Science & Health

Science & Health
10:55 am
Thu November 1, 2012

How An Antibody Found In Monkeys Could Help Make An Ebola Vaccine

A microbiologist runs an experiment to count hemorrhagic fever viruses at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
Scott Smith CDC

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:34 pm

Just the word Ebola can send shivers down the spine.

And no wonder.

Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses around, and there aren't any approved treatments or vaccines for it.

Scientists have been experimenting with an Ebola vaccine in animals for the past few years, but they've been stymied. There's no easy way to test its effectiveness in people.

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Science & Health
7:47 am
Wed October 31, 2012

AU Prof to Study Wild Pig Problem in Morocco

Auburn University will study a growing pig problem in Morocco.
Credit en.wikipedia.org

Auburn University is going to help out with a pig problem in the north African nation of Morocco.


Auburn professor Steve Ditchkoff has received an $80,000 grant from the Moroccan government to help study and curb its growing population of wild pigs.

The swine can cause environmental damage and make life tougher for domestic livestock and wildlife.


Ditchkoff will conduct a pilot study of a pig trapping method developed by a graduate student. The goal is to see whether it can be adapted to help round up pigs in Morocco.

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Science & Health
7:58 am
Tue October 30, 2012

UAB Gets $3.1M Grant for Nursing

The University of Alabama at Birmingham will receive $3.1 million in federal grants that officials say will help put hundreds more nurses and teachers into Alabama's workforce.


A statement from the school says the grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will have an impact over the next four years and beyond.


The money will fund four programs designed for students pursuing a master's degree or higher in nursing. Graduate students comprise 70 percent of the nursing school's student body.

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Science & Health
7:55 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Health Officials Close Doors of Clanton Hospital

Alabama's Department of Health is suspending the license of the Chilton Medical Center.
Credit chiltonmedicalcenter.net

The Alabama Department of Health has issued an emergency order suspending the license of Clanton Hospital and closing its doors.


The hospital operates as the Chilton Medical Center. It was given notice earlier this month that its license could be revoked.


An attorney for the health department, Brian Hale, said Monday the hospital didn't have enough money for payroll checks for employees. Hale said there were two patients in the 60-bed hospital Monday and they were being transferred to hospitals in Alabaster and Birmingham.

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Science & Health
8:03 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Ala to Get Gusts up to 40 mph Linked to Sandy

Credit www.srh.noaa.gov

Forecasters say eastern Alabama is in for a windy day because of Hurricane Sandy.

The National Weather Service says northwest winds of at least 20 mph with gusts up to 40 mph are possible through sunset Monday.


Forecasters say the breezy northwest winds are due to the interaction of high pressure to the northwest and low pressure from Sandy to the northeast.


The strongest winds are expected east of Interstate 65, particularly in the higher elevations in the state's northeastern corner.

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Science & Health
6:27 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Dry Weather, Gusty Winds Raise Fire Threat in Ala

Forecasters say the dry, windy weather is increasing the risk of wildfires in southeast Alabama.

The National Weather Service has issued a fire weather watch for the area south and east of a line extending from Autaugaville to Alexander City.

Winds blowing 15 mph will gust up to 30 mph, and the relative humidity is expected to drop as low as 27 percent.

Forecasters say the combination will make it easier for fires to start and spread, so they're recommending against any outdoor burning.

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Science & Health
5:24 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Fewer Americans Need Vitamin D Supplements Under New Guidelines

For vitamin D supplements, more isn't necessarily better.
Jimmy Anderson iStockPhoto

Researchers largely agree that about half of Americans are probably not getting enough vitamin D from the places we've traditionally gotten it: food and sunlight. And that's a problem because vitamin D keeps calcium from leaking out of our bones; too little vitamin D can also be a factor in kidney disease and skeletal problems.

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Science & Health
12:50 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Study Results Linking Diet Soda To Cancer Fall Into The 'Gray Zone' Of Science

The co-author of a controversial study on diet soda's link to blood cancers says his results fall into a gray zone between a clear relationship and no relationship at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 6:03 pm

As Allison Aubrey reported on The Salt, a brouhaha has erupted in Cambridge, Ma., over a study published yesterday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Science & Health
9:50 am
Thu October 25, 2012

Many Terminal Cancer Patients Mistakenly Believe A Cure Is Possible

Dr. Joel Policzer checks on his patient, Lillian Landry, in the hospice wing of an Florida hospital in 2009. A new study found that many terminally ill cancer patients don't fully understand their prognosis.
J. Pat Carter AP

Doctors are often called upon to deliver bad news to patients, and there isn't much that's worse than a diagnosis of an advanced-stage cancer for which there is no cure.

But there's new evidence that a surprisingly large majority of patients who receive this news don't fully comprehend it, or perhaps willfully choose to ignore it.

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The Salt
1:26 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Buying Food Past Its Sell-By Date Tough To Swallow For Greeks

Bargain-hunting Greek shoppers may soon have more options at the grocery store. The government is asking retailers to discount expired nonperishable products in response to rising food prices.
Fayez Nureldine AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 9:00 am

Austerity measures continue in Greece as the country sinks deeper into a recession. Incomes have dropped nearly 50 percent in some cases, but food prices are at record highs. The Greek newspaper Ekathimerini recently reported that the country has some of the most expensive food and the costliest dairy products in the entire European Union.

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The Salt
12:19 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Monster Beverage Under Fire As Reports Link Deaths To Its Energy Drinks

The Food and Drug Administration has confirmed that it received five reports in the past past three years suggesting that people died after drinking caffeinated energy drinks.

But the agency also cautions that these reports do not add up to proof that the beverages actually caused those deaths. These reports — called adverse event reports — are considered unconfirmed allegations, and the FDA doesn't usually release them.

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The Salt
9:59 am
Tue October 23, 2012

How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

The fly larvae in the AgriProtein factory feed on cow blood and bran.
Courtesy of Jason Drew

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 3:19 pm

What's the lowly house fly got to do with the $60 billion fish farming industry?

Quite a lot, says Jason Drew, a jet-setting British entrepreneur who is so enthusiastic about the potential of flies, he's just written a book called The Story of the Fly and How It Could Save the World. He thinks flies can solve one of aquaculture's most vexing issues: what to feed the growing ranks of farmed fish.

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Strange News
4:53 am
Tue October 23, 2012

A Captive Beluga Whale's Remarkably Human Song

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a tale of the singing whale. Scientists this week published a study of a captive beluga whale in San Diego. The whale began to sing, apparently after spending time close to people. It died several years ago, but left behind a recording that sounds like a person in the shower.

(SOUNDBITE OF WHALE SINGING)

INSKEEP: We do not know if during his lifetime the singing whale ever made it to a karaoke bar.

Shots - Health News
11:55 am
Mon October 22, 2012

HIV Finding Opens New Path For Vaccine Research

The HIV-1 virus cultivated with human lymphocytes.
C. Goldsmith, P. Feorino, E. L. Palmer, W. R. McManus CDC Public Health Image Library

Researchers in South Africa have learned something new about how antibodies fight off HIV in research that could advance the quest to develop a vaccine against the virus.

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Science
7:11 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Amateur 'Planet Hunters' Find One With Four Suns

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now is the moment in the program when I admit that I am a total Star Wars nut. Those of you with me, you might recall that Luke Skywalker's home planet of Tatooine enjoyed the warmth of not one but two suns. That dramatic scene, you remember Luke at dusk gazing at the weird peaceful sunset.

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