Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

Hospital pharmacist Mandy Langston remembers when Lulabelle Berry arrived at the emergency center of Stone County Medical Center in Mountain View, Ark., last year.

Berry couldn't talk. Her face was drooping on one side. Her eyes couldn't focus.

"She was basically unresponsive," Langston recalls.

Tens of thousands of people write letters or emails to the White House each day. Only a handful make it to the president's desk.

But when someone offers to mow your lawn for free, it gets your attention. Especially when that someone is only 10 years old.

Frank "FX" Giaccio made that offer to the president this summer saying, "I'd like to show the nation what young people like me are ready for."

Friday News Roundup - International

Sep 15, 2017

More than 12,000 troops from Russia and Belarus are engaged in war games that have prompted Ukraine’s capital city Kiev to ramp up border security. Is this massive joint military exercise anything to worry about?

Plus, the long process of rebuilding has begun in the Caribbean after Hurricane Irma while residents are on edge that another big storm could strike the already devastated islands.

The federal ethics agency may be opening the door for anonymous donors to pay legal fees for White House staffers.

It could happen just as special counsel Robert Mueller draws closer to the White House in his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible collusion with Trump campaign.

Several conservative and pro-Trump groups are said to be considering creating such funds to help White House staffers who may be interviewed by investigators, but who can't afford Washington's high-priced ethics lawyers.

By springtime of 2016, it looked like California might have a decisive role in choosing the presidential nominee for a major party for the first time in several generations.

With the June primary approaching last year, Hillary Clinton toured the state, while Bernie Sanders spent nearly an entire month holding rallies and giving speeches. Meanwhile Donald Trump and his Republican rivals were building organizations in the state.

Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

A day after meeting with Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., to discuss improving race relations, policy issues of specific concern to communities of color and Scott's pointed criticism of President Trump after his comments in response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Trump is standing by those remarks.

Conservatives are livid after President Trump appeared to have made a deal with Democrats in order to save the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program — claiming he is abandoning his base and the stringent immigration platform he campaigned on.

Prisoner advocates convened at an unusual spot this week: President Trump's White House.

Earlier this year, Trump promised to crack down on "American carnage" and decried the "public safety crisis" facing many American cities. His attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has directed federal prosecutors to take a tough approach to drug criminals, seeking mandatory-minimum prison terms for them.

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is undergoing treatment for a deadly form of brain cancer, but you would never know it by watching his management of the Senate floor this week.

Walking through mobile homes ravaged by Hurricane Irma in Naples, Fla., President Trump praised first responders and residents for doing an "incredible" job on rescue and recovery. Earlier in his one-day visit to Florida, Trump also lauded state and federal officials for their preparation and response to the hurricane.

"We love the people of Florida and they went through something that, I guess, the likes of which we could really say nobody's ever seen before," Trump said in Naples.

During a press conference on Aug. 15, President Trump was asked by a reporter why he waited so long to "blast neo-Nazis" in the wake of the white supremacist rally held the previous weekend in Charlottesville, Va.

That rally resulted in the death of Heather Heyer, a young counterprotester, and injuries to dozens of others.

Two deadlines are approaching that may signal the fate of the 2015 nuclear agreement known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. The agreement saw Iran sharply curtail its nuclear program and allow extensive inspections in return for the lifting of international sanctions.

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Now we're going to hear why Vermont couldn't make a single-payer health system work. In 2011, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin described what he called Green Mountain Care on PRI's "The Takeaway."

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "THE TAKEAWAY")

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Senator Bernie Sanders was joined by several prominent Democratic senators today announcing a plan he calls Medicare-for-All.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Story updated at 6:05 p.m. ET

Retired Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn may have lobbied on behalf of a vast foreign deal to build a fleet of nuclear reactors across the Middle East as he was serving as national security adviser, according to new documents out Wednesday.

Two top House Democrats questioned Flynn's use of his office in a letter they sent to business leaders with whom Flynn worked on the project.

Facts And Friction

Sep 13, 2017

There’s no such thing, unfortunately, anymore as facts.

-Donald Trump surrogate Scottie Nell Hughes on the Diane Rehm Show, November 30, 2016

By Amanda Williams

Arizona Senator Jeff Flake says Republicans are in a precarious position. And the threat is coming from inside the party.

“In 1960 Barry Goldwater felt that the conservative movement and the Republican Party had been compromised by the New Deal, and 57 years later, I think the conservative movement and the Republican Party is being compromised by populism,” Flake said.

Former Sen. Pete Domenici, who championed balanced budgets, nuclear energy and parity for mental illnesses in health insurance during his six terms in office, died Wednesday morning in Albuquerque, N.M.

The New Mexico Republican was 85. His death was confirmed by his son Pete Domenici Jr.'s law office and announced on the Senate floor by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who also tweeted the news:

The Justice Department has notified Senate investigators that it will not make FBI officials available for interviews because doing so could pose conflicts with the work of special counsel Robert Mueller.

Leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee had sought to meet with the FBI's chief of staff, James Rybicki, and the executive assistant director of its national security branch, Carl Ghattas, as part of their review into the dismissal of then-FBI Director James Comey earlier this year.

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The 1962 Alabama governor's race featured the modern media television for the first time. Big Jim Folsom had won his two previous races campaigning from the back of a flatbed truck making speeches throughout the state...

President Trump and his allies aren't exactly running the playbook Republicans want him to ahead of the 2018 midterms. And that could be costly for the GOP at the ballot box next year.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., met with President Trump at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the president's response to last month's protests and racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., as well as specific issues facing communities of color.

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Well, there have been the Russia investigations that are still ongoing, hurricanes, North Korea, but the White House does seem now to be focusing on a big Republican agenda item.

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