Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

The Senate has confirmed President Trump's nominee Jeff Sessions to be the next attorney general, bringing an end to a bitter confirmation fight that has dredged up past accusations of racism against the Alabama senator.

The vote was largely along party lines, 52-47, with only centrist Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia voting yes. Sessions himself voted "present" on his own nomination.

Customers who walked through the door of Everyman Espresso, a cafe in New York's East Village, last weekend got a pitch at the check-out counter to support a fundraiser to help defend immigrants.

"We're donating 5 percent [of our proceeds] to the ACLU in response to the travel ban," Eric Grimm, a manager at the cafe, explained.

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Decorations are sparse at Recovery Point, a residential treatment center in Huntington, W.Va. That's why the bulletin board covered with photos of men stands out. The men spent time here, but didn't survive their addictions. They're all dead now.

"We keep a constant reminder in here for individuals who come into our detox facility. We have, 'But for the grace of God, there go I,'" says Executive Director Matt Boggs, pointing to the words on the board.

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White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is known to have cultivated ties with far-right parties in Europe, like the National Front in France. He also seems to have forged an alliance with Vatican hard-liners who oppose Pope Francis' less rigid approach to church doctrine. The New York Times reported this week on Bannon's connections at the Vatican.

A three-judge panel in North Carolina has issued a temporary restraining order blocking a law that strips the state's new governor of some powers.

The law was signed by outgoing Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and requires state Senate approval for Cabinet nominees of the new Democratic administration, something that was not required for McCrory's own nominees.

The Republican-controlled state Legislature passed the measure after McCrory lost November's election to Democrat Roy Cooper. Democrats called it a "power grab."

President Trump addressed the legal battle over his immigration ban on Wednesday morning, saying the courts "seem so political."

Speaking to a gathering of sheriffs and police chiefs in Washington, D.C., Trump said he had watched television coverage of the oral arguments before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday night "in amazement" and that he "heard things that I couldn't believe."

When Senate Republicans silenced Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., during debate over the nomination of Jeff Sessions to serve as attorney general, they sparked a furious response — but also used a rule that's meant to encourage civil debate.

If President Trump wants to keep his promise to send new detainees to the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, there's plenty of room.

"We haven't received any orders to take additional detainees in," says Navy Capt. John Filostrat. "But if given the order, we could go ahead and comply."

A day after Senate Republicans invoked a conduct rule to end Sen. Elizabeth Warren's speech against the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions as U.S. attorney general, a 1986 letter from Coretta Scott King urging the Senate to reject Sessions' nomination as a federal judge is gaining new prominence.

The words were those of Coretta Scott King, widow of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

But they resulted in a rarely invoked Senate rule being used to formally silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

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Years ago, I was driving a car while listening to the radio, voices talking in the Supreme Court, which allowed an audio feed of the arguments about the 2000 election, Bush v. Gore.

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What The Left Can Learn From The Tea Party

Feb 8, 2017

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Drug companies could be forgiven if they're confused about whether President Trump thinks the government should get involved in negotiating the price of prescription drugs for Medicare patients.

Just a few days before Trump was sworn in, he said the pharmaceutical industry was "getting away with murder" in the way it prices medicine, and he promised to take the industry on. It was a promise he'd made repeatedly on the campaign trail.

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It's a little icky all around.

First lady Melania Trump is seeking $150 million from the Daily Mail newspaper, charging in a lawsuit filed Monday in New York state commercial court that the outlet published damaging and unfounded allegations that she once worked as an "elite escort" in the "sex business."

At a roundtable meeting with county sheriffs on Tuesday morning, President Trump repeated a false statistic about the U.S. murder rate that he repeatedly deployed on the campaign trail.

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