Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

Donald Trump did what Republicans have begged their presidential candidate to do for months — lay out the case, from A to Z, against Hillary Clinton.

Demanding action on gun control, about 30 Democratic members of the United States House of Representatives are staging a sit-in.

"Lawmakers are grouped in the well of the chamber, in front of the speaker's dais and in chairs in the front row," NPR's Sue Davis reports. "Some members are literally sitting on the floor of the House."

Report: Partisan Bad Blood Highest In Decades

Jun 22, 2016

This election has been ugly.

Outside a Donald Trump rally a few weeks ago in New Mexico, anti-Trump protesters threw plastic bottles and burning t-shirts at police.

Donald J. Trump, the Republicans' presumptive nominee for the White House, attacked his primary rival Hillary Clinton on Wednesday as "a world-class liar" who allegedly used her government power to pad her bank account and reward special interests.

"Hillary Clinton may be the most corrupt person ever to seek the presidency," Trump declared in a speech from New York, as he sought to change the subject after a string of bad news about his campaign's fundraising prowess and personnel moves by pointing the finger at Clinton's long record.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has changed his mind and will indeed run for re-election to the U.S. Senate.

It's a big departure for the former presidential candidate, who had repeatedly maintained that there was no "Plan B" if his campaign for the presidency did not work out. Even after withdrawing from the White House contest in March, Rubio continued to insist he was not going to run again and even mocked such insinuations that he would reverse course.

But on Wednesday, Rubio did just that. In a statement, he admitted it was a puzzling turn of course.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Most Donald Trump events kick off with music from Elton John or the Rolling Stones at deafening volumes. But praise choruses ruled the day Tuesday as hundreds of conservative Christians gathered at a hotel in Times Square to question Trump.

Under glittering pink-and-white chandeliers, evangelicals and conservative Catholics filled the large ballroom, some raising their hands and closing their eyes as they sang, "Seek ye first the Kingdom of God/And his righteousness/And all these things shall be added unto you."

This story was originally posted on the website of member station WNYC:

Ever since New York state's presidential primary in April, officials from the city Board of Elections have been trying to explain what led to two illegal voter purges that removed more than 120,000 voters from the rolls.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Abortion is one of the more common procedures performed in the U.S., more common even than appendectomy. But as clinics in Texas close, finding a place in the state where medical residents training to be OB-GYNs can learn to do abortions is getting harder.

U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah Sr. of Pennsylvania was found guilty today of multiple counts of racketeering, fraud and money laundering in a case involving his unsuccessful 2007 bid to become mayor of Philadelphia.

The Democratic congressman reacted to the verdict with little more than a smile as he consulted with his attorneys, The Associated Press reported.

Donald Trump's latest fundraising figures are eye-popping.

No, not because they're great. Rather, they're abysmal. The fundraising gap between Trump and Hillary Clinton is the biggest disparity to kick off a campaign in recent history, as the New York Times reported.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the runup to this election season, The Party Decides seemed to be on every political science nerd's reading list.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Things are not going well for Donald Trump.

On Monday, he fired his campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski. Lewandowski ran the campaign on a shoestring budget and a strategy that was largely built off and fueled by the candidate's say-whatever personality and brand.

His poll numbers are sinking. His TV blitz is nowhere to be seen. Big donors aren't flocking to him.

And if Donald Trump needed more tangible evidence of problems in his campaign, it's in reports filed Monday at the Federal Election Commission.

A man who was arrested at a Donald Trump rally in Las Vegas on Saturday after reportedly trying to grab a police officer's gun intended to "shoot and kill" the Republican presidential nominee, according to court documents released on Monday.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET:

The Justice Department and FBI have now released the full transcript of Orlando shooter Omar Mateen's 911 call, which includes his naming the Islamic State and leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. In a joint statement, the agencies said they had withheld the names because they "did not want to provide the killer or terrorist organizations with a publicity platform for hateful propaganda" but decided to do so after the issue had become a "distraction" to the investigation.

Original post follows:

Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET with Senate votes

To virtually no one's surprise, the Senate failed to advance any of the four gun control proposals — two offered by Democrats, and two by Republicans — that came in response to last week's mass shooting in Orlando, Fla.

Here are the results:

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