Science & Health

Education
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Reading, Writing, 'Rithmetic...and Respect?

Some psychologists say teaching emotional literacy in school is key to better behavior — and better grades. Marc Brackett and Maurice Elias, two experts in social emotional learning, talk about how emotional literacy is woven into a standard curriculum, and how it can tackle problems like bullying and absenteeism.

Global Health
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

New Vaccine Beats Malaria in Early Trials

Reporting in Science, researchers write of an intravenous vaccine that offered complete protection against malaria in a small clinical trial — but only after five doses. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, discusses steps needed to turn this early success into a practical vaccine.

Environment
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Climate Update: Warming Temperatures

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its annual "State of the Climate" assessment. Deke Arndt, an editor of the report, discusses warming temperatures and other climate trends from 2012. Plus, Sol Hsiang, who studies climate and violence, discusses his research connecting rising temperatures to increases in human conflict.

Food
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Biting Into the First In Vitro Burger

Dutch scientists cooked up the first hamburger made from laboratory-grown meat. Researcher Nicholas Genovese, who is studying stem cell lines for in vitro meat, and journalist Josh Schonwald, who ate the burger, give us their review.

Technology
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Flexible Insect Protein Inspires Super Rubber

Resilin is a protein found in insects that allows them to jump long distances and beat their wings quickly. The material stores and releases energy due to its unique structure. Biomedical engineer Kristi Kiick is researching how to use these pliable proteins for medical purposes.

Science
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Desktop Diaries: Tim White

"People get really interested in learning about where they came from. It's genealogy writ large," says paleoanthropologist Tim White about evolutionary history. When White isn't hunting for remains of our human ancestors in Africa, he's stationed in his museum-like office at the University of California, Berkeley, where he's director of the Human Evolution Research Center.

Space
11:00 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Comet Dust Brings a Spectacular Sky Show

The annual Perseid meteor shower, produced by remnants of the Swift-Tuttle comet, is back. Dean Regas, outreach astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory, says the best time to see streaks will be in the early morning hours of August 12.

TED Radio Hour
9:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

The Hackers

When typical solutions fall short, why not find a different way?
Thinkstock

Originally published on Fri December 6, 2013 9:08 am

A hacker is somebody who doesn't ask how something works — they just see what works. — Jay Silver

Science and technology now allow us to "hack" solutions to the biggest challenges of our time. But how far is too far? And what are the consequences of these hacks? In this hour, we hear stories from TED speakers who dare to hack the brain, the climate, and even the animal kingdom in hopes of creating a better world.

TED Radio Hour
9:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Are We Ready To Hack The Animal Kingdom?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 12:46 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About Stewart Brand's TEDTalk

Mankind has driven species after species extinct. Now Stewart Brand says, we have the technology to bring back the species that we wiped out. So should we? Which ones? He asks a big question whose answer is closer than you may think.

About Stewart Brand

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TED Radio Hour
9:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Hacking The Brain Make You Healthier?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 12:45 pm

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About Andres Lozano's TEDTalk

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano talks about dramatic findings in deep brain stimulation including a woman with Parkinson's who instantly stops shaking, and brain areas eroded by Alzheimer's that are brought back to life.

About Andres Lozano

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TED Radio Hour
9:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Hacking The Stratosphere Solve Climate Change?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 1:43 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About David Keith's TEDTalk

Environmental scientist David Keith proposes a cheap and shocking way to address climate change: What if we inject a huge cloud of sulfur into the atmosphere to deflect sunlight and heat?

About David Keith

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The Salt
2:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Colorful covers of menus from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel (left) and the Monarch Room Royal Hawaiian Hotel.
New York Public Library

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 2:53 pm

In the early to mid-1900s, the islands of Hawaii were a far-away, exotic destination. People who managed to get there often kept mementos of that journey including kitschy menus from Hawaiian fine dining restaurants and hotels like like Trader Vic's and Prince Kuhio's.

Now these old menus are serving a purpose beyond colorful relics from the past. Kyle Van Houtan, an ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says he's found a scientific purpose for the menus.

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All Tech Considered
2:03 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Why Aren't More Girls Attracted To Physics?

Girls are more likely to take high school physics if they see women in their communities working in science, technology, engineering and math, a new study finds.
Dominik Pabis iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 8:05 pm

You don't need to be a social scientist to know there is a gender diversity problem in technology. The tech industry in Silicon Valley and across the nation is overwhelmingly male-dominated.

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Shots - Health News
6:04 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Test

A red blood cell infected with malaria parasites (blue) sits next to normal cells (red).
NIAID Flickr.com

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:02 am

A viable, effective vaccine against malaria has long eluded scientists. Results from a preliminary study have ignited hope that a new type of vaccine could change that.

The experimental vaccine offered strong protection against malaria when given at high doses, scientists report Thursday in the journal Science.

The study was extremely small and short-term. And the candidate vaccine still has a long way to go before it could be used in the developing world.

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Environment
4:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Swinging CO2 Levels Show The Earth Is 'Breathing' More Deeply

Plants accumulate carbon in the spring and summer, and they release it back into the atmosphere in the fall in winter. And a change in the landscape of the Arctic tundra, seen here, means that shrubs hold onto snow better, which keeps the organic-rich soils warmer and more likely to release carbon dioxide that's stored there.
Jean-Erick Pasquier Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 8:34 pm

Plant life on our planet soaks up a fair amount of the carbon dioxide that pours out of our tailpipes and smokestacks. Plants take it up during the summer and return some of it to the air in the winter. And a new study shows that those "breaths" have gotten deeper over the past 50 years.

This isn't just a curiosity. Plant life is helping to reduce the speed at which carbon dioxide is building up in our atmosphere. That's slowing the global warming, at least marginally, so scientists are eager to understand how this process works. The new study provides some clues.

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