Politics & Government

The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

After DOMA: What's Next For Gay Married Couples

Edith Windsor is mobbed by journalists and supporters as she leaves the Supreme Court on March 27, when the court heard oral arguments in the case that challenged the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:47 pm

The Supreme Court's 5-4 decision Wednesday to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act is a monumental victory for advocates of same-sex marriage.

But what happens now that the 1996 federal law that confines marriage to a man and a woman has been declared unconstitutional?

Will federal benefits flow only to same-sex married couples living in states that recognize their unions?

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Law
9:51 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Read The Rulings: Inside The Same-Sex Marriage Decisions

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:22 am

Matt Stiles is data editor on NPR's News Applications team. Follow him on Twitter at @stiles. Erica Ryan (@ericalryan) is a digital news editor.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics & Government
8:21 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Ala Democratic Leaders Bash Supreme Court Ruling

The Supreme Court is setting aside the part of the Voting Rights Act that requires federal approval for changes to election practices in the South.
www.cnn.com

Two estranged leaders of Alabama's Democratic Party are united in their criticism of a Supreme Court decision on voting rights.

   Both Alabama Democratic Conference leader Joe Reed and former party chairman Mark Kennedy say they'll do what they can to fight the decision released Tuesday.

   A majority of the justices sided with Republican-controlled Shelby County in ruling that a key part of the 1965 law can't be enforced without new congressional action.

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Politics & Government
7:34 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Gulf Shores to Conduct Impact Study on Festival

Gulf Shores is approving a $12,500 study to gauge the impact of the Hangout Music Festival.
http://wfpk.org

City leaders in Gulf Shores have voted to conduct a study to gauge the economic impact of the Hangout Music Festival.

   WALA-TV reports (http://bit.ly/14VPM6v ) the mayor and city council voted unanimously Monday night to spend $12,500 on a six-week study that will compare the cost of hosting the event with lodging and sales tax revenue the festival generates.

   The city has hosted the three-day, beachfront festival for four years and officials say they want an independent examination of its impact on the city.

Politics
4:46 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Senate Bill Would Do Away With Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. In the midst of the housing crisis in 2008, the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were brought into government hands. And today, over 90 percent of mortgages are guaranteed by the U.S. government. That's a potential burden for taxpayers if mortgages fail. Yesterday, a bipartisan Senate bill was introduced to try to unwind the government takeover, as well as Fannie and Freddie. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.

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Environment
4:42 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Coal Industry Concerned By Obama's Climate Change Plans

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And before leaving on his trip to Africa, President Obama had some other words on another subject. He announced a wide-ranging plan to address climate change. Rather than taking that plan to Congress and fighting it out, Obama is using his executive powers to implement it without new laws. The president wants the Environmental Protection Agency to restrict carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants. The biggest source of those emissions is coal-fired facilities.

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Africa
4:40 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Obama's Africa Trip To Focus On Democracy, Investment

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

President Obama flew home from Europe less than a week ago, and this morning, he is headed back overseas. This time, Air Force One is bound for Africa. It's a weeklong journey that will take the president and his family to three countries covering vastly different regions. This is Obama's first extended trip to the continent as president.

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Around the Nation
4:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

After 11 Hours, Texas State Senator's Filibuster Fails

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 10:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This was the scene last night in the Texas Capitol building.

(APPLAUSE)

MONTAGNE: Crowds who came out to support a nearly 11-hour filibuster by Democratic State Senator Wendy Davis erupted in screams in an attempt to stop a vote on a bill that would have forced all but a handful of abortion clinics in Texas to close. That's because, among other things, the bill would require clinics be upgraded to ambulatory surgical centers, something that the clinics say they can't afford.

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The Two-Way
3:24 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Clock Runs Out On Controversial Texas Abortion Bill

The Texas Capitol rotunda filled with supporters of state Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, who filibustered a controversial abortion bill.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 6:38 am

The official clock ran out on Texas lawmakers overnight, which effectively killed a bill that would have dramatically restricted abortion in the nation's second most populous state. Hours of chaos and confusion in Austin finally lifted as Texas Senate leaders decided that the vote on Senate Bill 5 did not clear a constitutionally-mandated hurdle that it pass before midnight.

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The Two-Way
12:59 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Texas Lawmaker's 11-Hour Filibuster Ended On A Technicality

State Sen. Wendy Davis, a Fort Worth Democrat, dons pink tennis shoes during a Tuesday filibuster.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 9:42 am

By midnight Texas time, it was all over but the parliamentary inquiries. After a nearly 11-hour filibuster attempt by state Sen. Wendy Davis to block sweeping restrictions on abortion, the Republican-dominated Texas Senate successfully shut down the filibuster on points of order. (See update at the bottom of this post.)

"This is probably the worst night that I've experienced since I've been in the Senate, maybe since I've been in public life," said state Sen. Kirk Watson, a Democrat from Austin.

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Politics & Government
5:03 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Ala. County At Heart Of Voting Rights Case Pleased

The nation's highest court set aside a part of the Voting Rights Act that requires federal approval for changes to election practices in the South and some other areas.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

The Alabama county at the center of the Supreme Court's decision on voting rights is praising the decision.

Shelby County attorney Butch Ellis says the ruling Tuesday will save local and state governments time and money without hurting the cause of voting equality.

Ellis says he's "elated" with the ruling, in which the court said a key part of the law is invalid until it's updated by Congress.

The justices set aside a part of the landmark law that requires federal approval for changes to election practices in the South and some other areas.

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Politics
3:47 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Rep. Goodlatte: Immigration Reform Needs To Be Bipartisan

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 5:05 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Here to talk more about immigration from the House point of view is Virginia Congressman Bob Goodlatte, a Republican and chair of the House Judiciary Committee. Welcome to the program.

REPRESENTATIVE BOB GOODLATTE: Good to be with you and your listeners, Audie.

CORNISH: Now, do any of these provisions from the Senate make the proposal any more palatable to Republicans in the House?

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Law
1:56 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

What Changes After Supreme Court Ruling On Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. This morning in a much anticipated decision, the Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Writing for a five-four majority, Chief Justice John Roberts ruled that Congress' action to protect minority voting rights in nine states was based on outdated data, and the formula used to determine which areas were subject to federal oversight was thus unconstitutional.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:24 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Is Cutting The Pentagon's Budget A Gift To Our Enemies?

Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 12:48 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Amid the across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration and a general belt-tightening mood among many on Capitol Hill, the Pentagon is being asked to reduce its spending after a decade of increases.

Some argue that even with cutbacks, the U.S. spends far more than other countries on defense, and that the drones and special operations forces increasingly being used in the counterterrorism fight cost less than conventional military operations.

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Politics
10:57 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Immigration Bill 'Disadvantages Women?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we are going to take a look at a sensitive topic. We are going to talk about infidelity. Sure, we talk about it when a politician or a celebrity gets caught, but what about friends, neighbors, ourselves? Hundreds of listeners have been sending in their stories. We'll hear some of them and new research about this topic. That's later in the program.

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