Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

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George Clooney says he hates raising money for politics.

But after hosting two big-ticket fundraisers with his wife, Amal, that reportedly raised $15 million in support of Hillary Clinton this weekend, Clooney is defending that haul by drawing attention to a big difference in how the former secretary of state and her rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, are bringing in cash.

It has been nearly a year since the death of Freddie Gray, the Baltimore man whose death in police custody set off days of street protests that turned violent. Since then, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, the city's mayor, decided against a re-election bid, leaving a vacancy that's drawn more than a dozen Democrat candidates.

Among them is DeRay Mckesson, perhaps the most visible member of the Black Lives Matter movement. Since leaving a high-profile education job, Mckesson has amassed hundreds of thousands of loyal Twitter followers attracted to his brand of activism.

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Trump Leads GOP Ahead Of N.Y. Primary

Apr 17, 2016
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Ahead of Tuesday's primary in New York, the presidential candidates have been clocking time upstate, where a lot of small towns have been gutted by the loss of manufacturing jobs in recent years. On this issue, the candidates are united.

Hillary Clinton has vowed to "fight for more help" in upstate New York if she wins the nomination, and Ted Cruz has called to bring manufacturing jobs "back from China and Mexico."

One of those towns is Massena, where big plant closures have meant residents either reinvent themselves, or move.

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Leroy Robinson Jr. owns a barbershop in West Philadelphia. He's been doing this work for 40 years — and he says the trade runs in the family.

"My father's a barber, my brother is a barber and here I am," he says.

His favorite part of the job is talking to his customers about, well, nearly everything.

"Right now, the political thing is on the horizon," Robinson says, "But the biggest thing right now is Villanova."

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 North Country Public Radio. To see more, visit North Country Public Radio.

During an exchange over how high to raise the minimum wage in Thursday night's Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders began to shout over each other, hands raised, fingers pointed, both seeming to get a bit red in the face, while the audience cheered and booed in equal parts.

It was quite a scene. As NPR's Ron Elving put it, "Both Sanders and Clinton showed flashes of animosity bordering on contempt."

One of the biggest stories of the election cycle is turnout (as we've reported a few times now): Republican turnout has spiked far beyond 2012 levels, and Democratic turnout has fallen off after the party's mammoth 2008.

The tone and the turnout are vastly different between Republicans and Democrats this year, but oddly enough, both sides have something crucial in common: their voters are far less moderate than they were in their last primaries.

It's essentially impossible to win the Democratic nomination without support from women.

In primaries and caucuses across the country, women make up a solid majority of the Democratic electorate. In fact, according to exit poll data, there's not a state that's voted to date where women made up less than 54 percent of Democratic voters. And, in Mississippi, women made up nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of Democratic primary voters.

President Obama is throwing his weight behind a plan that would lead to competition in the market for set-top cable and satellite TV boxes. Most viewers now rent the boxes from their TV providers. The Federal Communications Commission wants to make it easier for viewers to buy the devices.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump has based his presidential campaign on resentment toward the establishment, and some alarmed Republicans have called for national leaders to take Trump down.

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Bernie-mania hit Vatican City today with a crush of Italian media, cameras, boom microphones, shouting reporters and a ring of civilians, smartphones held aloft, chanting "Bernie, Bernie, Bernie!"

Sanders was not there to meet with Pope Francis, who is on the road himself visiting a refugee camp in Greece. The Democratic hopeful had accepted an invitation from the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences to speak at a conference on social and economic justice.

Donald Trump's Colorado supporters are gathering at the state capital Friday to make some noise about a political process they say has left them voiceless. The backlash from Trump's supporters has included thousands of voicemails and texts a day to the state Republican Party's chairman, some threatening, after his phone number was leaked online.

If Bernie Sanders surprises pollsters and confounds expectations in the New York primary on Tuesday, April 19, his backers and staff will trumpet the effect of his ninth debate with rival Hillary Clinton on the night of April 14.

They will say the relentlessly aggressive strategy Sanders pursued in the latest CNN debate, with its steady stream of attacks on Clinton, provided the defining moment in a long campaign for a nomination that remains up for grabs.

This story is part of an election-year project focused on how voters' needs of government are shaped by where they live. NPR will explore parts of the country not on the primary calendar and not crowded with journalists following each twist of campaign season. First up: Illinois, the state that most broadly represents America in terms of race, income, age, religion and education.

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"New York values" got a lot of love from Republicans in New York City on Thursday night.

All three Republican presidential hopefuls attended the New York State Republican Gala, a $1,000-a-plate fundraiser for the state GOP. It took place just days before New York's primary, which comes amid an unusually contentious campaign for the nomination.

Organizing for Action, the grass-roots network born from the Obama campaigns, is now deep in the battle over confirming the president's nominee to the Supreme Court. These days, OFA is a nonprofit that organizes on progressive issues and trains future grass-roots gurus.

"You know this is very much an organization that is led by people out in their communities who care about the issues of the day," said Buffy Wicks, a member of OFA's board of advisers and a veteran of Obama's two presidential campaigns and his White House.

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