Science & Health

Science & Health
12:19 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Elvis Left The Building Long Ago, But His Food (And Music) Lives On

A still-trim Elvis Presley enjoys a sandwich in 1958. His love of fatty foods hadn't caught up to him yet.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 6:12 pm

Elvis Presley was better known for his music than his gourmet tastes. But he did have a famous affinity for the fried goodness of the American South — and he had the waistline to prove it.

In honor of what would have been the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 78th birthday, let's take a look at some of his legendary eating habits.

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Science & Health
6:52 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Alabama Weight Loss Program Begins 7th Year

A program designed to help Alabamians lose weight is kicking off its seventh year.


The state Department of Public Health is encouraging four-member teams to start forming for Scale Back Alabama. The teams will weigh in the week of Jan. 19-25 and weigh out the week of April 6-12. The winners will be announced April 26.


There is no charge to enter. Teams where each member sheds at least 10 pounds are eligible for a random drawing where the first prize is $4,000, the second prize $2,000 and the third prize $1,000.

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Mine Deaths
4:17 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

Coal Mine Accidents Kill 19 Workers In US In 2012

Of the 19 mining deaths in the U.S. in 2012, two were in Alabama.
Credit Mine Safety and Health Administration / Wikimedia Commons

Preliminary figures show 19 coal miners in the U.S. were killed on the job in 2012, down from 21 the previous year.


West Virginia led the nation with seven coal mining deaths.


The figures from the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration show Kentucky had four coal mining deaths, followed by Alabama with two. Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee and Virginia each recorded one death.


There also were 17 metal and nonmetal mining deaths, up from 16 in 2011. These fatalities bring the overall death toll in the mining industry to 36.

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Science & Health
6:53 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Hospital Moves Labor and Delivery, Pediatric Units

A hospital in Decatur is moving its labor and delivery unit and pediatric department to another facility this week.


The Decatur Daily reports Decatur-Morgan Hospital is moving the units from Parkway Hospital to Decatur General Hospital to help offer a more unified health system in Morgan County.


Officials say the move will also save the hospital about $100,000 annually, and no employees will lose their jobs as a result of the consolidation.

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Science & Health
6:40 am
Thu December 27, 2012

Group Lists Environmental Gains for Alabama

Green Resource Center
birmingham365.org

A group that promotes environmental awareness says Alabama made some big gains in 2012.


The Green Resource Center for Alabama has released its 5th annual Green Progress Report. It says the extension of the Forever Wild land trust program was one of the state's top environmental achievements.


Voters approved continuing the program in November. The 20-year-old program has let the state buy 220,000 acres of land to be used for hunting, fishing, bird watching and other activities.

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Science & Health
8:37 am
Sat December 15, 2012

Alabama hospital pays damages for patient death

istockphoto

BAY MINETTE, Ala. (AP) — The family of a 59-year-old diabetic woman who was mistakenly given a lethal dose of insulin at an Alabama hospital has been awarded a $140 million judgment.

AL.com (http://bit.ly/Y3h1tT) reports a Baldwin County Circuit Court judge ordered Thomas Hospital and three other firms to pay the family of Sharron Juno, of Daphne, who died in 2008.

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Science & Health
1:37 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

We're Living Longer, But Not All That Healthier

Average life expectancy around the world has ticked up over the past twenty years. Here it's shown for men in 2009. The extremes are in dark green and dark red, which represent 78 to 82 years old and less than 66 years old, respectively.
Courtesy of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 3:52 pm

People around the world are living longer than they did two decades ago, but many people aren't very healthy during those extra years.

That's a key finding from a large-scale study estimating what makes people sick worldwide.

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Science & Health
1:59 pm
Tue December 4, 2012

A Polio Outbreak In Pakistan Reveals Gaps In Vaccination

A child is inoculated with the polio vaccine at a traffic checkpoint just outside Pakistan's capital, Islamabad. Roadside vaccinations help health workers reach children in mobile populations.
Jackie Northam NPR

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 8:55 am

Pakistan has made a lot of progress this year in wiping out polio. There are signs that one type of poliovirus is gone and transmission of other strains seems to be slowing.

