Politics & Government

It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

The Most Corrupt State In The Country Is ...

High-profile politicians have been brought up on charges in recent years, but which places do people think are most corrupt?
Collection Agency flickr Creative Commons

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 12:14 pm

Politics, power and more money than ever can create an environment ripe for corruption.

But which states are the most corrupt, and how is that even defined?

A poll out from Monmouth University asked Americans what they think are the most corrupt states. Overall, there was not much of a consensus, but New York rose to the top (with just 12 percent), followed by California, Illinois, New Jersey and Texas.

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Health
3:39 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Congress Repeals Medicare 'Doc Fix' Law, Ending Annual Scramble

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 6:40 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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It's All Politics
2:55 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

In Or Out In Congress? Gyrocopters, Tweets To Iran, Downton Abbey

An explosive ordnance disposal technician checks the gyrocopter that landed on the Capitol's South Lawn Wednesday.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 6:44 pm

In Congress, just like at any storied American institution — McDonald's, New York Fashion Week, the Bush and Clinton families — trends come and go.

The 114th Congress is now 100 days old. And it can be difficult to keep up with the goings and comings of the body and its 535 members — the negotiations, visits from world leaders, the scandals and, oh yeah, the legislation.

So here's our look at what's in and what's out on Capitol Hill:

Have something to add to the list? Tweet @nprpolitics.

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It's All Politics
7:03 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Throwback Thursday: Reagan Announces Run For President

It's been 35 years since Ronald Reagan announced his run for president. He did so just two months before the Iowa caucuses, unlike the protracted campaigning that takes place today.
WJZ AP

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 12:49 pm

Times in politics have changed.

Since it's the season for presidential campaign announcements, for evidence of just how much they've changed, look back 35 years to Ronald Reagan's announcement that he was running for president.

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It's All Politics
4:06 am
Thu April 16, 2015

Vulnerable Voting Machine Raises Questions About Election Security

Voters in Los Angeles County, Calif., cast their ballots in 2012.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 1:48 pm

Computer security experts have warned for years that some voting machines are vulnerable to attack. And this week, in Virginia, the state Board of Elections decided to impose an immediate ban on touchscreen voting machines used in 20 percent of the state's precincts, because of newly discovered security concerns.

The problems emerged on Election Day last November in Spotsylvania County. The AVS WINVote touchscreen machines used in precinct 302 began to shut down.

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National Security
5:17 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

President Obama To Remove Cuba From State-Sponsored Terrorism List

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:52 pm

President Obama intends to take Cuba off of the list of state sponsors of terrorism, and now Congress has a month and a half to decide if it wants to stop the process. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Roberta Jacobson, assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere Affairs, who led the negotiations between the U.S. and Cuba.

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Politics
5:17 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Sen. Corker Says Congress Didn't Yield On Compromise Iran Bill

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:52 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
2:38 pm
Wed April 15, 2015

Former FBI Agent Speaks Out: 'I Was Not Protected'

FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:52 pm

Robyn Gritz spent 16 years at the FBI, where she investigated a series of major national security threats. But she says she got crosswise with her supervisors, who pushed her out and yanked her security clearance.

For the first time, she's speaking out about her situation, warning about how the bureau treats women and the effects of a decade of fighting terrorism.

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It's All Politics
11:17 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Congress Says It Will Not Tolerate 'Agents Gone Wild'

"I'm very concerned about the public's respect for law enforcement officers and the safety of those they are designed to protect," House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, seen here in 2013, told NPR. "This is a very important issue to me and one I intend to follow closely."
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 4:53 pm

Update at 2:30 p.m. ET

On Wednesday, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz and fellow committee members released a statement expressing "no confidence" in DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart.

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It's All Politics
9:03 am
Wed April 15, 2015

You Didn't Check The 'Presidential Election Campaign' Box On Your Taxes, Did You?

iStock

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 11:46 am

Here's a question for you last-minute tax filers. See that little checkoff box at the top of the 1040 tax form, the one labeled "Presidential Election Campaign"? You didn't check it, did you?

If not, then you're just like pretty much everybody else.

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Politics
4:26 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Obama, Senate Compromise Gives Congress A Say On Iran Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 1:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
4:10 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Clinton Tours Iowa; Begins Outlining 4 Pillars Of Her Campaign

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 11:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
3:04 am
Wed April 15, 2015

A Decade After Blowing The Whistle On The FBI, Vindication

Kobus alerted his managers that a supervisor was allowing favorite employees to take time off for their birthdays, so the government had to pay more for other people at the agency to work overtime. "You know, this is not our money. This is the taxpayers' money, and I want it to be correct," he says.
Courtesy of Robert Kobus

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 9:00 am

Robert Kobus doesn't fit the stereotype of the disgruntled employee. He worked in administrative jobs at the FBI for 34 years, and he says he's seen the bureau at its best.

"My sister Deborah Kobus was a 9/11 victim, and the FBI treated me so well during that time," he says. "You know they really cared. I had a lot of friends, I know how important it is to have a strong FBI."

His sister died in the World Trade Center's south tower. When he helped walk out the last piece of steel at the site, he proudly wore his FBI jacket.

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History
2:34 am
Wed April 15, 2015

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans.
Hulton Archive Getty

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 11:33 am

John Wilkes Booth was the man who pulled the trigger, capping off a coordinated plot to murder President Abraham Lincoln.

But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, says that there's much more to Booth's life. His new biography, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, delves deep into his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president.

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The Two-Way
11:41 pm
Tue April 14, 2015

Congress Approves Longer-Term Fix For Medicare Reimbursements

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 6:49 pm

The Senate gave final passage Tuesday night to a lasting fix for a long-running problem with Medicare reimbursements for doctors, NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Doctors faced a 21 percent reduction in the fees.

Eight senators, all Republicans, voted against the bill because funding has not been fully allocated for its $214 billion cost. According to the Congressional Budget Office, the bill will add $141 billion to the federal budget deficit in the next decade.

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