Science & Health

TED Radio Hour
8:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Can Limited Resources Lead To Better Innovation?

"When you put a limitation on resources, you remove the limitation on creativity because necessity is the mother of invention."--Navi Radjou
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 11:59 am

Part 5 of TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Navi Radjou's TED Talk

Navi Radjou has spent years studying "jugaad," also known as frugal innovation. While researching emerging markets, he realized that creativity might be the most precious renewable resource.

About Navi Radjou

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TED Radio Hour
8:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Will Our Demand For Food Threaten Our Supply of Water?

"We've under-priced water, we've over-exploited it, we don't regulate how people pump groundwater out of the ground.... we just use too much."--Jonathan Foley
Courtesy of TEDxTC

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Jon Foley's TED Talk

Ecologist Jon Foley says agriculture is the "most powerful force unleashed on this planet since the end of the ice age." He says we're using too much of it to irrigate, and we have to rethink how we farm.

About Jon Foley

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TED Radio Hour
8:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

How Did A Medical Miracle Turn Into A Global Threat?

"What has happened in the last ten years, has been a remarkable increase in actual number of people who are dying or are not able to get better because they carry a resistant infection."--Ramanan Laxminarayan
Courtesy of TEDMED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Ramanan Laxminarayan's TED Talk

Antibiotics save lives, but we rely on them too much. Eventually, the drugs may stop working. Economist Ramanan Laxminarayan asks us to think twice before reaching for this double-edged resource.

About Ramanan Laxminarayan

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TED Radio Hour
8:30 am
Fri July 17, 2015

What's Disappearing From the Amazon — Even Faster Than Wildlife?

"There's a saying in Suriname that I dearly love: 'The rainforests hold answers to questions we have yet to ask.' But as you all know, it's rapidly disappearing."--Mark Plotkin
Ryan Lash TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Finite.

About Mark Plotkin's TED Talk

The isolated tribes of the Amazon are getting dispersed or dying out. Ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin describes what we'll lose if their culture and collective wisdom vanish with them.

About Mark Plotkin

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Movie Interviews
4:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Little Hero, Big Screen: The Entomology Of 'Ant-Man'

Visual effects supervisor Jake Morrison wanted Ant-Man's titular insects to be both accurate and relatable.
Marvel

Originally published on Sun July 19, 2015 10:56 pm

If superheroes are one of the ultimate expressions of individualism, what are we to make of Ant-Man, a Marvel Comics character based on one of the least individual, most collective creatures on the planet?

Ant-Man can shrink to the size of an ant — and, in the movie which opens this weekend, ants are his greatest allies. "The ants are loyal, brave and will be your partners on this job," explains the scientist who invented Ant-Man's supersuit.

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Science
4:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years.
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 9:14 am

For the past quarter-century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been gathering data from more than 400 scientists around the world on climate trends.

The report on 2014 from these international researchers? On average, it was the hottest year ever — in the ocean, as well as on land.

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Shots - Health News
4:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong.
Marko Korosec Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 9:19 am

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

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History
4:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Seven Decades Ago, A New, Enormous Kind Of Explosion

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 6:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Space
4:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

On The Cold, Dead Fringes Of The Solar System, Pluto Looks Shockingly Lively

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 11:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Children's Health
4:38 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 11:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
4:26 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

How Air Pollution May Have Caused Catastrophic Flooding In China

On July 9, 2013, heavy floodwaters swept through Beichuan in southwest China's Sichuan province.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 5:45 am

Air pollution isn't just bad for your health. It can have dramatic effects on weather and climate. In fact, a team of scientists believes that air pollution from industries and traffic could have caused the extreme floods that devastated southwest China in 2013.

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Shots - Health News
11:27 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Webcast: Sports And Health In America

Pamela Moore/iStockphoto/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 2:05 pm

The vast majority of kids in America play sports.

But while about three-quarters of adults played sports when they were younger, only 1 in 4 still plays sports today. Among them, men are more than twice as likely as women to play.

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Shots - Health News
11:04 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Screaming For Science: The Secrets Of Crying Babies And Car Alarms

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:08 pm

It's almost impossible to ignore a screaming baby. (Click here if you doubt that.) And now scientists think they know why.

"Screams occupy their own little patch of the soundscape that doesn't seem to be used for other things," says David Poeppel, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at New York University and director of the Department of Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute in Frankfurt.

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The Two-Way
4:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover.
Michael Scates AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 10:03 am

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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Shots - Health News
4:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Why We Play Sports: Winning Motivates, But Can Backfire, Too

Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:08 pm

Playing sports has always been important to 31-year-old Erik Johanson, a city planner in Philadelphia. Johanson thrived in baseball and ice hockey as a kid, he says — "one of the best players on the team in high school."

Today, Johanson is married and expecting his first child but is still passionate about ice hockey — and about winning. He plays on a highly competitive team of guys who got together after college and still play weekly in an adult league; they hope to take the crown this year.

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