing one of its three feet on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This photo is compiled from two images.
ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 4:44 am

Last November, the European Space Agency wasn't sure if it would ever hear from its Philae lander again after the probe's unfortunate landing spot on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko left it in the shadow of a cliff, starving its solar panels of the faint sunlight needed to produce power.

Read more
Goats and Soda
8:03 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Science Fair Winner Designs Device To Cut Virus Spread On Planes

Raymond Wang, 17, of Vancouver, celebrates winning first place at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh, May 15.
Courtesy of Kathy Wolfe/Intel

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 8:40 am

When 17-year-old Raymond Wang saw the Ebola outbreak on the news last year, it got him thinking about viruses and how they spread around the world, especially on airplanes.

Read more
Science
6:48 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Female Scientists Unleash Comedic Revenge At #Distractinglysexy

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 10:02 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:51 am
Sat June 13, 2015

Science Of Sadness And Joy: 'Inside Out' Gets Childhood Emotions Right

Joy (left, voiced by Amy Poehler) and Sadness (voiced by Phyllis Smith) catch a ride on the Train of Thought in Pixar's Inside Out. The movie opens in theaters nationwide June 19.
Disney/Pixar

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:26 pm

Hollywood's version of science often asks us to believe that dinosaurs can be cloned from ancient DNA (they can't), or that the next ice age could develop in just a few days (it couldn't).

But Pixar's film Inside Out is an animated fantasy that remains remarkably true to what scientists have learned about the mind, emotion and memory.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:38 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

What Babies Understand About Adult Sadness

By the time they're 18 months old, kids know when you're sad, even if you're not bawling.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 10:54 pm

Babies tend to wear their hearts on their tiny little sleeves. They cry because you took away that thing they picked up off the floor and then put in their mouths. They cry because they're tired. Sometimes, they cry just because.

Read more
The Salt
4:20 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

Mighty Farming Microbes: Companies Harness Bacteria To Give Crops A Boost

Pam Marrone (right), founder and CEO of Marrone Bio Innovations, inspects some colonies of microbes. Marrone has spent most of her professional life prospecting for microbial pesticides and bringing them to market.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 7:55 pm

What if farmers, instead of picking up some agricultural chemicals at their local dealer, picked up a load of agricultural microbes instead?

It's something to contemplate, because some big names in the pesticide business — like Bayer and Monsanto — are putting money behind attempts to turn soil microbes into tools that farmers can use to give their crops a boost.

It's a symptom of the soaring interest in the ways microbes affect all of life. In our bodies, they help fight off disease. In the soil, they help deliver nutrients to plants, and perhaps much more.

Read more
Sports
4:20 pm
Fri June 12, 2015

NASCAR Goes Green: Gas-Guzzling Sport Works To Reduce Carbon Footprint

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 7:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:15 am
Fri June 12, 2015

Jack King, NASA's 'Voice Of Apollo,' Dies At 84

A Nov. 14, 1969, photo made available by NASA shows Jack King in the Firing Room of the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Control Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., during the countdown for Apollo 12. King, who died Thursday, became known as NASA's "Voice of Apollo."
AP

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 12:17 pm

Jack King, who uttered the countdown heard 'round the world followed by the historic words "Liftoff on Apollo 11!" has died at age 84.

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 am
Fri June 12, 2015

Scientists Investigate What Makes Us Itch

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 11:23 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Scientists have just scratched the surface of another important problem - why some things make us itch. Today, there's progress to report. Researchers in California have found a molecule that may be crucial for our brains to sense itch. NPR's Joe Palca has more.

Read more
The Salt
4:01 am
Fri June 12, 2015

Organic Farmers Call Foul On Whole Foods' Produce Rating System

Whole Foods says its new rating system is a way to talk to farmers and customers about issues that the organic rules don't encompass, like water, energy, labor and waste.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 2:20 pm

Nobody really likes to be graded. Especially when you don't get an A.

Some organic farmers are protesting a new grading system for produce and flowers that's coming into force at Whole Foods. They say it devalues the organic label and could become an "existential threat."

Read more
Goats and Soda
6:23 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

How Little Red Dots Could Help Women And Babies Stay Healthy

This bindi is coated with 100 percent of the daily recommended allowance for iodine.
Courtesy of Grey Group

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 11:08 am

In the rural pockets of India, a lifesaving device may be hidden in plain sight.

Across the country, it's not uncommon to see women sporting a small dot on their foreheads between their eyebrows. The mark is known as a bindi. And it's a Hindu tradition that dates to the third and fourth centuries.

The bindi is traditionally worn by women for religious purposes or to indicate that they're married. But today the bindi has also become popular among women of all ages, as a beauty mark. And it comes in all colors, shapes and sizes.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Should Tanning Bed Warnings Take A Cue From Graphic Cigarette Labels?

The FDA requires tanning machines to bear a label explaining the risks, but the messages are not particularly attention-grabbing.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 11:13 pm

Young white women like indoor tanning a lot.

Nearly a quarter of them hit a tanning bed in the past year. (The beds are even found on many college campuses.)

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:25 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough

Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri June 12, 2015 1:17 pm

Most American children and teenagers aren't drinking enough fluids, and that's leaving them mildly dehydrated, according to a new study. In fact, one-quarter of a broad cross-section of children ages 6 to 19 apparently don't drink any water as part of their fluid intake.

The Harvard scientists who turned up the finding were initially looking into the consumption of sugary drinks in schools and looking for ways to steer children toward water instead — a much healthier beverage.

Read more

Pages