parker griffith

Eric Parker
Brynn Anderson / AP

Federal prosecutors are trying for a second time to convict former Madison police officer Eric Parker of using unreasonable force when questioning an Indian man in February.

57 year old Sureshbhai Patel appears to have been slammed to the ground by Parker in a police dash camera video.

Robert Posey is the first assistant U.S. attorney for the northern district. He says the prosecution has good evidence on their side.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he plans to use any leftover campaign funds to benefit the state.

Bentley said Friday he will set up a charitable organization to receive his leftover funds and then distribute them to projects. He said no projects are definite, but one group he would like to help is foster children.

Bentley did something similar with his inaugural fund in 2011. He raised $1.6 million in donations to pay for his inauguration and had more than $300,000 left. He donated that to the state General Fund to support state agencies during a lean budget year.

Alabama's race for governor is heating up with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley releasing his first ad that focuses on his opponent.

Bentley's campaign posted an ad on social media Monday describing how Parker Griffith was elected to Congress as a Democrat, switched to the Republican Party and lost, and then switched back to the Democratic Party to run for governor.

The 30-second ad asks, "If Parker Griffith doesn't know who he is or what he stands for, how can we trust him to lead Alabama?"

A new national study says Alabama ranks 14th in the nation for money spent so far on television advertising during the 2014 elections.

The study by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity says candidates in Alabama had aired more than 30,000 TV ads through Oct. 6 that cost an estimated $10 million. That's about $2.80 per eligible voter.

The report says $2.6 million has been spent in the governor's race, with Republican incumbent Robert Bentley accounting for $2.1 million of that.

The state teachers' lobby has given Democratic candidate for governor Parker Griffith another financial boost.

The Alabama Education Association contributed $300,000 to Griffith's campaign on Friday. AEA also gave Griffith $300,000 in September.

The teachers' lobby is by far Griffith's largest cash contributor. Campaign finance reports show AEA's contributions make up $600,000 of the $647,000 in contributions raised by Griffith. The former congressman has also loaned his campaign $391,000.

Griffith and Republican Gov. Robert Bentley face off Nov. 4. / Office of the Governor

Gov. Robert Bentley has surpassed the $6 million fundraising mark in his quest to win a second term in office.

Bentley has raised $6.1 million over the last two years, according to fundraising reports filed Thursday.

Republican Bentley maintains a lopsided fundraising advantage over Democrat Parker Griffith a month ahead of the November election.

Griffith has raised $347,000 in cash donations since announcing his bid for governor.

The former congressman has also loaned his campaign $391,000.

Democratic candidate for governor Parker Griffith says that if elected, he would open discussions with the Poarch Creek Indians about a gambling compact that would allow them to operate casinos with more types of games.

Griffith said Thursday in Huntsville that the tribe has done a great job in Alabama, and he'd talk with them about expanding their gambling operations in some areas to generate more tax revenue for the state.

The tribe has casinos in Atmore, Montgomery and Wetumpka, but they have only electronic games. They do not have table games.

Associated Press

The state teachers' organization, the Alabama Education Association, has become the biggest contributor to Democrat Parker Griffith's campaign for governor.

Griffith filed a campaign finance report late Thursday afternoon showing he had received a $300,000 contribution from AEA. Prior to the contribution, he was reporting $25,050 in his campaign account.

The contribution comes after AEA's political action committee reported borrowing $700,000 from a bank on Sept. 4.

Center for Public Integrity

A national report says Alabama ranks 11th among the states in spending on TV ads for the 2104 state campaigns.

The report by the nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity found that candidates for state level offices in Alabama had spent $6.9 million on TV ads that had aired through Sept. 8.

Nearly half of that came in legislative races. Many larger states didn't come close to that level of spending in legislative races. One of the study's authors says low TV ad rates in Alabama make the advertising available in lower-level races.

Associated Press

Republican Gov. Robert Bentley and Democratic challenger Parker Griffith won't be speaking to the same audience at the same time, but they will be speaking on consecutive days.

Bentley is scheduled to address a convention of active and retired public employees Tuesday in Montgomery, and then Griffith talks to the group on Wednesday. Several other candidates for state offices are also on the agenda Wednesday.

The group, known as ARSEA/APEAL, is a combination of the Alabama Retired State Employees' Association and the Alabama Public Employees' Advocacy League.

Democrat Parker Griffith says he will give up his salary if elected governor and redirect the money to public education.

Griffith said Monday that he'd also sell the state plane and helicopter used by Republican incumbent Robert Bentley. Griffith says Bentley has made 480 flights since becoming governor and he's wasting taxpayer dollars.

