Politics & Government

It's All Politics
10:57 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Town Hall Format Could Make Things Tough On Obama

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 1:46 pm

It was Bill Clinton who made the town hall-style debate famous, and looking back to his performance in the first such fall faceoff in 1992, it's easy to see why.

Clinton commanded the stage and used the format — in which voters, not journalists, ask the questions — to "feel the pain" of the audience. Now, President Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney get a shot at the same format.

However, it's the president who comes at it from a distinct disadvantage, says Chris Arterton, a professor of political management at George Washington University.

Read more
Election 2012
10:56 am
Tue October 16, 2012

The Tea Party: Cooled Down, Or As Strong As Ever?

The Tea Party may have took the 2010 midterm elections by storm, but many analysts are now asking if the party's influence has cooled off. Host Michel Martin looks at the Tea Party's prospects for this election with NPR's Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and Shelby Blakely, journalist coordinator for the Tea Party Patriots.

Economy
10:30 am
Tue October 16, 2012

5 Questions 'Real' People Might Ask At The Debate

An audience member holds up his hand at a Mitt Romney town hall meeting in Dayton, Ohio, in March. Audience members will be allowed to ask questions at the second presidential debate, being held Tuesday night in Hempstead, N.Y.
Gerald Herbert AP

As this election year began, political pundits insisted the No. 1 issue would be the economy. They expected the candidates to offer voters detailed plans for encouraging job growth.

Now, with the election just three weeks away, many Americans are still scratching their heads, wondering what exactly President Obama and former Gov. Mitt Romney would do to improve the economy.

Read more
Politics & Government
9:18 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Northport City Council: No Open Carrying of Guns

Under an ordinance passed by the city council, people won't be allowed to openly carry guns on city property in Northport.

The Tuscaloosa News reports (http://bit.ly/R2rS2Z ) the city council passed the ordinance Monday. Northport City Administrator Scott Collins says anyone who enters a city-owned building or part with a gun openly displayed will be asked to leave.

It is legal to openly carry a firearm in Alabama.

Read more
Politics & Government
9:15 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Groundbreaking Set for Freedom Riders Park

1961 attack on Freedom Riders.
encyclopediaofalabama.org

Work is set to begin on a park in memory of a brutal attack on civil rights activists 51 years ago and the progress made since then.

The Anniston Star reports (http://bit.ly/S1aUlq ) that the groundbreaking for Freedom Riders Park is set for 10 a.m. Thursday.

Read more
Monkey See
6:34 am
Tue October 16, 2012

A Judge Dismisses 'The Bachelor' Discrimination Lawsuit, But Not Its Concerns

Seen here in April 2012, Christopher Johnson and Nathaniel Claybrooks sued over the casting of The Bachelor.
Mark Humphrey AP

Yesterday, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by Christopher Johnson and Nathaniel Claybrooks, two black men who had auditioned for The Bachelor, who claimed that the show discriminates against people of color both in choosing the primary bachelor/ette and in choosing the people he or she will have to choose from.

Read more
Middle East
2:03 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Turks Fear What Syria's War Will Bring

Turkish soldiers stand near the Turkey-Syria border in Akcakale, Turkey, early Friday.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 7:16 pm

In Turkey's southern Hatay province, it is harvest time — the second harvest since the uprising began in neighboring Syria.

In the village of Hacipasa, Turkey, located right along the Syrian border, children play alongside tents on the edge of the farm fields. The tents belong not to Syrian refugees, but to Turkish farmworkers helping to bring in the cotton, tomatoes, peppers and pomegranates waiting to be harvested.

Read more
Latin America
2:01 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Cuban Missile Crisis Passes Quietly, 50 Years Later

Cuban President Fidel Castro replies to President Kennedy's naval blockade via Cuban radio and television on October 23, 1962. Kennedy enacted the blockade in response to the deployment of Soviet nuclear weapons in Cuba.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

The small town of Bejucal, 20 miles south of Havana, looks much as it did in October 1962. Horse carts carry passengers and fresh-cut green bananas through narrow streets lined with pastel-colored homes.

The sleepy town doesn't seem like the kind of place to put an arsenal of nuclear weapons. But a military bunker here was the biggest storage depot on the island for the Soviet nuclear weapons 50 years ago.

Read more
State Employees Retirement
5:37 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Gov. Bentley Reveals Retirement Incentive Plan Details

Governor Bentley Bentley will ask legislators to pass a bill offering eligible state employees an incentive if they voluntarily retire.
State of Alabama

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley plans to ask legislators to pass a bill offering eligible state employees an incentive if they voluntarily retire.

The governor announced details of the plan at a news conference Monday in Huntsville. He said it would either pay 100 percent of monthly premiums for health insurance for five years or offer $15,000 in cash payments.

He said the program would help retiring workers while at the same time saving taxpayers between $18 million and $26 million a year.

Read more
Racist Language Amendment
5:10 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Voters Can Remove Language From Constitution

Alabama voters on Nov. 6 will get another chance to remove racist sections of the Alabama Constitution.
Khara Persad News 21

Alabama voters on Nov. 6 will get another chance to remove racist sections of the Alabama Constitution.

Amendment No. 4 on the ballot would remove language from the 1901 Alabama Constitution that includes providing for separate schools for black and white students and levying a poll tax.

Supporters say this amendment is different from one narrowly rejected by voters in 2004. That one removed the same sections, but also removed language that says there is no right to a public education at taxpayer's expense.

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:33 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Energy Perception And Policy Reality

Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 12:13 pm

As the election nears, energy policy remains a regular topic on the campaign trail. Controversial subjects like arctic drilling and hydraulic fracturing continue making headlines as the political class debate our nation's changing energy mix. But let's not deceive ourselves, or the public at large, about a president's real role and reach.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Report: Probe Of Rep. Jesse Jackson Focuses On Use Of Campaign Funds

Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr., D-Ill., on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in December 2011.
Yuri Gripas Reuters /Landov

The Chicago Sun-Times broke the news late last week that Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., is "the target of a federal investigation into 'suspicious activity' into his congressional finances."

Read more
It's All Politics
11:33 am
Mon October 15, 2012

The Not-So-Great Communicator: Is Obama Overrated As A Speaker?

President Obama speaks to supporters last month during a campaign stop in Las Vegas.
Isaac Brekken Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:41 am

For a man who was elected president partly on his ability to give a great speech, Barack Obama has been at times a surprisingly poor communicator in office and on the campaign trail.

That may have been most evident earlier this month during the first presidential debate. But Obama generally hasn't been as impressive at getting his message across in his four years in the White House as he was during the campaign that put him there.

Read more
Politics
10:53 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Chicano Activist Sees Dream Live On In Her Sons

Rosie Castro was a Mexican-American civil rights activist during the 1970s. She passed down her passion for change to her children: Texas State Representative Joaquin Castro and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro. For Hispanic Heritage Month, Rosie Castro speaks with host Michel Martin about the Chicano movement and raising her twin sons.

Around the Nation
10:53 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Finding Documents After Years Living Under Radar

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And speaking of dreams, the Obama Administration says its high profile immigration initiative is intended to preserve the dreams of a large group of young immigrants. The program is called the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Initiative.

Read more

Pages