Politics & Government

Politics, elections, law, military and veteran's affairs

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Glenn Beck, the radio host who's founder of TheBlaze, has been an outspoken critic of Donald Trump's campaign during the election season. Glenn Beck joins us once again. Mr. Beck, thanks for being back with us. GLENN BECK: You bet. SIMON: What's your reaction so far to what you see going on in the transition in Washington, D.C.? BECK: I've actually been trying not to pay attention to it as much as I can. I am...

The most contentious presidential campaign and election in memory has many people dreading the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday. Some have even canceled plans , unwilling to face family members on the other side of the country's hardening political divide. Not so for the McNeish family of Roanoke, Va., though they still differ mightily on what to expect from a President Trump over the next four years. "I have no faith in him whatsoever," says Danny, 35, who works with a company that supplies and...

Donald Trump may be taking the old adage of keeping friends close and enemies closer to heart. The president-elect met 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney in Bedminster, N.J. on Saturday, and after the meeting the two emerged with signals it had gone well. "We had a far reaching conversation with regards to the various theaters in the world where there are interests of the United States of real significance," Romney told the press assembled outside Trump's golf course. "We discussed...

Here's a succinct analysis of last week's presidential vote: "Trump understands the new ecosystem, in which facts and truth don't matter. You attract attention, rouse emotions, and then move on." Those are the words of President Barack Obama, quoted by David Remnick — the editor of The N ew Yorker — in Remnick's forthcoming article, "IT HAPPENED HERE: A President confronts an election that changes everything — and threatens his legacy." The article is based on Remnick's conversations with...

President-elect Trump's selection of Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama to be attorney general is stirring old memories-about his first failed foray on the national political scene. In 1986, the Senate Judiciary Committee rejected Sessions, nominated by Republican President Reagan to be a a federal judge, after he acknowledged making racially insensitive remarks and calling the NAACP, the ACLU, the Southern Christian Leadership Council, and the National Council of Churches "un-American." It was...

The possibility that Donald Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, could fill a senior position in the White House raises thorny legal questions – one of which is whether it would run afoul of a federal anti-nepotism statute. Kushner was a close adviser to Trump throughout his campaign, but to officially employ Kushner in the White House would mean navigating the ambiguities surrounding the five-decades-old law. Congress passed the anti-nepotism law in 1967. It's widely perceived that the...

Yep. President-elect Donald J. Trump. That's still a thing. So while you continue to process that, we wanted to catch you up on some of some things you ought to read, hear and watch around the world of race and culture. And — good news — not all of it is election-related. (Okay a lot, but not all.) So. The Post-Election Hangover Continues (pass the Alka-Seltzer) Never mind trying to understand the mindset of victors in last week's election, says Baratunde Thurston in a (long-but-worth-it) Vox...

Despite reports of disarray on President-elect Donald Trump's transition team, it doesn't appear to have slowed the process of filling key positions. Trump has announced his picks for chief of staff, national security adviser, and his first cabinet secretary as fast or faster than many of his recent predecessors. Trump selected RNC chairman Reince Priebus as chief of staff just five days after winning election. Of the last five presidents, only Barack Obama acted more quickly. George H.W....

Between now and Inauguration Day, President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team have a tall order — filling approximately 4,000 jobs in the federal government that are held by political appointees. Below is an index of the people appointed to Cabinet positions, key White House staff roles and lead positions at other prominent government agencies. (This chart was last updated on Dec. 8.) Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Jeff Sessions of Alabama was the first Republican senator to get behind the-then renegade candidate Trump. Now, he is President-elect Donald Trump's pick for attorney general — and his hard-line stance on immigration and 30-year-old allegations of racism are sure to draw scrutiny in confirmation hearings. Long before Trump was winning primaries, or picking up political endorsements, he had a conservative ally in the Deep South. "We have a man here who really helped me," Trump said about...

