Science & Health

The Salt
6:03 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Can Breeders Cure What Ails Our Breast-Heavy Turkeys?

A 40-pound tom turkey flaps his wing as Chris Conley carries him to a pen at Raymond's Turkey Farm in Methuen, Mass., on Friday. The farm raises approximately 20,000 broad-breasted white turkeys per year.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 10:19 am

Many Americans will be sitting down Thursday to a wonderfully meaty, broad-breasted white turkey that grew to maturity in a remarkably short period: just 136 days, on average.

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Science
4:05 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Scientists Analyze Skeletal Remains From Vampire Graveyard

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 11:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Research News
4:05 am
Thu November 27, 2014

Search For Political Common Ground Is Difficult, Research Shows

Originally published on Thu November 27, 2014 11:12 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Thanksgiving - a day to gather with relatives around the dinner table, engage in conversations, like this one...

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As character) I know how you feel.

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Health
4:24 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Colorectal Cancer Cases Are Dropping — Except Among Young Adults

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 5:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
4:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Shrinking Sea Ice Could Put Polar Bears In Grave Peril By 2100

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 5:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Environment
4:22 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Lower Ozone Standard Would Raise The Compliance Bar For Business

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 5:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
4:59 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Ebola Is Changing Course In Liberia. Will The U.S. Military Adapt?

A helicopter's eye view of a new ETU, funded by USAID and built by Save the Children.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 5:31 pm

The Ebola outbreak started in rural areas, but by June it had reached Liberia's capital, Monrovia.

By August, the number of people contracting the Ebola virus in the country was doubling every week. The Liberian government and aid workers begged for help.

Enter the U.S. military, who along with other U.S. agencies had a clear plan in mid-September to build more Ebola treatment units, or ETUs. At least one would be built in the major town of each of Liberia's 15 counties. That way, sick patients in those counties wouldn't bring more Ebola to the capital.

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Shots - Health News
10:24 am
Tue November 25, 2014

How Can Vultures Eat Rotten Roadkill And Survive?

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 2:31 pm

You might wonder why 48 million Americans get food poisoning every year, yet there are some animals that seem to be immune from even the nastiest germs.

We're talking here about vultures, which feast on rotting flesh that is chockablock with bacteria that would be deadly to human beings. In fact, vultures have a strong preference for that kind of food.

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NPR Story
4:20 am
Tue November 25, 2014

New Bird Species Sings Sweetly In Sulawesi

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 7:02 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
2:51 am
Tue November 25, 2014

As Ebola Pingpongs In Liberia, Cases Disappear Into The Jungle

A hand-drawn map on the wall of a rural clinic shows health workers where a woman with Ebola may be hiding.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 7:59 am

There's a new phase of Ebola in Liberia. Epidemiologists call it pingponging.

Back in March, the disease was found in the rural areas. Then as people came to the capital to seek care, it started growing exponentially there. Now, some sick people are going back to their villages, and the disease has pingponged to the rural areas again.

So that's where we're headed — into the hot, thick jungle of Liberia to investigate a new Ebola hotspot.

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Science
4:46 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

'Queen Of Carbon' Among Medal Of Freedom Honorees

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 9:15 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And we're going to meet one of the other recipients of this year's Medal of Freedom. She's known in science circles as the Queen of Carbon, but she's a little more modest.

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Science & Health
12:05 pm
Mon November 24, 2014

U.A. Student Attending Climate Conference in Peru

Catherine King
Matthew Wood, University of Alabama

A University of Alabama student is heading to Lima, Peru next month for a United Nations conference on climate change.  Catherine King is a chemical engineering major with a focus on green chemistry.  She’s one of 8 students across the country the American Chemical Society selected to attend the conference.  King says the issue of climate change has become too politicized.

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Science
4:11 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

Could Magnets Help Lessen The Impact Of Concussions In Football?

Originally published on Sun November 23, 2014 5:23 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Humans
6:21 am
Sun November 23, 2014

Why People Take Risks To Help Others: Altruism's Roots In The Brain

Originally published on Sun November 23, 2014 12:26 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When someone does something utterly selfless, you might think, oh, they're just a generous kind of soul. But new research suggests altruism may be hardwired in the brain. Reporter Michelle Trudeau has more.

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Sun November 23, 2014

A Bus Isn't The Only Thing That Can Be Powered By Poop

Mango trees would be grateful for the nutrients in human poop.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 4:20 pm

What can you do with human waste? Besides flushing it?

That's a question that came to mind when we read about the United Kingdom's first-ever "Bio-bus." It's a tour bus that runs between the cities of Bristol and Bath. The tank is filled with biomethane gas generated from food waste and human excrement.

And it turns out that the bus isn't the only example of poo power.

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