Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

The hubbub over the Republican tax plan has died down some since it passed, but the bill isn't forgotten — not by a long shot.

Czech President Milos Zeman has won the first round of voting in the Czech Republic's presidential election Saturday, but will have to face second-place finisher Jiri Drahos in a runoff election later this month after failing to win a majority of votes.

Zeman, 73, who has been president of the central European country since 2013, emerged with 38.6 percent of the vote. He has stoked controversy in parts of Europe with support for Russia's Vladimir Putin and anti-immigrant rhetoric. Zeman was also an early supporter of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election.

The Department of Homeland Security says it will once again accept renewal requests from recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in response to a court order.

"Until further notice, and unless otherwise provided in this guidance, the DACA policy will be operated on the terms in place before it was rescinded on Sept. 5, 2017," U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a part of DHS, wrote on its website Saturday.

John Tunney, the former U.S. senator who looked briefly like the future of the Democratic Party and whose rise inspired the Robert Redford film, The Candidate, has died, his brother confirmed to NPR on Saturday.

Tunney died of prostate cancer Friday in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 83.

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Federal Election Commission documents dated Jan. 11 show that Chelsea Manning has filed paperwork to run as a Democrat for Maryland's U.S. Senate seat this year.

The race would pit her against two-term Sen. Ben Cardin in the June Democratic primary. Cardin is Maryland's senior U.S. senator, elected in 2006 and re-elected in 2012. He is the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

In a White House meeting with members of Congress this week, President Trump is said to have suggested that the United States accepts too many immigrants from "shithole countries" in Africa and too few from countries like Norway.

What's Next For Salvadorans In The U.S.

Jan 13, 2018

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Sen. Ron Wyden On Russia Investigation

Jan 13, 2018

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President Trump's vulgar remark about immigrants from certain countries has played out differently in this country depending on the media outlet. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann has a roundup.

This week in the Russia investigations: President Trump rows back on a potential Robert Mueller interview, Sen. Dianne Feinstein releases a big transcript, and Steve Bannon is headed to the House Intelligence Committee.

The exile

Once upon a time, Steve Bannon was among the princes of the universe. Loved by his allies and hated by his foes, he was, most importantly, feared by both.

"Same insult, different day."

The ugliest profanity President Trump uttered about immigrants and their countries of origin may not be the single word we've heard and read over and over these past couple of days. It was when the president reportedly asked the bipartisan group of legislators at the White House, "Why do we want all these people here?" — an apparent reference to people from Africa especially — then added: "We should have more people from Norway."

The new U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands has said anti-Muslim comments he made in 2015 were "just wrong," two days after a news conference when he wouldn't say the comments were factually inaccurate.

Pete Hoekstra, a former Republican congressman from Michigan who was appointed to the ambassador position by President Trump, talked in 2015 about the "Islamic movement" being responsible for "no-go zones" and the burning of cars and politicians in the Netherlands:

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET

The nation's top spy bosses scrambled to the White House early Thursday to urge President Trump to restate his support for a controversial surveillance law after he spent the morning trashing it on Twitter.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, White House chief of staff John Kelly and national security adviser H.R. McMaster all convened in the Oval Office with the president to urge him to row back his criticism. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., also joined in by telephone.

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With me now to talk about all this are columnists E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution - hey, E.J...

E J DIONNE, BYLINE: Great to be with you.

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To take a broader look at the British relationship with the U.S. under President Trump, George Parker joins us now. He is the political editor with the Financial Times. Welcome.

GEORGE PARKER: Hello.

Jeff Borders grins with pride as he watches a logging truck rumble down the mountain into a river cut canyon near his hometown of Orofino, Idaho. Logging will always be part of his heritage.

"I started getting into it when I was just out of high school, dad got me in on the company he was working for hookin' logs," Borders says.

His dad, his grandpa, and nearly everyone around here have worked in the woods.

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When President Trump announced Thursday that he was canceling his visit to the United Kingdom next month to open the new U.S. Embassy in London, he sounded less like the leader of the world's most powerful country and more like the real estate developer he once was.

On Twitter, he complained that the Obama administration (it was actually George W. Bush's) had traded an embassy located in one of the British capital's top districts, Mayfair, for a new one in "an off location for 1.2 billion dollars. Bad deal. Wanted me to cut ribbon-NO!"

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