Alabama voters aren't likely to see debates between Alabama's two candidates for governor.

Representatives of Republican incumbent Robert Bentley and Democratic challenger Parker Griffith had been talking about scheduling debates, but those talks failed.

Bentley says he welcomed a spirited exchange, but Griffith was only interested in negative campaigning and name-calling.

Griffith says Bentley is unmanly and arrogant for not being willing to debate his policies.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley is maintaining a large fundraising lead over Democratic challenger Parker Griffith.

The Republican incumbent has raised more than $5 million in contributions in his quest to win a second term.

Campaign fundraising reports filed Wednesday show that Bentley added more than $400,000 to his campaign war chest in August.

Associated Press

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Parker Griffith is challenging Republican Gov. Robert Bentley to a series of seven debates before the November election.

Griffith says he believes voters want to see the two face off in a debate and explain their visions for Alabama.

Griffith issued his debate challenge last week. On Friday, Griffith hauled a large inflatable duck to Montgomery to accuse Bentley of ducking his debate challenge.

Associated Press

Republican Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and his Democratic opponent, Parker Griffith, faced off Thursday in back-to-back campaign speeches.

Griffith took repeated jabs at Bentley as he addressed county commissioners' annual convention in Orange Beach.

Griffith called Bentley a failed governor who hasn't addressed the state's struggles with education, health care, prisons and unemployment. Griffith said Bentley lets fear of the tea party dictate his policy decisions.

Associated Press

Republican Gov. Robert Bentley and his Democratic opponent, former U.S. Rep. Parker Griffith, will make dueling campaign speeches in Orange Beach.

Bentley and Griffith are scheduled to address the annual convention of county commissioners Thursday afternoon. Griffith will speak first, followed by Bentley. Organizers say the candidates will not debate and will not be on stage at the same time.

The Democratic nominee for governor, Parker Griffith, calls Republican incumbent Robert Bentley timid and irresponsible.

Griffith says he plans to focus his general election campaign on Bentley refusing to expand the state Medicaid program and not doing enough to increase jobs in the state.

Bentley said Wednesday he doesn't like negative campaigning, and he will focus his campaign on his records and his goals. He says politicians might not be very good candidates if they have to spend their time talking about how bad their opponents are.

The Alabama Democratic Conference has endorsed former U.S. Rep. Parker Griffith for governor and incumbent Terry Sewell for re-election to Congress.

ADC Chairman Joe Reed said the black wing of the state Democratic Party met in Montgomery to screen candidates and make endorsements. He said the ADC's screening committee recommended Griffith over Kevin Bass because of his support for expanding Medicaid, raising the minimum wage and making sure that tax dollars for schools are spent on public education.

Most of the Democrats seeking the top offices in Alabama are scheduled to be in Huntsville for a political event Thursday. The event is being called "Hot Dogs and Yellow Dogs." Organizer and host Pam Miles says it will include gubernatorial candidates Parker Griffith and Kevin Bass, lieutenant governor candidate James Fields, attorney general candidate Joe Hubbard, state auditor candidate Miranda Joseph, and agriculture commissioner candidate Doug Smith. They are seeking offices currently held by Republicans. A dozen legislative candidates are also scheduled to attend the event Thursday.

Democrat Parker Griffith and Republican Robert Bentley are both 71, both doctors and both running for governor. But Griffith is emphasizing their differences in his race for governor. Griffith says he would repeal the state immigration law that Bentley signed and replace it with a law that doesn't put so many regulations on businesses. He says he would also expand the state Medicaid program under the federal health care law, and he would repeal the Alabama Accountability Act and its private school scholarships.

Former U.S. Rep. Parker Griffith kicked off his Democratic campaign for governor by calling for the creation of a state lottery to fund college scholarships and an expansion of the state Medicaid program under the federal health care law. Griffith says a healthier, better educated Alabama will lead to more jobs. Griffith outlined his campaign agenda of jobs, education and health care in a letter posted on his new campaign website Wednesday. In interviews, he called Republican incumbent Robert Bentley timid for not expanding Medicaid. Griffith was elected to Congress as a Democrat.

Former U.S. Rep. Parker Griffith of Huntsville is running for governor as a Democrat. Griffith turned in his qualifying papers at state party headquarters in Montgomery shortly before the deadline on Friday. Griffith served as a Democrat in the Alabama Senate and then was elected to Congress to represent part of north Alabama. After his election he switched to the Republican Party and lost a GOP primary bid to Mo Brooks, who now represents the 5th District. Griffith recently rejoined the Democratic Party.