Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

photo by Mike Gonzalez

Atlanta GA – The state of Georgia has three years to get congressional approval to use Lake Lanier as a drinking water source for metro Atlanta. Recently, some politicians and environmentalists have suggested metro Atlanta turn to sources other than the Chattahoochee River for water. But as Georgia Public Broadcasting's John Sepulvado reports, there are four reasons why Lake Lanier is the only answer for metro Atlanta's water woes ...

 

photo by Linda Raffield

Tallahassee FL – The 19-year court battle among Florida, Georgia and Alabama over the river system they share has flared up again. Last month, a federal judge gave Georgia three years to get Congressional approval or lose Atlanta's main water source. But Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue vows to fight the ruling, and for those at the other end of the river system, the judge's deadline may come too late. In the first of a four part series on this issue, Florida Public Radio's Margie Menzel reports ...

photo by Brett Tannehill

Eufaula AL – In part one of this series, we met a Florida oysterman who wants to protect the future of Apalachichola Bay. A little ways upstream, the state of Alabama is also looking to the future and hopes the middle section of the A-C-F basin can fulfill one of its original intended functions as a commercial shipping channel. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill reports ...

 

Tuscaloosa AL – A recent court ruling struck down Georgia's use of Lake Lanier as the drinking water supply for metro-Atlanta ... and that has triggered a number of spirited remarks from Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue regarding the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin. The three states are heading back to the negotiating table with a three year deadline of putting this long running dispute to rest. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill sat down recently with Governor Bob Riley ...

Tuscaloosa AL – We've been investigating the capital murder case of Pickens County resident Bridget Lee - a troubled mother wrongly accused of killing her unborn baby based on what the court later ruled was a faulty autopsy. Our series concludes as we hear what's changed for Ms. Lee, and for the state of Alabama. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill reports ...

Tuscaloosa AL – In a 4-part series, we've been investigating the capital murder case of Pickens County resident Bridget Lee. In that case, a controversial autopsy accused Lee of smothering her newborn baby. In part 2, we focused on what went wrong with the case. Next, we'll hear what went right, and how the Lee case highlights a critical need for poor defendants. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill reports ...

Tuscaloosa AL – Pickens County resident Bridget Lee was facing a capital murder charge and spent nearly three years in confinement following a critical mistake made with the autopsy of her stillborn child. We're exploring her case in a four-part series. In part two, we'll take a closer look at what went wrong. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill reports ...

Tuscaloosa AL – The capital murder case of a Pickens County resident made a major impact on Alabama's legal landscape earlier this year. A controversial autopsy conducted on Bridget Lee's newborn baby landed her on the verge of a capital murder conviction. In this 4-part series, we'll take a closer look at what happened, why and how the case changed the way homicides are handled in Alabama. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill has the story ..

Tuscaloosa, AL – After eight hours of walking to and from yesterday's inaugural festivities there are plenty of hurting feet and worn backs around the nation's capital this morning. In our third conversation with Tuscaloosa resident Fran Viselli, we get some final impressions of the day now recorded in history.

Tuscaloosa AL – In a series of conversations, APR's Brandon Hollingsworth is speaking with Tuscaloosa resident Fran Viselli as he travels to D-C for the inauguration. This morning (Tuesday), Viselli is talking while walking down the Mall near the Washington Monument. We'll also hear from two other spectators waiting to see Barack Obama's inauguration and speech.

Tuscaloosa AL – For Bob Mants and many others, President Obama's inauguration was a special moment. Mants was on the front lines of the voting rights march and has worked for civil rights since his days with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. And while today was special, he says there's been a disconnect between the civil rights movement and some of the youth of today. He sat down with Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill recently to talk about that ...

Tuscaloosa, AL – Close to two million people are headed to the nation's capital to witness Barack Obama being sworn in. Among them is a group from west Alabama traveling by bus. Early Monday morning, Brandon Hollingsworth spoke with one of the group's leaders, Fran Viselli, as the bus approached Atlanta.

Tuscaloosa, AL – Close to two million people are headed to the nation's capital to witness Barack Obama being sworn in. Among them is a group from west Alabama traveling by bus. Early Monday morning, Brandon Hollingsworth spoke with one of the group's leaders, Fran Viselli, as the bus approached Atlanta.

