Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

Mark Zuckerberg says the notion that fake news influenced the U.S. presidential election is "a pretty crazy idea."

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I'm Ari Shapiro. Big changes today to Donald Trump's transition team - and here to talk with us about it - NPR's Scott Detrow. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

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When Donald Trump did talk about coal during the campaign, he often referred to it as clean coal.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DONALD TRUMP: We're going to go clean coal. And that technology is working. I hear it works, so.

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After nearly two years of running for president, on Thursday, Hillary Clinton went for a hike near her home in Chappaqua, N.Y. It was a quiet moment after a devastating loss that likely marked the end of her political career.

Over four decades of public life, Clinton has always been a disruptive presence, who went places and did things that haven't been done before — at least not by women.

Pull out your blue pencils, green eyeshades and rule books; it may soon be time to start rewriting NAFTA.

Leaders in the United States, Canada and Mexico say they're open to giving the North American Free Trade Agreement, in place since 1994, a hard look.

Here's what's been happening:

President-elect Trump is shaking up the leadership of his transition team, naming Vice President-elect Mike Pence as chairman. Pence will take over the role from New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who was named as a vice chairman of the team's executive committee.

Pence, Indiana's governor and a former congressman, brings some Washington expertise and has long-standing relationships with congressional leaders such as House Speaker Paul Ryan.

When Donald Trump finally has his feet under the desk in the Oval Office and opens the files marked "Afghanistan" and "Pakistan," he will find much to worry about.

Relations between Pakistan and India, which both have big nuclear arsenals, are in crisis. These days, their armies regularly trade shots along the Line of Control, the de facto border in disputed Kashmir — sometimes with fatal consequences.

Fears abound that Afghanistan could melt down into violent chaos that could spill beyond its boundaries.

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In his presidential victory speech this week, Donald Trump picked up on a constant theme of his campaign.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

DONALD TRUMP: We will also finally take care of our great veterans...

(APPLAUSE)

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What Does Trump's Victory Mean For NATO?

Nov 11, 2016

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, which has ensured peace in Europe since the end of World War II, woke up Wednesday to what seemed like a nightmare: an incoming U.S. president who openly questions the value of the alliance.

During his campaign, Donald Trump repeatedly criticized NATO, calling the organization "obsolete." He also suggested that America might not defend fellow NATO countries that didn't help reimburse the U.S. for the cost of its troops and bases in Europe.

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Women across the country are rushing to get IUDs. Or at least, they're tweeting about rushing to get long-term birth control, according to a surge of messages on social media.

The election just ended and the new president doesn't even take office until Jan. 20. But the transition planning starts now.

Who's going to be President-elect Donald Trump's secretary of state? His chief of staff? His education secretary? Now that the news of Trump's election has settled, speculation over how the president-elect will fill out his administration has consumed Washington.

Keeping in mind the truism that nobody who knows is talking, and those who are talking don't really know, here are some of the names being floated, leaked and speculated about.

In 2016, the polls got it wrong. They failed to predict that Donald Trump was winning key battleground states. But a startup in San Francisco says it spotted it well in advance, not because of the "enthusiasm gap" — Republicans turning out and Democrats staying at home. Instead, the startup Brigade's data pointed to a big crossover effect: Democrats voting for Trump in droves.

The company built an app that asks a simple question: Which candidate are you going to vote for?

In late October, Donald Trump released an action plan for what he hopes to accomplish in his first 100 days in office. Below, NPR reporters and editors from the politics team and other coverage areas have annotated Trump's plan. We've added context on several of his proposals, including whether he can really repeal Obamacare and what a hiring freeze on the federal workforce would actually look like.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up more than 1 percent Thursday at an all-time high of 18,807.88, as investors bet that the Donald Trump presidency will mean less regulation and more potential stimulus spending.

During his presidential campaign, Republican Donald Trump said he would "get rid of" Dodd-Frank — the sweeping legislation passed in 2010 to address problems underlying the 2008-2009 financial crisis.

Many Republicans hate the 2,300-page law, saying it is layered with far too many regulations. But Democrats say it provides valuable oversight of an industry that they believe took too many risks on Wall Street and too much advantage of customers on Main Street.

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Throughout this election campaign, we've brought you stories of families divided by politics, and those divisions have only gotten more challenging.

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In Tuesday's election, millennials supported Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump, but they did not turn out in the same numbers that they did for President Barack Obama. We'll break the numbers down in just a moment.

Many police officers are warmly welcoming the election of Donald Trump, believing he'll defend against what many officers see as growing anti-police sentiment.

Trump was endorsed by the National Fraternal Order of Police, the largest organization of rank-and-file cops, and Executive Director Jim Pasco says that support was enthusiastic.

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