Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

THIS POST WAS UPDATED AT 4:01 P.M. ET

A fresh batch of previously-unreleased State Department emails are raising new questions about the relationship between the Clinton Foundation and the State Department during the years Hillary Clinton served as Secretary of State.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump laid out his plan for the economy on Monday; Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton will take her turn on Thursday.

While candidates are talking about tax rates, tax breaks and trade, they are ignoring an economic issue that soon may matter far more to working Americans: robots.

Donald Trump's suggestion that "maybe there is" something Second Amendment supporters could do to stop his Democratic rival from picking Supreme Court justices caused outrage among those who read it as an incitement to violence.

NPR was invited to observe two focus groups of swing voters from Ohio and Arizona on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. "Wal-Mart Moms" are identified by pollsters as women predominantly between the ages of 18 and 44, who have kids under 18 living at home and who shop at Wal-Mart stores at least once a month. In these groups, the women were identified only by their first names.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

House Speaker Paul Ryan easily defeated conservative business executive Paul Nehlen in Wisconsin's primary Tuesday night.

"I am humbled and honored that Wisconsinites in the 1st Congressional District support my efforts to keep fighting on their behalf," said a statement Ryan released late Tuesday. "Janna and I are grateful to have the support of so many in southern Wisconsin, and we are truly thankful for all of their hard work."

Another prominent Republican is refusing to endorse Donald Trump as the GOP presidential nominee.

In an op-ed for the Washington Post on Monday, Maine Sen. Susan Collins called Trump "unworthy" of the presidency and said he does not "reflect historical Republican values."

Collins spoke with NPR's Ari Shapiro on Tuesday, expanding on her decision not to back the Republican candidate.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, introduced her father at the Republican National Convention, she emphasized gender equality, advocating for more equal pay and more affordable childcare.

That came as a surprise to some; those points made her speech sound more Democratic than Republican, as NPR's Asma Khalid noted.

The parents of two Americans killed in Benghazi, Libya, are suing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton for wrongful death, alleging the 2012 attack "was directly and proximately caused" by the then-secretary of state's mishandling of government secrets.

The lawsuit filed this week in federal court in Washington, D.C., argued that Islamic terrorists were able to track the movements of Ambassador Chris Stevens and plot the deadly siege because of Clinton's use of a personal email server to conduct government business.

Among the 3,000 people Hillary Clinton drew to a rally in Florida last night was the father of the man responsible for killing 49 people at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on June 12, according to a local news report.

A Clinton campaign official tells NPR that the rally in Kissimmee, Fla., on Monday was open to the public. NBC affiliate WPTV identified one attendee as Seddique Mateen, the father of Omar Mateen, who was killed in a shootout with police after carrying out the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Churchgoing Americans say their preachers often speak out on hot social and political issues and occasionally back or oppose particular candidates in defiance of U.S. law prohibiting such endorsements.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn has been an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump, offering some credibility to the foreign policy newcomer.

But on a key priority of the GOP presidential nominee — banning travel to the United States from areas affected by terrorism — Flynn acknowledged some of Trump's ideas are "not workable."

In a Morning Edition interview, NPR's Steve Inskeep asked Flynn, "In the end do we have here a laudable effort to protect the United States from all harm that is just not workable at all?"

Maine Sen. Susan Collins is the latest high-profile Republican to announce she cannot support her party's presidential nominee this fall.

Republicans opposed to Donald Trump are making a last-ditch effort to put forth an alternative to the GOP presidential nominee.

Evan McMullin, a onetime chief policy director for House Republicans and a former CIA officer, is launching an independent presidential campaign with the help of political group Better for America.

Blasting Trump as personally unstable and "a real threat to our Republic," McMullin said on his website that he felt compelled to run as an independent.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to spend the next few minutes now with Avik Roy. He's the opinion editor at Forbes, and in the past, he's advised the presidential campaigns of Mitt Romney, Rick Perry and Marco Rubio. Welcome to the program.

Editor's note: NPR will also be fact-checking Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's planned economic speech this Thursday.

Donald Trump is coming off a week of disastrous headlines and cratering poll numbers. His major economic speech on Monday at the Detroit Economic Club, a vision described by his campaign as "Winning the Global Competition," was a chance to turn the page.

From the start of his presidential campaign, Donald Trump has had a bold and memorable, if implicitly negative, slogan, "Make America great again."

Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, struggled to settle on a slogan. There was "breaking down barriers" and "fighting for us" and "I'm with her." None had staying power. Now she has one, "stronger together" and she can thank Trump for giving it new meaning.

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