Marion AL – Perry County has declared a new government holiday to honor the election of Barack Obama. Perry County lies in the Black Belt region, which is known for its rich soil and some of the nation's worst poverty. It also holds deep roots to the voting rights movement. And that still complicates life ... and perhaps Barack Obama Day. Brett Tannehill reports.

Northport AL – The presidential election drew a large turnout to polling sites across Alabama. At the Northport Civic Center and City Hall, voters waited as long as an hour to cast their ballot. Alabama Public Radio's Brett Tannehill reports ...

Tuscaloosa, AL – Four years ago in Birmingham, Joellyn Beckham and Gina Williams decided they couldn't possibly be alone in their liberal leanings. So they designed a simple sticker to express their views: a bright blue dot in a red square.

Today, the logos decorate vehicles in at least 44 states and they've even turned up on former presidential candidates Howard Dean and Wesley Clark. Pretty high goals for a sticker with humble roots in the Heart of Dixie.

Tuscaloosa AL – Our listening tour of Alabama's seven Congressional Districts continues. We've been hearing from likely voters about what issues are important to them this election season. Let's go to District Five, which contains Alabama's northern-most counties ...

Tuscaloosa AL – APR has been visiting with voters in Alabama's seven Congressional Districts to find out what issues are important to them this election season. Now we head to District Four, which spans the north central portion of the state. We'll begin in a Pickens County T-Shirt printing shop ... with more thoughts about the economy and it's relationship to energy ...

Tuscaloosa AL – APR News is taking you to the state's seven Congressional Districts to hear the issues important to some of Alabama's voters. Next, our tour visits District Three, which includes counties in east central Alabama. Some residents are concerned about their local economies ...

Tuscaloosa AL – Alabama Public Radio has been bringing you the thoughts of voters from across Alabama's seven Congressional Districts. Our series concludes in District Seven, which includes the southern half of Tuscaloosa County, and other west central Alabama areas. We'll start by visiting a couple of Tuscaloosa-area barbershops ...

Tuscaloosa AL – Alabama Public Radio has been talking with dozens of voters across the state's seven Congressional Districts. This week we've been hearing some of their thoughts. District Six includes the northern half of Tuscaloosa County and other communities in central Alabama. We'll begin on Main Ave. in historic downtown Northport ...

Tuscaloosa, AL – With the presidential election quickly approaching, Alabama Public Radio was curious of student opinion about the accessibility of voting. Voting accessibility seems to be an issue for young voters. Chelsea Banks reports.

Tuscaloosa, AL – Alabama Public Radio has produced several reports about young and first time voters in the 2008 election. Reporter Erin Williams tracked down several students at the University of Alabama to find out what they've been thinking about.

Tuscaloosa, AL – Historically, Christianity has played an important role in Southern social and political life. However, this emphasis can overshadow the contributions of other religious communities. Reporter Hannah Dame reports.

Tuscaloosa, AL – There's no doubt that Alaska Governor Sarah Palin energized the Republican Party when she was chosen as John McCain's running mate. If the GOP wins next week, she would become the first female vice president in U-S history. Reporter Rett Hawk recently asked some young women about their thoughts on Palin's pick.

Tuscaloosa, AL – The Internet isn't just for the kids anymore. As Alabama Public Radio's Jordan Culberson explains, this election has seen the Internet become a powerful news source that can make or break political campaigns.

Tuscaloosa, AL – Hope for change. That's been the message Senator Barack Obama has been preaching since his campaign for the presidency began. Despite an overwhelming Republican presence in the state of Alabama, Obama supporters still carry on their struggle for voters. Alabama Public Radio's Daniel Cherry tells us more about the battle for Alabama.

Tuscaloosa, AL – The 2008 presidential election has given rise to some heated feelings and discussions. Alabama Public Radio's Martha Jean Schindler visited the Ferguson Center at the University of Alabama to ask students how they felt about the negativity surrounding this election.

Tuscaloosa, AL – With African American voter turnout expected to be at record numbers for this presidential election, the question of how much black voter turnout will impact the election looms large. Alabama Public Radio's Alisa Beckwith-Ayilliath decided to visit African American barbershops to find out from voters how big of a role Barack Obama's race plays in getting blacks to the polls.

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