A $25 million settlement agreement has been reached in the civil fraud lawsuits against President-elect Donald Trump and Trump University, according to New York's state attorney general. Eric Schneiderman called the settlement "a stunning reversal by Donald Trump and a major victory for the over 6,000 victims of his fraudulent university" in a written statement . The allegations have been a major point of controversy for the President-elect for years. "Donald Trump fought us every step of the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: The Trump administration named three top positions today. We'll hear more about Trump's choice for attorney general in a moment. For national security adviser, the president-elect chose Lieutenant General Michael Flynn who was fired by President Obama from his post as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. And Kansas Republican Congressman Mike Pompeo will direct the Central Intelligence Agency. NPR's David...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: People protesting against President-elect Donald Trump were still out in the streets around the country this week. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED CROWD #1: (Chanting) Hey-hey, ho-ho, Donald Trump has to got to go. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED CROWD #2: (Chanting) No Trump, no KKK, no fascist U.S.A. SIEGEL: That's chanting from demonstrators in Ypsilanti, Mich., and West Lafayette...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: We're going to take a few minutes to hear your reactions to an interview on yesterday's show. That interview was with a man named Richard Spencer. He's a leader of the so-called alt-right. That is a white nationalist movement known for promoting racism, anti-Semitism and misogyny. We talked to him because this group has growing influence. The chief strategist in Donald Trump's upcoming administration, Steve...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Liel Leibovitz's grandfather Siegfried moved from a village in Romania to the city of Vienna in the 1930s to go to music conservatory. He spent time in the city's famous coffee shops with people like Sigmund Freud. And then one day, he left. LIEL LEIBOVITZ: At some point in the very early on in the Nazi uprising, he just turned to his friends and said I'm leaving. I'm taking my two young sisters and I'm going to...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Well, now let's take a step back and hear about the direction national security might take in the Trump administration. I'm joined by David Rothkopf, who's CEO and editor of Foreign Policy magazine. Welcome to the program. DAVID ROTHKOPF: My pleasure. SIEGEL: What do these appointments say to you about Donald Trump's approach to foreign policy? ROTHKOPF: I think you're going to get a foreign policy that looks and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: One of Donald Trump's closest advisers is his son-in-law Jared Kushner. And there have been reports that Kushner is under consideration for a top White House job, though no actual announcement has been made. If Kushner does take a role in the Trump administration, it could run afoul of the federal anti-nepotism statute. And with us to talk about these rules is NPR's Ailsa Chang. Hi. AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: Hi....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: The auto industry found a friend, a scold and a tough disciplinarian in President Obama, but they don't know what they'll find in a President Trump. Reporting from the Los Angeles Auto Show, NPR's Sonari Glinton takes the temperature of the car business. SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Last night, President-elect Donald Trump tweeted (reading) just got a call from my friend Bill Ford, chairman of Ford, who advised me...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: During the presidential campaign, Republicans in Congress were some of Donald Trump's toughest critics. But his victory has changed the calculus on Capitol Hill. Those same critics now say they stand ready to work alongside the Trump administration. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has more. SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: Back in February, South Carolina Republican Senator Lindsey Graham spoke of his fierce...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnW3xkHxIEQ Three days after winning the presidency in 2008, President-elect Barack Obama held a press conference, taking questions from reporters. Three days after winning the presidency in 2016, President-elect Donald Trump turned to Twitter. An unprecedented feature of Donald Trump's successful campaign for president was his personal use of Twitter and it has continued as Trump meets with advisers and potential members of his cabinet. If this continues into...

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air . DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST: This is FRESH AIR. Another National Book Award winner this week is John Lewis, the longtime civil rights leader and Georgia congressman. His book called "March: Book 3," co-written with Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell, won in the category of young people's literature. It's a graphic novel dramatizing the now-famous voting-rights march from Selma to Montgomery for which Lewis was one of the leaders....

Food works better than Valium, I'm famous for telling my eating-disordered clients. Cookies and milk are comforting. A bowl of ice cream eases stress like nothing else. But as comforting as food can be, if it's the only thing that helps you manage your mood, you're at greater risk for more serious mental health problems, from anxiety and depression to body dissatisfaction and eating disorders. Instead of relying exclusively on food to manage mood, I encourage clients to practice meditation,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's learn some more about people who have been offered posts in the administration of President-elect Donald Trump. Retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn is Trump's choice for national security adviser, we have confirmed. Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions is the choice for attorney general of the United States and a congressman from Kansas, Mike Pompeo, is the choice for CIA director. Let's begin with NPR's...

Michael Flynn, Donald Trump's planned choice for National Security Adviser, is perhaps best known to the American public for his fiery speech at the Republican National Convention in the summer, when he spoke to chants of "lock her up," a reference to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton — and joined in himself. It was a strange position for someone who was a career military officer and a registered Democrat from Rhode Island. Within military circles, Flynn was a highly respected —...

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET President-elect Donald Trump announced his selections today for three key posts: Michael Flynn for national security adviser, Sen. Jeff Sessions for attorney general and Rep. Mike Pompeo for CIA director. Trump's selections signal that he is prioritizing loyalty as he chooses nominees for top posts — turning to people who were early and outspoken supporters of his campaign. Sessions is a former U.S. attorney and current senator with lengthy experience with the Justice...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Democrats are deciding which leaders they hope can guide them out of the wilderness. And we now know that Nancy Pelosi, the House Democratic leader for many years, will face a challenge in a leadership election this month. The challenger is Tim Ryan. He's a congressman from northeast Ohio, and he's on the line. Congressman, good morning. TIM RYAN: Good morning to you. INSKEEP: What's wrong with your current...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: As Donald Trump prepares to take over the White House, he's also facing trial on civil fraud charges in a federal court in San Diego. The suit was filed by students who took real estate seminars at his Trump University. The trial is scheduled to begin just 10 days from now, although Trump wants a delay and there's a hearing on that today. NPR's Ina Jaffe has been following the case. She joins us now. Hi, Ina. INA...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: President-elect Trump continues to be busy on Twitter. Last night on Twitter, he claimed credit for saving a Ford plant from being sent to Mexico, although Ford said it never had plans to move the plant to Mexico. In some ways, his activity on Twitter is in line with the tradition of presidents going around the so-called filter of the press. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Three days after...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Republicans have an opportunity they have not had in a decade. It's a chance for a Republican Congress to send legislation to a Republican president. The opportunity is also a challenge. For years, the party has passed legislation just for show, like repeatedly voting to repeal Obamacare. They didn't commit to any replacement but knew it didn't matter since President Obama would veto the repeal anyway. Now, big...

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