But a recent outbreak of polio there has health officials concerned about the overall effectiveness of the effort to eliminate polio in that country.

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Flu Season
4:58 pm
Mon December 3, 2012

US Flu Season Starts Early, Could Be Bad, CDC Says

Health officials say the flu season is off to its earliest start in 10 years.
Credit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Wikimedia Commons

Health officials say flu season is off to its earliest start in nearly 10 years — and it could be a bad one.


The primary strain circulating is one that tends to cause more severe illness, especially in the elderly.


But officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the nation seems to be fairly well prepared. More than a third of Americans have been vaccinated, and the vaccine is well matched to the strains of flu so far.

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Science & Health
6:42 am
Fri November 30, 2012

NASA Demolishing Old Rocket Test Stand at Marshall

Credit NASA

The nation's space agency is tearing down a rocket test stand in Huntsville that was once used by engineers working to send astronauts to the moon.


The National Aeronautics and Space Administration says workers will use explosives to demolish the concrete towers of Test Stand 4696 at Redstone Arsenal near Huntsville on Friday.

The 239-foot-tall tower was built in 1962 to test F-1 engines, which helped power Saturn V rockets to the moon. Documents show it hasn't been used since 1969, the year astronauts first landed on the lunar surface.

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Science & Health
4:11 pm
Thu November 29, 2012

Greenland, Antarctic Ice Is Melting Faster

An iceberg that likely calved from Jakobshavn Isbrae, the fastest glacier in western Greenland.
Ian Joughin Science/AAAS

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 4:44 pm

Superstorm Sandy sparked a lot of interest in rising sea levels when it swept across the Northeast last month and flooded parts of the coast. Over the next century, more water — and higher sea levels — could come from melting ice in Greenland and Antarctica. How much has been unclear.

But now scientists have developed a much clearer view of how quickly that ice has been melting over the past two decades. And that will help researchers forecast the rate of sea-level rise in the years to come.

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Science & Health
1:05 pm
Thu November 29, 2012

Space Probe Finds Ice In Mercury's Craters

Researchers say they have identified traces of ice in craters on Mercury, seen here in this Oct. 8, 2008, image from the Messenger spacecraft.
NASA

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 4:37 pm

Mercury is not the first planet to come to mind if you were searching for ice in the solar system. After all, the surface temperature across most of the planet is hot enough to melt lead.

But at the poles on Mercury it's a different story. Almost no sun reaches the poles, and as a result, temperatures can drop to less than -100 degrees Fahrenheit. Now, three papers in the journal Science suggest there really is ice at the bottom of craters near the poles on Mercury.

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Science & Health
7:59 am
Thu November 29, 2012

Key To E. Coli-Free Spinach May Be An Ultrasonic Spa Treatment

Spinach has lots of opportunities to pick up E. coli and other bugs during harvest and growing. Here, a Mexican migrant worker cuts organic spinach during the fall harvest at Grant Family Farms in Wellington, Co.
John Moore Getty Images

Salad producers haven't succeeded in banishing E. coli and other dangerous microbes from fresh greens, though they've tried hard. As we've reported before, it's a major challenge to both growers and the environment. But one scientist thinks he's making progress – with a spinach spa that zaps bad bugs with ultrasound.

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Science & Health
4:29 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

HIV Infections Rise Among Young Black Men In U.S.

A young man places an oral swab into a solution to complete an HIV test during a free screening event in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 3:11 pm

The latest data on HIV rates in American teenagers and young adults offer a sobering message.

While the number of new infections in the U.S. is relatively stable — at about 50,000 people each year — HIV is on the rise in young people under 25.

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Science & Health
3:58 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

A Risky Mix: Grapefruit And Quite A Few Drugs

Grapefruit can make for a tasty addition to breakfast. But it can also interfere with some medications.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 2:44 pm

Grapefruit sprinkled with a little sugar has just the right amount of kick for a morning meal. But when the bitter fruit is mixed with medication, things can get a bit tricky.

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