Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

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Updated at 8:31 p.m. ET

In the weeks since allegations of sexual harassment and assault against movie producer Harvey Weinstein became public, a number of other stories of abuse have come to light: in Hollywood, in newsrooms (including NPR's), and now, in statehouses across the country.

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A 5K To Highlight Gerrymandering

Nov 5, 2017

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A year ago Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton, and the surprises haven't stopped since.

He promised to be a transformational president, to "drain the swamp" and shake up the establishment.

And he promised that being president would change him — saying that he could become more "presidential" than anyone except Abraham Lincoln.

Last week in the Russia investigations: Mueller removes all doubt, the imbroglio apparently costs a man a government job and lots of talk — but no silver bullet — on digital interference.


Mueller time

How many more thunderbolts has Zeus in his quiver? Where might the next one strike? Who does the angry lightning-hurler have in his sights — and who will be spared?

President Trump kicked off his Asia tour Sunday with a warning that the U.S. will use its military might, if necessary, to fend off hostile threats.

"No one — no dictator, no regime and no nation — should underestimate, ever, American resolve," Trump told U.S. and Japanese troops, assembled inside a flag-draped aircraft hangar at the Yokota Air Base in Tokyo. "We will never yield, never waver and never falter in defense of our people, our freedom and our great American flag."


Valery Pozo still gets angry thinking about it. It was about a decade ago, and the immigrant communities in her hometown, Salt Lake City, were on edge because of recent immigration enforcement raids in the area. Pozo's mother, an immigrant from Peru, was on the sidelines at her son's soccer game when another parent asked whether she was "illegal."

"To me, that was clearly a racist question and a racist assumption," Pozo recalled.

But her mother saw it as a harmless comment, despite Pozo's best efforts to convince her that it was something bigger.

Turmoil In The Democratic Party

Nov 4, 2017

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Updated at 2:16 p.m. ET

The week started with "legal shock and awe," as Carrie Johnson, NPR's Justice correspondent described it on the PBS NewsHour.

It's hard to believe it was only Monday that indictments were handed down stemming from special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia.

There's no such thing as an off year in Virginia politics: it's one of two states, along with New Jersey, holding gubernatorial elections in 2017. Those races can serve as a testing ground for the political parties' messages ahead of the 2018 mid-terms.

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Sexual Harassment In The Country's Capitol

Nov 4, 2017

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What's Next In The Russia Investigation

Nov 4, 2017

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Breaking Down The Tax Bill

Nov 4, 2017

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This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the fourth postelection visit with Jamie Ruppert, 34, of White Haven, Pa.

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Helen Webster wanted to be involved in the school district in her small town of Kremmling, Colo.

"I just felt bad that they weren't going to have anyone run up here," she says.

So the retired teacher decided to run for a seat on the West Grand County school board. A current board member invited her to a meeting so she could get a sense of the workload.

As she sat through all the presentations detailing next year's budget needs, it dawned on her. "I thought 'oh my God, this is more than what I bit off, I don't know that I could do that,'" she laughs.

The National Archives released 553 new documents Friday related to the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

The Associated Press reports that the additional papers show that the CIA was working to gather information about a trip to Mexico City that Kennedy's assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, had made weeks before he shot the president.

Updated at 11:56 p.m. ET: NPR has obtained the full memo from a Democratic source. Read it at the bottom of this story.

What, exactly, did the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign agree to in 2015, before any votes had been cast in the Democratic primary?

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with political commentators Jonathan Capehart of The Washington Post and Ramesh Ponnuru, senior editor for The National Review and columnist for Bloomberg View, about the tax bill and Mueller's Russia investigation.

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President Trump is heading to Asia just as Republicans in Congress begin the hard work of trying to pass major tax legislation.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

The U.S. has pulled out of a pledge to conform to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, an international group that was formed to add transparency and accountability to how governments manage natural resources. The U.S. says it can't comply with all of the EITI's requirements.

A State Department spokesperson says the U.S. will remain as one of 17 "supporting countries" of the initiative. A U.S. representative also serves on the EITI's international board.

Friday News Roundup - International

Nov 3, 2017

A terror attack ended the lives of six international tourists who were visiting New York this week. The suspect, a 29-year-old man from Uzbekistan, is in custody and authorities are working to learn more about why he may have carried out this act of deadly violence.

Since the day he took office, President Trump's critics have been seeking more information about his company's lease to operate a hotel inside a taxpayer-owned building on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.

They have tried asking for records but have gotten nowhere.

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