Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

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Monica Nezzer, 22, is a full-time student studying psychology and biology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. She describes herself as "fortunate." But in addition to a full course load, she's working about 30 hours a week as a campus tour guide and recruitment specialist.

"At least once a semester, I face a time where I am like, 'I am broke. I am stressed. I am exhausted.' And I don't know how I'm going to make it through the rest of the semester," said Nezzer.

Hillary Clinton didn't just take aim at Donald Trump's national security policies in a major speech Thursday. She declared him unfit to negotiate with allies, command U.S. forces or be privy to the nuclear code.

"Americans aren't just electing a president in November — we're choosing our next commander in chief, a person we count on to decide questions of war and peace, life and death," Clinton said in San Diego. "It's not hard to imagine Donald Trump leading us into a war just because someone got under his very thin skin."

Hillary Clinton channeled a little bit of Donald Trump in San Diego on Thursday afternoon, delivering a blistering attack on her likely Republican opponent's qualifications to run the country.

"Making Donald Trump our commander in chief would be a historic mistake," Clinton told a cheering, and at times laughing, audience.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to a group of 65-year-old voters as part of a radio series where he explores the generational differences between how 25, 45 and 65-year-olds think about politics. He finds that this group of 65-year-olds were born into a structured world, which, for many, resembled The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. But later, their outlook was rocked by a series of assassinations of political figures, anti-war and civil rights protests.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

House Speaker Paul Ryan is ending his delicate dance around his party's presumptive presidential nominee, writing in an op-ed that he will vote for Donald Trump this fall.

The Wisconsin Republican has voiced reservations over Trump's tone throughout the campaign and disagrees with him on many policy areas. Last month, he met with the likely GOP nominee and withheld his endorsement. As recent as last week, he was still holding out.

Picture this. An email pops into your inbox. It promises to help you "make some real money and live the kind of life that you thought was only for 'rich' people." To help you "spend your life living it your way."

The pitch sounds promising, because it's December 2008, and the economy has collapsed all around you.

Most people don't know who Donald Verrilli is, but when major cases are argued before the U.S. Supreme Court, Verrilli is the man who represents the U.S. government. He is the seventh longest serving solicitor general in American history, having been in the position for five years, and now, he is stepping down.

President Obama announced Verrilli's imminent departure on Thursday, calling him "a dedicated public servant who has helped our nation live up to its promise of liberty and justice for all."

The aging screen siren in Sunset Boulevard flares up in anger when someone tells her she "used to be big."

"I'm still big," she fires back, "it's the pictures that got small."

It's been a bit like that for the California primary (which, this year, will be held June 7). Once the grand dame in the nominating season finale, California hasn't basked in the national nominating spotlight for decades.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bills that add gender identity to the protections for people using restrooms and other public accommodations have now been approved by both houses of the Massachusetts Legislature, in what's being hailed as a victory for LGBT rights activists.

The House approved its version of the bill Wednesday by a vote of 116-36; the Senate endorsed a similar bill last month, 33-4. The legislation will now go to a conference committee to resolve differences between the two versions.

In January 2009, as the U.S. economy was freezing up, employers were cutting roughly 800,000 jobs that month.

President Obama had just taken office and a few weeks later, he headed to Elkhart, Ind., where the unemployment rate was surging to 19 percent.

The key problem: Most jobs there were tied to the production of recreational vehicles. In the depths of the Great Recession, few Americans were buying expensive RVs.

Trump University was no university the way most people think of one.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to a group of 45-year-old voters who experienced a swell of patriotism and American exceptionalism in their youth. But patriotic fervor dwindled, as scandals and the emergence of 24/7 news coverage changed the game of politics.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

If D.C.'s builders put parlors into overpriced luxury apartments and condos — and, we guess, if people played games in them — the city's current favorite parlor game would be figuring out who likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump would pick for their running mates.

Attacks on the press carry a long and distinguished lineage in the rhetoric of American political campaigns.

Donald Trump, however, is a natural, a true once-in-a-generation talent. Even though he relies on media exposure more than most to make his case, Trump appears intent on further degrading a press already undermined by changes to the industry and a steep drop in public esteem.

Backed into a corner over questions about his efforts to raise money for veterans groups, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee on Tuesday came out swinging at a press conference.

While some of Washington's most prominent Republican leaders are still struggling over whether to endorse Donald Trump, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made the call to do so last month — as soon as Trump became the likely nominee.

A federal judge released hundreds of pages of court documents Tuesday related to Trump University, Donald Trump's real estate and investment training venture that has sparked lawsuits from former students. The records include a careful guide to selling — and to dealing with reporters.

The documents were released in response to a request from The Washington Post. After their release today, the newspaper's Tom Hamburger took a break from looking through the records to describe them to NPR's Ari Shapiro.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to a group of 25-year-old voters as part of a radio series exploring the generational differences between how 25, 45 and 65-year-olds think about politics. Having stood witness to the Bill Clinton-Monica Lewinsky scandal, the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, two wars, and an economic crash from a very young age, this group of 25-year-olds has seen a country going through hard times for most of their lives.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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